Whitefish Review Hosts Author Gary Ferguson on June 6 for Release of Fire Issue #15


Whitefish Review Hosts Author Gary Ferguson on June 6 for Release of Fire Issue #15
Whitefish, Mont. (May 20, 2014) – Author Gary Ferguson will help light a literary fire on Friday, June 6 at The Lodge at Whitefish Lake for the launch of Whitefish Review’s ‘Fire’ issue #15. The gathering at the Lakeshore Tent Pavilion begins at 7 p.m. and the reading begins at 8 p.m.
“24 editors and readers on our growing team reviewed more than 300 photos and art submissions, 250 stories, 150 poems, and distilled it down to the 43 contributors in this fire-themed issue,” said founding editor, Brian Schott. “Fire, if anything is unpredictable–and we have a lot of surprising work to share.”
“Whitefish Review should have applied for a fire permit,” said Tom Kennelly, Fire Chief in Whitefish, Montana. “I hear that this new issue is that hot.”
The cover features the painting “Before,” an acrylic on panel of an unstruck match by Portland, Oregon artist Sarah Fagan. Photographer Steven Gnam’s photo “Charred” is featured on the back cover, a detail shot of a burned tree on Demers Ridge in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley.
The literary collection features an original essay by Ferguson, as well as a conversation with author Bill McKibben discussing a warming planet. In addition to a variety of authors at the top of their careers, the issue also introduces two first-time writers, 15-year old Rachel Litchman, currently a freshman at Kimball Union Academy in New Hampshire, and 58-year old Betty Kijewski, a photographer and master volunteer for Resource Management in Glacier National Park.
Beyond the 15 contributors from Montana, other artists and authors hail from Alabama, California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.
The 16-page art and photo section was guest edited by Michele Carlson, an artist, writer and educator who teaches at California College of the Arts, in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is the managing editor of Hyphenmagazine and a member of the curatorial committee at Southern Exposure.
The evening will begin with music by members of the Tropical Montana Marimba Ensemble and Tra La Gael, including author/musician Tom Harpole who has an essay featured in this issue. A photo from the new issue by Whitefish photographer Chance Ling will also come to life. Logan Zerr will spin fire in a traditional poi dance along the lake shore. As a performance art, poi involves swinging flaming tethered weights through a variety of rhythmical and geometric patterns. Prior to the featured reading, Betty Kijewski will share her first published essay with the audience.
Gary Ferguson will read from his forthcoming memoir “The Carry Home” due to be published in November by Counterpoint Press. It is both a moving celebration of the outdoor life shared between Ferguson and his wife, Jane, who died in a canoeing accident in 2005, and a chronicle of the mending, uplifting power of nature.
Ferguson is the author of 22 books on nature, science, and history. A member of the National GeographicLecture Series, Ferguson has given keynote presentations and workshops across the nation. “Hawks Rest” (National Geographic, 2003), became the first book to win nonfiction book of the year from both the Pacific Northwest and Mountains and Plains booksellers associations and “Decade of the Wolf” (Lyons Press, 2005) was selected as the Montana Book of the Year.
Whitefish Review is a non-profit journal publishing the literature, art, and photography of mountain culture. As a recognized 501(c)(3) tax-exempt corporation created for the public good, it is supported by generous donations, grants, and subscriptions.
The evening is sponsored by The Whitefish Community Foundation, Jest Gallery, Whitefish Mountain Resort, The Lodge at Whitefish Lake, and the donors of Whitefish Review. A $10 suggested entry donation is requested to help offset costs of the evening. A 2014-15 season pass at Whitefish Mountain Resort will also be raffled to raise additional funds.
Visit www.WhitefishReview.orgfor more information.
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Whitefish Review Hosts Author Gary Ferguson on June 6 for Release of Fire Issue #15

