Do Not Privatize Federal Cultural Agencies


A good arguments against privatization of the NEA….

May 2014
In This Issue
Executive Director’s Column
Announcements and Resources
Legislative Update
State to State
Research on Demand
More Notes from NASAA
NASAA Resources
Gifts to NASAA support the services state arts agencies need the most.
Thank you!
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ZoomInto: Pictures, Images and Photos
ZoomInto: Pictures, Images and Photos
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Newsletter Tools
Executive Director’s Column
Do Not Privatize Federal Cultural Agencies
A House budget resolution suggesting privatization of the National Endowment for the Arts and other cultural agencies would be detrimental to the public. Here’s why . . . Read more
Announcements and Resources
NASAA News and Current Information
§  NASAA Report to Councils, April 2014
§  Be Informed, Be Heard, Belong
§  Tennessee, Ohio, New Jersey Students Earn Top Prizes at Poetry Out Loud
§  New NEA Arts Data Profile: Artists with Dual Careers
§  2014 State of the Nonprofit Sector Survey Results
§  Evaluation of Prison Arts Pilot Program
§  A Policy Agenda for Creative Youth Development
§  The Economic Impact of After-School Arts Programs
§  Collective Impact Resource Clearinghouse
§  Center for the Future of Museums: TrendsWatch 2014
§  Arts, Health and Well-being: Six Case Studies
§  National Cooperative Extension System in the 21st Century
Legislative Update
NASAA Testimony; Chu Nomination
Last month, NASAA submitted testimony to Congress on the fiscal year 2015 budget for the National Endowment for the Arts . . . The nomination process for the next NEA chair is moving forward . . . Read more
State to State
Showcasing SAA Ingenuity
Iowa’s 2014 Cultural Caucuses. . . Summer Youth Employment in the Arts Program in Illinois . . . Maryland asks: O Say Can You Sing? . . . Read more
Research on Demand
Ask NASAA!
NASAA’s information services are at members’ fingertips—as this compilation demonstrates . . . Read more
More Notes from NASAA
Help in Accessing NASAA Information

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Do Not Privatize Federal Cultural Agencies

Art Works May 19 2014


NEA logo
           Newsletter: May 19, 2014
In the News
It is with great sadness that the National Endowment for the Arts acknowledges the passing of Joe Wilder, recipient of a 2008 NEA Jazz Masters fellowship, the nation’s highest honor in jazz.
Webinar Wednesday: Technology and Creativity
How will new technologies like Google Glass foster creative expression and learning? Join award-winning product designer and inventor Hayes Raffle this Wednesday, May 21st at 3:00 pm EDT as he explores this and other questions on the intersections of technology and the arts. Raffle is the Principal of Topobo, LLC and Staff Interaction Researcher working on Project Glass at Google[x], a research facility dedicated to making major technological advancements. Register now.
Art Works Podcasts
“The release of being able to actually tell your own story I would imagine is really profound. It’s a way of channeling those feelings into something else, something quite tangible.” In this week’s podcast, Josephine Reed talks with Adam Sherlock of “Sending Messages,” a podcast series produced by incarcerated youth. 
In Case You Couldn’t Join Us
In the second of a three-part webinar series, “Learning from Abroad,” U.S. and U.K. designers discussed the intersection of design and government.
Highlights from the Art Works Blog
Art Talk with Patrick Rosal: “There is no guarantee that art changes anything in us. But I like to think that I have inherited poetic traditions closely allied to a culture of work, and that culture at least partially consists of remembering, gathering, questioning, inventing, and naming.” In this interview Rosal–a poet, musician, and educator–shares his views on poetry as an act of community and history, art as work, and the tension between the traditional American dream and the life of the artist.

Announcing the new #NEABigRead grantees: Jan Schmidt of Storytelling and Arts Center of the Southeast–one of the 77 nonprofits recommended for a 2014-2015 Big Read grant–chats with us about the impact of the program in her North Carolina community.

Notable Quotable: Rajiv Joseph: Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright Rajiv Joseph talks about the inspiration behind his work.

