Humanities Montana July 2014


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July 2014
connect with us:
Humanities Montana Coming to Billings — Thanks for Your Insights
Humanities Montana’s board and staff will gather at the beautiful Billings Public Library July 11-12 to dream the next five years for this organization.
Thanks to the 300 respondents to our constituent survey—your insights will prove invaluable.
Governor’s Humanities Award — Nominations Due August 1
Last Call! Humanities Montana seeks nominations for the 2015 Governor’s Humanities Awards, to be conferred at a February 19, 2015, ceremony in the State Capitol.
The humanities include the study of literature, history, Native American cultures, philosophy, languages, religious studies and other disciplines. The deadline is Friday, August 1.
Nominations should be no more than 1000 words and should address the nominee’s contributions to the humanities. Nominations for both individuals and organizations will be considered. Members of the Humanities Montana board and its staff are not eligible for consideration, and we cannot honor individuals posthumously.
Nominations should be sent to Governor’s Humanities Awards, Humanities Montana, 311 Brantly, Missoula, MT 59812. If you have questions, call 406-243-6022 or e-mail. For more information about the awards, visit our website.
Support the Festival of the Book
James Welch, Annie Proulx, Richard Ford, Pam Houston, James Lee Burke, Rick Bass, Mary Clearman Blew, Ivan Doig, William Kitteredge, Annick Smith….
These are just some of the writers brought to you by the Humanities Montana Festival of the Book over the past fifteen years.
We need your help to keep the tradition going. Since some of our funders cannot continue their support, we must depend upon donations from readers and writers throughout the Northwest.
Any amount is appreciated—and we can’t thank you enough. Hope to see you October 9-11 in Missoula!
Apply to Host Veterans’ Reading and Discussion Series
Thanks to an initiative from the National Endowment for the Humanities, we are introducing a new program designed for veterans and their families, Standing Together Montana, a reading and discussion program that uses powerful literature to start and keep sometimes difficult conversations going.
The series features discussions focused on stories, essays, personal accounts, and poetry; skilled discussion leaders; and convenient meeting sites.
This fall we’ll make Standing Together Montana available in four communities in Montana. If you know someone who might be interested in applying to host a Standing Together series there’s more information here, or contact Kim Anderson at Humanities Montana.
Montana at 150: Learn and Support
Learn about Montana’s beginnings and support the humanities in Montana.
Executive Director Ken Egan’s forthcoming book, Montana 1864, provides a panorama of people and events during the year of Montana’s creation as a territory. Henry Plummer, Calamity Jane, Plenty-coups, Crazy Horse, John Bozeman, Jim Bridger, Malcolm Clarke, Mary Ronan…. These are just some of the people you’ll meet in Montana 1864.
All author royalties will go to support the programs and grants of Humanities Montana.
Look for publication this September from Riverbend Publishing.
photo: Jim Bridger, courtesy of Montana Historical Society Research Center Photograph Archives, Helena, MT
Montana Conversations in the Parks
Gather around the campfire at your favorite state park to learn and reflect together! All summer long Humanities Montana and Montana State Parks offer programs on history, literature, the arts, and much more in over a dozen spectacular settings. July events include:
  • “Butte, the Cosmopolitan City of Montana!” with Tom Satterly at Lewis & Clark State Park on 7/4/2014
  • “The Legend of ‘Poker Joe’ Lean Elk” with Philip Burgess at Pictograph Cave State Park on 7/5/2014
  • “The Indian Education of Lewis & Clark” with Hal Stearns at Lewis & Clark State Park on 7/11/2014
  • “Living with the Land” with Louise Fischer at First Peoples Buffalo Jump State Park on 7/19/2014
  • “Tomahawks, Rifles, and Food for Thought” with Stephen Sylvester at Giant Springs State Park on 7/23/2014
  • “Tomahawks, Rifles, and Food for Thought” with Stephen Sylvester at Beavertail Hill State Park on 7/25/2014
  • “Tomahawks, Rifles, and Food for Thought” with Stephen Sylvester at Missouri Headwaters State Park on 7/26/2014
Check Montana State Parks or Humanities Montana for more dates and locations.
Hometown Humanities — Dillon & Lincoln County
Humanities Montana staff paid a final Hometown Humanities visit to Dillon in June and started the exciting process of planning a year’s worth of cultural programming in Lincoln County.
In Dillon, on June 24 we joined Beaverhead County Historical Museum director Lynn Giles and a group of Dillonites for a downtown historical walking tour and reception. The next morning HM staff met with community members to discuss new cultural ventures going forward.
Earlier in the month we joined with community leaders from Eureka, Libby, Troy, and the Yaak for a lunch meeting at the Lincoln County Public Library in Libby. We look forward to meeting in conference calls and in person over the summer to plan our year in Lincoln County.
If you’d like to be part of Lincoln County planning contact Kim Anderson.
Featured Digital Humanities: Montana Place Names Online
If you’re planning to explore Montana’s highways and byways this summer, you will undoubtedly encounter the history reflected in the names of many of the places you visit or pass by. The history of these names is well-documented in the published work by the Montana Historical Society, Montana Place Names from Alzada to Zortman.