Whitefish Review and Rick Bass


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Whitefish Review Announces $1000 Rick Bass/Montana Prize for Fiction
Whitefish, Mont. (May 5, 2014) — Author Rick Bass will serve as the judge for Whitefish Review’s fiction prize –“The Rick Bass/Montana Prize for Fiction”. Writers may submit previously unpublished stories under 5000 words per entry. First place winner of the fiction prize will receive $1,000 and be published in issue #16 to be released in December. Runners-up and finalists may also be considered for publication.
Rick Bass’s fiction has received O. Henry Awards, numerous Pushcart Prizes, awards from the Texas Institute of Letters, fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, among others. His memoir Why I Came West was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award. Bryan Woolley of the Dallas Morning News said, “Probably no American writer since Hemingway has written about man-in-nature more beautifully or powerfully than Rick Bass.” Rick Bass
Whitefish Review is a nationally-acclaimed, non-profit journal publishing the distinctive literature, art, and photography of mountain culture. Author Doug Peacock has called it, “One of the most refreshing journals to hit the literary scene in years.”
Featuring established and emerging authors and artists, Whitefish Review weaves a diverse mix of stories, interviews and conversations along with a 16-page color art section. It is published twice a year, in December and June. As a recognized 501(c)3 tax-exempt corporation created for the public good, it is supported by generous donations, grants, and subscriptions.
The journal has featured interviews with Tom Brokaw, Russell Chatham, David James Duncan, John Irving, Tom McGuane, and Terry Tempest Williams, and published the original work of Rick Bass, Douglas H. Chadwick, Pete Fromm, Pam Houston, Doug Peacock, Rick DeMarinis, Annick Smith, Jack Turner, William Kittredge and many other distinguished authors.
While publishing some of the finest voices in the American West and beyond, the journal is also discovering and launching promising writers. Every issue features a previously unpublished writer chosen by the editors, as part of their mission to discover and nurture budding writers. Often these writers are featured in events alongside famous literary figures.
The deadline for submissions for the fiction prize is September 15 and there is a $15 fee to submit. Submissions for the next regular reading period do not carry a fee and are accepted from August 1 – October 1. All submissions are accepted via an online submission manager at www.WhitefishReview.org. For full guidelines, visit the web site.
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This email was sent to kburgoyne@mt.gov by brian@whitefishreview.org |  
Whitefish Review, Inc. | 708 Lupfer Ave. | Whitefish | MT | 59937
Whitefish Review and Rick Bass

Whitefish Review


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Hi Folks,

Sunday, March 16, 2014 at midnight mountain time is the deadline to submit your art, literature, and photography for consideration in issue #15 of Whitefish Review. I know that deadlines set a fire under me. We are thankful to the community of supporters who have helped us make this non-profit journal a success beyond what we ever dreamed.

So what kind of a success is it? And what dreams did we have? Well, that’s hard to qualify in measurable terms. What I can tell you in a few sentences is that it has filled our hearts, challenged our bank accounts, and generally made the world a better place. The only real dream I had was connecting with more artists and writers across the American West and beyond in order to share their work with the world. That goal has come true. Big time.

Here I am opening the first box of journals seven years ago about five hours before we were throwing a big party to announce our new journal in our small mountain town. William Kittredge and some other famous authors had gone to bat for us and we had this cool little collection of big time writers and first time authors in a beautiful little book with wild art and photography.

From there we’ve pushed. Hard. There have been a few times when we have wondered if we should keep doing it. But then you always came through. Whether it was you with a nice little donation or some story that we could not get out of our brains, or your photo that was so different, or that piece of art that led us down deeper paths of thinking.

Just the other day I opened a few older issues and started reading. I was happy to be reminded that this really is a beautiful venture that my team has been able to bring into the world. It’s fun to discover again what we so easily forget.

So look at us. We’re a rag-tag bunch. Regular people trying to do wonderful things. We like skiing and skateboarding. We value family and friends and think that art ads fabric to our lives. The whole snapshot of our larger crew is missing, but it would tell the same story. (At last count we have 39 people working on each issue.) I owe a huge debt to the people who have helped us and I stay up late many nights trying to make sure I honor that. 