Why Children’s Books Matter: In honor of Children’s Book Week 2014, New York Public Library Children’s Librarian Betsy Bird shares some interesting–and surprising!–facts about children’s literature at home and abroad. 

The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector.
Federal Grants
Grants.gov, the federal   grant making portal, can provide you with notification of upcoming funding opportunities across the federal government. Sign up to be notified whenever new guidelines are posted.

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Art Works May 19 2014

National Endowment for the Arts to Present Guidelines Webinar for Challenge America Fast-Track on April 2, 2014


National Endowment for the Arts to Present Guidelines Webinar for  Challenge America Fast-Track on April 2, 2014
Application Deadline is May 8, 2014
NEA’s Challenge America Fast-Track Director, Michael Killoren, will present a webinar on Wednesday, April 2, 2014 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET to help potential applicants navigate the application materials and process. There will be an overview presentation of CAFT guidelines, followed by a Q & A. 
Challenge America Fast-Track grants:
·        Extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations.
·        Are limited to 4 specific types of projects: arts event featuring a guest artist(s), public art, unified promotion, and design.
·        Are for a fixed amount of $10,000 and require a minimum $10,000 match.
·        Receive an expedited application review.
For more information and to register for the webinar, go to the NEA newsroom.
National Endowment for the Arts to Present Guidelines Webinar for Challenge America Fast-Track on April 2, 2014

March 2014 Updates from the NEA Office of Accessibility



March 2014 Updates from the NEA Office of Accessibility
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SAA/RAO Accessibility Coordinator Peer Session at the Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability Conference. Save the date! In August the Office of Accessibility plans to repeat our successful Accessibility Coordinator Peer Session at the Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability (LEAD) conference in Chicago, IL. The pre-conference session take place Sunday, August 3 from 1:00-5:00 p.m. CT and Monday, August 4, from 8:30 a.m.-12 noon CT. The LEAD conference will begin the afternoon of August 4 and run through the evening of August 6. We look forward to seeing you there! https://www.kennedy-center.org/accessibility/education/lead/conference.html
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VSA Funding Available for Organizations to Perform Arts, Education and Disability Programming.  The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Office of VSA and Accessibility, is seeking proposals from organizations  to carry out the following 8 (eight) VSA programs:  VSA Arts Connect All Professional Development Program,  VSA Arts Connect All Workshop/Residency Program, VSA Children’s Visual Art Discovery Program, VSA International Young Soloists: Music for Every Student Program, VSA Playwright Discovery Program, VSA Rosemary Kennedy Internship Program, VSA Museum Access for Kids Program, and VSA Performing Arts Access for Kids Program.  Contract amounts will vary but generally range between $3,000 and $30,000. Deadline is May 19, 2014.  http://www.kennedy-center.org/education/vsa/programs/requests_for_proposals.cfm
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NEA Funding Available through Challenge America Fast-Track.  Challenge America Fast-Track grants enable eligible entities, particularly those organizations that are small or mid-sized, to extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations—those demographics whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. CAFT offers $10,000 matching grants for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development.  Deadline is May 8, 2014.  For more information, register for the CAFT Guidelines Webinar occurring April 2, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET.   http://arts.gov/grants-organizations/challenge-america-fast-track
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Best of luck to your Poetry Out Loud state champions at the National Finals!
Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or want to let us know what is happening in your state. Accessibility@arts.gov, Beth Bienvenu at Bienvenub@arts.gov, or Katie Lyles Levy at Levyk@arts.gov
March 2014 Updates from the NEA Office of Accessibility

U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and National Endowment for the Arts Release Preliminary Report on Impact of Arts and Culture on U.S. Economy


 

