Five years of seeing what the Montana Arts Council does for the state

Five years ago on Sunday, June 28, 2008, the Missoulian ran a front page story about my appointment by then Governor Brian Schweitzer to the Montana Arts Council with the headline, “Appointee a mystery to the arts community.” The article was a bit skeptical of my non-arts background and the potential for me to make a contribution.
Frankly, I was also skeptical of my appointment as I didn’t know any staff or board members and I was pretty much unaware of the council’s mission and work. Coming from the business world, I was also concerned about working with a government agency and the potential for bureaucratic thinking and behavior.
I’m happy to say my skepticism was unmerited. I found the staff of the Arts Council and other council board members to be professional, dedicated, creative and hardworking. The staff is dedicated and focused on helping artists and arts organizations be more economically successful, increasing opportunities for people across the state to participate in arts events and experiences, and working to enhance arts education programs in Montana schools.
Arni Fishbaugh, the council’s executive director, is an outstanding leader. Under her steady hand, the council’s work has been recognized as one of the most innovative, effective and creative arts councils in the nation. The council’s strategic plan is used as an example for other arts councils across the country.

Read more…


Five years of seeing what the Montana Arts Council does for the state

Artist Corky Clairmont teaches Missoula children about modern Indian art


Artist Corky Clairmont teaches Missoula children about modern Indian art

April 18, 2013 8:00 pm  • 

One minute, Susie Kayser’s fourth-grade class from Lowell School was peppering Corky Clairmont with questions and observations about “Split War Shield,” his mixed-media piece at the Missoula Art Museum.
The next minute, they were talking about the unique system of wildlife overpasses and underpasses on Highway 93 on the Flathead Reservation.
“Did you interpret the red beads (in the tire tread-like frame) as blood from turtles getting runned over?” one 9-year-old asked.  

Click Here for More….

Artist Corky Clairmont teaches Missoula children about modern Indian art

Photos are ‘Often All That Remains’

Jane Waggoner Deschner is a connoisseur of vintage snapshots.

The Billings artist collects them, collages them and stitches on them.

She orders them on eBay, and has a special connection at a flea market in New York City to acquire them.

All this effort isn’t to acquire vintage, artistic-looking photographs, though. She wants the pictures that no one else does.

“I want the mundane ones, all the ones that aren’t art, but are more like life,” Deschner said Wednesday. Around her, about 100 pieces comprising 75 artworks were being unloaded in the Missoula Art Museum’s Faith Pickton and Josephine Aresty Gallery.

Photos are ‘Often All That Remains’