Here I am again a few summers ago in a funny photo (thanks Noah Couser for the shots) — serving up a hot issue of Whitefish Review from the grill. The FIRE issue is going to be hot, and we’re still working up a lot of surprises to share with you. Another thing you should know about us is that laughter is our medicine. This is fun!

But for now. What are you waiting for? If you have a story to tell, we want to see it.

In our last journal — the Hunger issue — we introduced a first time writer who is in high school. I asked Kate Ehrenberg to share a thought about her experience:

“One ordinary school day, while sitting in math class, I learned that a short story I had written was going to be published. I refused to stop smiling for days. This is just a small example of how important Whitefish Review is in our community. Not only do they create an oasis of art and creativity, but they have also possibly changed my life. I am now a published author.”
I also asked author Tim Cahill about his experience being our featured reader at our December launch party when he read after Kate had shared her story with the audience:
“Kate reminded me of myself before my first public reading. The only difference is that I was 29. I wish that I had had the opportunity to read before a largely adult audience at her age. Then again, I don’t believe I ever wrote anything as good as Kate’s story when I was 17. Perhaps I might have tried if the same opportunity was open to me then.”
I hope you can read Kate’s story — you can order it online and help us keep the stories flowing. 
Issue #15, “The Fire Issue” will be launched on June 6 at The Lodge at Whitefish Lake. Right now I have very little idea how that issue will look adn feel. Next week the fun work begins with my team as we begin the process of selecting the creative offerings that have been sent to us. We’ll also soon announce our featured authors who will read at the next launch party.
We do need donations — so please help if you can. You can donate online easily and the tax
people will give you a break. We have no advertisers. This is a pure venture. The good people like you make it possible. 
Please consider a subscription. 200% money back guarantee you’ll enjoy it. Call me on my cell if you hate it and I’ll send you double the money back. 406-261-6190. I might put you on the line with our lead sales person (age 2) if you are grumpy.
    
This issue will be hot. We’re still pushing. Thank you for your support.
–Brian Schott
Founding Editor  
Whitefish Review 
 Burning books is bad. We’re sorry. It was pretty fun though.
This email was sent to kburgoyne@mt.gov by brian@whitefishreview.org |  
Whitefish Review, Inc. | 708 Lupfer Ave. | Whitefish | MT | 59937
Whitefish Review

WHITEFISH REVIEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS IN ART, LITERATURE & PHOTOGRAPHY


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WHITEFISH REVIEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS IN ART, LITERATURE & PHOTOGRAPHY
Editors Seek Interpretations of the theme “Fire”
Whitefish, Mont. — Whitefish Review is looking to heat things up. In the midst of a polar vortex, the editorial team recently selected “fire” as the theme for issue #15. Submissions for the summer 2014 issue are now being reviewed in art, photography, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. For writers and artists high school level and below, there is a special category.
“Fire is universal. It warms. It bonds people together. It’s hot and unpredictable,” said Brian Schott, founding editor, shivering in his office. “This primal force can be contained or let loose and take on a life of its own. Fire is elemental and beautiful, but there is also a dangerous side. Fire destroys, but this essential force of nature also creates renewal and room for growth.”
Submissions are accepted through March 15 via www.whitefishreview.org. Full guidelines are explained on the web site.
Whitefish Review is a nationally-acclaimed, non-profit journal publishing the distinctive literature, art, and photography of mountain culture. In addition to a diverse mix of stories, interviews and conversations, a 16-page color art and photography section is featured with commentary from the artists and photographers.
In addition to publishing work from writers and artists at the height of their careers, the journal specifically seeks new, previously unpublished talent.
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  Sunrise
This email was sent to kburgoyne@mt.gov by brian@whitefishreview.org |  
Whitefish Review, Inc. | 708 Lupfer Ave. | Whitefish | MT | 59937
WHITEFISH REVIEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS IN ART, LITERATURE & PHOTOGRAPHY