Arts and Cultural Production Account for 3.2 Percent — or $504 Billion — of Gross Domestic Product in 2011
Washington, DC – The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) released prototype estimates today from the new Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA). This is the first federal effort to provide in-depth analysis of the arts and cultural sector’s contributions to current-dollar gross domestic product (GDP), a measure of the final dollar value of all goods and services produced in the United States. According to these new estimates, 3.2 percent — or $504 billion — of current-dollar GDP in 2011 was attributable to arts and culture. In comparison, BEA’s estimated value of the U.S. travel and tourism industry was 2.8 percent of GDP.
“The positive value of arts and culture on society has been understood on a human level for millennia. With this new effort, we are now able to quantify the impact of arts and culture on GDP for the very first time. Better utilizing this type of knowledge and information is part of the Department of Commerce’s ‘Open for Business Agenda,’ through which we are seeking to provide more transparency and data to enhance decision-making, create more value, and better understand and grow our economy,” said U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker.
“Art and culture is a significant part of the U.S. economy. Not just its contributions of ideas and creativity to the innovation economy, but also as an important part of the labor force and our country’s GDP,” said NEA Senior Deputy Chairman Joan Shigekawa. “The Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account is an unprecedented resource for detailed, reliable data on the economic value associated with arts and cultural activity.”
The ACPSA is the latest in a series of BEA satellite accounts that complement BEA’s core industry economic accounts with detailed data on industries such as travel and tourism, healthcare, transportation, and research and development. Satellite accounts are supplementary estimates that do not change the official U.S. economic accounts, including GDP.  Rather, these satellite accounts provide greater detail than in the U.S. economic accounts and allow analysis of a particular aspect of the economy, such as arts and cultural production. BEA, a unit of the Commerce Department, produces statistics on the U.S. economy’s performance. 
The ACPSA provides national estimates for the years 1998-2011 on select arts and cultural commodities and industries (both for profit and nonprofit) that are currently reflected in GDP. These estimates consist of nominal industry output, direct and indirect employment (salaried and self-employed), compensation of employees, and “value added” by industry.[i] BEA will seek industry and public comment on the prototype ACPSA, which could lead to future refinements.  
Among the key findings:
·        Arts and GDP – For 2011, the value added from arts and cultural production (ACP) accounted for nearly 3.2 percent, or $504 billion, of GDP. The leading contributing industries were motion picture and video production, advertising services, cable television production and distribution, publishing, and the performing arts.[ii]
  • Valuable arts commodities, from advertising to arts education – For 2011, the gross output of ACP was $916 billion. The table below shows the eight leading contributors to ACP output for 2011. Advertising (creative content only) output held the largest share of ACP with an output of $200 billion, or 20 percent of all arts and cultural commodities. The second largest share was arts education (including post-secondary fine arts schools, fine arts and performing arts departments, and academic performing arts centers) with an ACP output of $104 billion. Cable television production and distribution with $100 billion in output and “motion picture and video goods and services” with $83 billion in output had the third and fourth largest shares.
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  • Arts and the recession – The arts suffered more than the overall economy during the great recession of 2007-2009. Between 1998 and 2006, the ratio of current-dollar value added for ACP to current-dollar GDP ranged between 3.5 and 3.7 percent. In 2007, the ratio fell to 3.3 percent of GDP, and dipped further to 3.2 percent in 2009 where it held steady through 2011.
ACPaspercentofGDP_12.jpg