Whitefish Review Hosts Author Tim Cahill for Release of #14, The Hunger Issue


Whitefish Review Hosts Author Tim Cahill for Release of #14, The Hunger Issue
Dec. 14 Release Party Features Young Author Paired with the Pros
Whitefish, Mont. (Dec. 7, 2013) — Author Tim Cahill will kick off the launch of issue #14 for the literary journal, Whitefish Review on Saturday, Dec. 14, reading at Casey’s in downtown Whitefish. Cahill is a Livingston, Montana writer who was a founding editor of Outside magazine, an early editor of Rolling Stone, and has published nine books. He was also the co-writer of three IMAX films, two of which were nominated for Academy Awards.
Doors open at 7 p.m. with live music by David Noftsinger. Readings start at 7:30 p.m. introducing young author Kate Ehrenberg, followed by authors Charles Finn and David Allan Cates, with featured author Cahill completing the live literary presentations.
Whitefish Review is a reliable beacon of literacy and proves that the brightest lights often shine in the most unexpected places,” says author Tom McGuane.
The creative exploration into the theme of hunger and how artists and writers interpret it was led by fiction editor Matt Holloway and guest art editor Michael Haykin. #14 features 38 artists, writers and photographers, weaving a narrative through 6 poems, 14 stories, and 18 pieces of art and photography. A short essay by each artist and photographer brings readers deeper into their creative minds.
The cover of the 160-page journal features “Just One More Little Bite,” a rakued clay piece by Whitefish-area artist Stephen Braun that explores the concept of hunger for resources and the idea that just one more little bite will do no harm. A man whose business jacket and pants are covered in the icons of industry and consumption stretches his neck to take one more little bite from planet earth, which is floating above him.
The back cover features a quilt made from heat-sealed potato chip bags by Brooklyn artist Matthew Paulson. “Emergency Quilts” functions similar to first-aid emergency wraps, with integrated patterns on both sides designed to cloak victims and heroes alike.
#14 also features an interview with Cahill and a humorous conversation with authors David Allan Cates and Pete Fromm, as they discuss the life of the hungry writer. The journal also showcases original fiction by both writers.
Cates is the author of four novels, winner of a Gold Medal for Best Fiction in the 2013 Independent Book Publishers Book Awards, and a winner of the 2010 Montana Arts Council’s Artist Innovation Award in prose. Fromm is a four-time winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Literary Award, the author of five short story collections, three novels, and a memoir. In 2013 the film of his novel, As Cool as I Am, was released, starring Claire Danes, James Marsden, and Sarah Bolger.
Whitefish Review editors selected fiction by first-time author Kate Ehernberg, who will read from her work at the release party. Ehrenberg is a sophomore at Whitefish High School.
“We take a lot of pride in discovering new artistic talent and showcasing it next to established authors,” said founding editor Brian Schott. “It’s one of the primary missions of Whitefish Review and makes these release parties especially gratifying.”
For the first time since its inception in 2007, Whitefish Review is partnering with Thomas Printing of Kalispell, Montana to print the journal. Thomas Printing was established in 1962, recycles over 300 tons of paper each year, and uses environment-friendly chemicals in the printing process.
“We’ve always had ambitions on a global scale. We are grounded on our home turf in and the American West, but strive to publish the best literature and art in this increasingly small world,” said Schott. “Working with Frank Thomas and his team feels good because it means our journal is doing just one more small thing for the local community while we continue to think big.”
Founded in 2007, Whitefish Review is a nationally-acclaimed, non-profit journal publishing the distinctive literature, art, and photography of mountain culture. It is published twice a year, in December and June. As a recognized 501(c)(3) corporation created for the public good, it is supported by generous tax-deductible donations.
The evening is sponsored in part by grants from The Whitefish Community Foundation and The Montana Arts Council, an agency of the State Government. Good Medicine Lodge, Grouse Mountain Lodge, and many individual donors make these events and the publication of the journal possible. A $10 suggested entry donation is requested to help with operational costs.
Editors will review new submissions for issue #15 from Jan. 1 – March 15, 2014. Visit www.WhitefishReview.orgfor more information.
Whitefish Review Hosts Author Tim Cahill for Release of #14, The Hunger Issue