  • ACP trade deficit reverses – A 10-year trend of ACP trade deficits was reversed beginning with 2008, when the United States began posting trade surpluses in ACP commodities. In 2011, the United States exported $10.4 billion more ACP commodities than it imported. Prior to 2008, however, the United States ran trade deficits in this sector, a trend that largely reflected the ACP commodities most often traded — jewelry and silverware (50 percent of ACP imports) and motion picture and video goods and services (36 percent of ACP exports). During the 2007-2009 recession and its aftermath, imports of jewelry and silverware waned, while exports of movies, TV shows, etc., remained comparatively strong, despite the weak worldwide economy at that time.
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·        ACP employment – In 2011, the production of arts and cultural goods and services employed 2.0 million workers and generated $289.5 billion in employee compensation in the form of wages, salaries, and supplements. The largest share worked in the motion picture and video industry, which employed nearly 310,000 workers at $25 billion in compensation. Museums and performing arts industries each employed roughly 100,000 workers who earned $6 billion and $8 billion, respectively. The 2007-2009 recession took a heavy toll on arts and cultural employment. In 2009 alone, ACPSA-related employment declined by more than 170,000.
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  • High-ranking cultural industries – In 2011, six industries accounted for 45 percent of ACP value added. They are motion picture and video industries, advertising services (creative content only), cable television production, TV and radio broadcasting, newspaper and magazine publishing, and the performing arts and independent artists.[iii] 
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ACPSA tools and resources
The ACPSA offers far more detail than previous measures, which often aggregated arts industry data and combined them with other sectors, such as spectator sports. In addition to the core account data, the NEA and BEA offer several analytical resources. The NEA website, for instance, features many more tables with detailed information about ACPSA industries. Also on the NEA website, a series of issue briefs examine several aspects of the account, from GDP to production, and more. These resources provide specific examples, such as delving into particular performing arts categories from theater to symphonies to circuses. Readers will also learn about arts-related production in non-arts industries, such as the share of arts production in software publishing (for computer games, computer assisted design, and other arts-related software). Available online as part of the NEA’s Arts Data Profile series, these resources include:
  • Links to the satellite account tables for 1998-2011, including more detailed industry information.
  • ACPSA “issue briefs” with key findings on GDP, the recession, imports and exports, arts workers, and select industries.
  • An NEA Guide to the U.S. Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account, a white paper which describes the rationale, methods, and goals of the account, and discusses similar international efforts to measure arts and the economy. This paper also sets forth classification and methods for computing the economic value of arts and cultural workers and volunteers.
  • Links to other federal data sources.
In the fall of 2014, BEA will release revised ACSPA estimates for 1998-2012, and will publish the findings in The Survey of Current Business, BEA’s monthly publication for leaders in economics and policy. Industry and public comment on the prototype ACSPA can be emailed to ArtsandCulture@bea.govPlease address comments to Carol E. Moylan, associate director for Industry Economic Accounts at BEA.
Defining “Culture” in the Context of Input-Output Tables for the Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA)
Culture can be defined in a variety of ways to include language, traditions, beliefs, and values. For this new account, we defined arts and cultural production to be largely consistent with definitions used by the United Nations and the European Union. By following these guidelines our definition of arts and culture is narrowly tailored to include creative artistic activity, the goods and services produced by it, the goods and services produced in the support of it, and finally the construction of buildings in which it is taking place. 
The Input-Output (I-O) table is a valuable tool to identify and then estimate the value of the “creative chain.” This chain captures the economic value as we move from the creation of a cultural product (composing a symphony) to its production (the performance being recorded in a studio), then the distribution (by various modes), and finally the consumption (by the listener).
The framework used to produce these preliminary estimates is the 2002 Benchmark I-O table. These estimates will be updated using the 2007 Benchmark I-O table in late 2014.
About NEA research
The NEA is the only federal agency to conduct periodic analyses of the value and impact of the arts in American life. For nearly 40 years, the NEA Office of Research & Analysis has produced research publications, conferences, and data sources on arts-related topics of interest to policy-makers, educators, journalists, cultural researchers and practitioners, and the general public. Many of these products have emerged in consultation or collaboration with other federal agencies such as the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In recent years, the NEA launched a new research grant opportunity to support research that investigates the value and/or impact of the arts
About the National Endowment for the Arts
The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. To join the discussion on how art works, visit the NEA at www.arts.org.
#  #  #
Sally Gifford | Public Affairs Specialist | National Endowment for the Arts
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW | Suite 525 | Washington, DC  20008
giffords@arts.gov | 202-682-5606
URL – www.arts.gov


[i] Value added is a measure of the incomes earned in production in each industry. As such, it is also a measure of an industry’s contribution to GDP. The components of value added consist of compensation of employees, taxes on production and imports less subsidies, and gross operating surplus.
[ii] Advertising services includes only the creative content and excludes media buying, public relations, and direct mail.
[iii] Excludes government “art-support” such as government-operated libraries, museums, parks, and state college and university arts departments and performing arts centers
U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and National Endowment for the Arts Release Preliminary Report on Impact of Arts and Culture on U.S. Economy

Arts Art Works



The deadline for applications to the National Endowment for the Arts Art Works funding category is August 8.  For Local Arts Agencies, this is the deadline for Programmingprojects which may include:
Creation

  • Artist commissions, including those for public art.
  • Artist residencies where the primary purpose is to create new art.
  • Innovative projects using technology, media, new models, or other strategies in the creation of new work.

Engagement

  • Performing arts events, readings, screenings, broadcasts, and visual arts exhibitions.
  • Innovative projects to increase access to the arts or works of art.
  • Innovative collaborations that strengthen the field of community arts journalism and arts criticism.
  • Subgranting for programming activities on behalf of a local arts agency’s constituents. To be eligible, a local arts agency must be a unit of city or county government or designated to operate on behalf of its local government. In addition to the “Applicant Eligibility” section for all Grants for Arts Projects applicants, applicants for subgranting projects must have a three-year history of subgranting in the arts prior to the application deadline.
  • Documentation and conservation of public and monumental art.

Learning

  • Artist residencies where the primary purpose is the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts.
  • Education and related activities for youth, adults, intergenerational groups, and schools. (If your project is for youth, see “Choosing the Right Discipline for Youth Projects” to help you in your discipline selection.)

Livability

  • The enhancement of public spaces through commissioning and/or installation of art works.
A webinar outlining the application process can be viewed here.  Click here to learn how to prepare and submit an application.
For more information, e-mail Locals@arts.gov
Arts Art Works

June 2013 Updates from the NEA Office of Accessibility



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NEA Webinar: Web Sites, Videos, Mobile Apps, + Video Games: Accessibility for All. The NEA Office of Accessibility recently hosted a webinar on making websites, videos, mobile apps, and video games accessible to all users, featuring expert speakers from the WGBH National Center for Accessible Media and the AbleGamers Foundation. The webinar is now archived, as well as a document listing the links referenced in the presentation.
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Equal Opportunity Data Mining: National Statistics about Working Artists. The NEA just announced a new research tool on working artists. This online Arts Data Profiletallies the number of artists at the state and metro levels and breaks out key demographic characteristics, including artists with disabilities. For example, it highlights that nationally, 4 percent of all artists have disabilities, compared with 6 percent of the labor force. At 7 percent, the share of dancers and musicians with a disability is somewhat higher. The percentage of working musicians with a disability is comparatively high in Alaska (25 percent), Alabama (14 percent), Kentucky (16 percent), and Wisconsin (13 percent). Check the site for more interesting data on your state and how artists with disabilities fare.
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Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability (LEAD) Conference. Please mark your calendars for the LEAD Conference, which will be held August 21-23, 2013, in Washington, D.C. at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The Office of Accessibility will be holding a pre-conference peer session for regional and state Accessibility Coordinators. This is an opportunity to learn from experts in accessibility and share ideas with each other, with a strong emphasis on regional collaboration. The peer session will be held on Tuesday, August 20 from 1:00 – 5:30 P.M. and Wednesday, August 21 from 8:30 – 12 Noon, before the conference begins at 1:00 P.M. If you have questions, please contact Beth Bienvenu at bienvenub@arts.gov.
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VSA Funding Available for Organizations to Perform Arts, Education and Disability Programming.  The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Office of VSA and Accessibility, is seeking proposals from organizations  to carry out the following 7 (seven) VSA programs:  VSA Arts Connect All Professional Development Program,  VSA Arts Connect All Workshop/Residency Program, VSA Children’s Visual Art Discovery Program, VSA International Young Soloists: Music for Every Student Program, VSA Playwright Discovery Program, VSA Rosemary Kennedy Internship Program, and VSA Accessible Arts for Kids Program.  Contract amounts will vary but generally range between $2,000 and $25,000. Deadline is July 31, 2013.
June 2013 Updates from the NEA Office of Accessibility