WHITEFISH REVIEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS IN ART, LITERATURE & PHOTOGRAPHY


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WHITEFISH REVIEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS IN ART, LITERATURE & PHOTOGRAPHY
Current submissions are for Winter 2013-14 issue, published December 14.
Submissions accepted through November 1 via www.whitefishreview.org 
Montana’s Whitefish Review invites you to submit your best work for issue #14. In this issue we’ll explore hunger. What do you hunger for? What feeds your hunger? Why are you hungry?
SUBMISSIONS:
     Art: Up to 5 pieces of art (all genres)
     Photography: Up to 5 color photos AND/OR 5 black and white photos
     Fiction: 1 piece (under 5000 words)
     Non-fiction: 1 piece (under 5000 words)
     Poetry: 1 poem
All submissions accepted online at www.whitefishreview.org.
Whitefish Review is a nationally-acclaimed, non-profit journal publishing the distinctive literature, art, and photography of mountain culture. Featuring established and emerging authors and artists, the journal has published interviews and the original work of distinguished authors and artists like Rick Bass, Tom Brokaw, Russell Chatham, David James Duncan, Pete Fromm, Pam Houston, John Irving, William Kittredge, Thomas McGuane, Doug Peacock, Ray Troll, Jack Turner, and Terry Tempest Williams, while also discovering new promising writers and artists. In addition to a diverse mix of stories, interviews and conversations, a 16-page color art and photography section is featured with commentary from the artists and photographers.
“We’ve been hungry from the start of this project seven years ago,” said Brian Schott, founding editor. “With the help of my growing team we continue to push onward in search of writers, artists, and photographers whose art burns in a growling belly.”
Matt Holloway will lead this creative exploration as the lead editor for the new issue. Artist Michael Haykin has been tapped as the first art and photography guest editor. To kick off the publication, author Tim Cahill will do a reading in Whitefish on December 14 to support the launch, as well as be featured in an interview.
“I know many types of hunger beyond my minute scrapes with the physical,” said Holloway, who has served as the Whitefish Review fiction editor for the past four years. “In my heart churns a hunger for words, to write well, a little better every day. Keeping me sane is a hunger for wildness and wilderness, and the freedom of the mountains. Stark and inevitable, the hunger for my kids to be a part of near-distant world with clean air, water, and food, one that they love and call home, is consuming. I hunger for much, I know.”
Holloway lives with his wife, daughter and son in Columbia Falls, Montana and writes when he’s not clawing around in the wilderness. His work has appeared in Montana Magazine, Big Sky Journal, Montana Headwall, Montana Naturalist, A Natural History of Now: Reports from the Edge of Nature (anthology), and the inaugural issue of Whitefish Review. Holloway graduated with an MFA in Creative Writing from the Rainier Writing Workshop in 2012.
“My hunger for exploration, for discovery, has me wade into the current and out of my depth,” says Haykin. “This hunger feeds only upon itself and fuels the very fire that it has itself kindled-this small, intensely bright and inextinguishable light of creation. As an artist, what satisfies me for a bit is capturing the mystery without subduing it.”
Based in Boulder, Montana, Haykin’s work has been shown in places like the Holter Museum of Fine Art in Helena, Helander Gallery in Palm Beach, the Works Gallery in Southampton, NY, the Limbo Gallery in New York City, as well as Jest Gallery in Whitefish.
Cahill is a Livingston, Montana based writer who was a founding editor of Outside magazine, an early editor of Rolling Stone, has written for National Geographic, The New York Times Book Review, and Esquire, and has published nine books. He was the co-writer of three IMAX films, two of which were nominated for Academy Awards.
As a recognized 501(c)(3) tax-exempt corporation created for the public good, the journal is supported by generous donations, grants, and subscriptions. Submissions for #14 are accepted through the web site at www.WhitefishReview.org through November 1 where full guidelines are available. 
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WHITEFISH REVIEW CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS IN ART, LITERATURE & PHOTOGRAPHY