You can also explore all of the contents of the book, including historic descriptions and photos, through the online version, which was developed and is maintained by the Montana State Library.
Through the online web application, you can search by place name, personal name, key word, or zoom to a particular area to learn the history of your desired location. Are you curious about all the place names associated with the Lewis and Clark expedition or the influence of the Northern Pacific Railroad? Perhaps you’ve made a friendly bet about the origins of the name of your favorite Montana mountain top.
You’re just a few short clicks from this information and so much more at Montana Place Names Online.
Thanks to Our Generous Supporters — June 2014
Organizations
Community Medical Center
Individuals
Bonnie Bowler** in honor of Printer Bowler
Antoine Brockman*
Victoria Cech*
Rita Collins*
Patty Dean*
Patricia Helvey
Chris Hopkins*
Bonnie Lambert
Kirby Lambert and Becca Kohl
William Marcus** and Cynthia Fudge
Twylla McPherson**
Jennie Pak
*Current Board and Staff Members
**Former Board and Staff Members
APPLY FOR A GRANT
The next deadline for regular, major, and film and digital grants is August 20th.
We will begin considering Opportunity Grant applications once again on October 1, for programs taking place November 1 or later.
Full information on grant guidelines and deadlines is available at the grants section of our website.
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Speakers Bureau requests on hold until September 1
Demand for our Speakers Bureau programs has been brisk and steady over the first six months of our fiscal year (beginning November 1), and so we must put a hold on applications for Speakers Bureau programs until September 1.
All previously scheduled programs will go forward as promised this spring, summer, and fall.
EVENT CALENDAR
Visit our online calendar to find out about upcoming Humanities Montana-sponsored events.
MONTANA AT 150
July 1864:
William Gladstone, former Hudson Bay carpenter, records, “I shall never forget the Fourth of July in Benton. Most of the men were from the Southern army and their hatred of the North expressed itself in an unmistakable way…. There were 1,500 men in Benton at that time and I saw such desperate characters as the James brothers among them. You can imagine the fights and rows that went on that day. With feelings of mutual hate, inflamed by bad whisky, the men of the North and South were only too eager to come to blows. It was hell upon earth for a time.”
On the fourteenth of July, the “Four Georgians” (only one of whom actually hails from that state) find gold in Last Chance Gulch. One of the prospectors, Reginald “Bob” Stanley, British by birth, will recall, “The stampeders coming in in 1864 were, first, a party of seven or eight; the second, about fifteen…. After these other parties continued to arrive daily—many of them only to stay for the night and leave in the early morning. One cause of their disgust was the small water supply….” By October enough people have migrated to this crossroads mining site to warrant naming the town “Helena.”
On the twenty-eighth of the month, General Alfred Sully leads an attack against the Hunkpapa Sioux and their allies at Killdeer Mountain in Dakota Territory. After killing at least 150 and burning the native camps to the ground, Sully’s troops enter the badlands on a forced march to the Yellowstone River. Their goal: Build a fort at the junction of the Powder and Yellowstone Rivers to provide protection for emigrants to the gold camps. The journey becomes a march through what Sully calls “hell with the fires burned out.” The fort will never be built, but the conflict between the Sioux and the Americans will continue.
photo: General Alfred Sully, courtesy of Montana Historical Society Research Center Photograph Archives, Helena, MT


Humanities Montana offers programs and grants for reflecting on the 150 year anniverary of Montana Territory. Please like Montana at 150 on Facebook and share history and information about this important anniverary.
TELL A FRIEND
Do you know someone who would like to receive eNews from Humanities Montana? Mail a link.
For more information…

Humanities Montana strives to enrich the lives of all Montanans by fostering inquiry and stimulating civil and informed conversations about the human experience.

Much more information on Humanities Montana and its many programs and services is available on our website.

Write us at:

Humanities Montana
311 Brantly
Missoula, MT, 59812-7848

or contact us via email, or call us at 406-243-6022, toll-free in Montana, 1-800-624-6001.

Humanities Montana July 2014

Humanities Montana June 2014



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June 2014
connect with us:
Nominate a Montanan for Governor’s Humanities Award
Humanities Montana seeks nominations for the 2015 Governor’s Humanities Awards, to be conferred at a February 19, 2015, ceremony in the State Capitol.
The humanities include the study of literature, history, Native American cultures, philosophy, languages, religious studies and other disciplines.
The deadline is Friday, August 1. Nominations should be no more than 1000 words and should address the nominee’s contributions to the humanities. Nominations for both individuals and organizations will be considered. Members of the Humanities Montana board and its staff are not eligible for consideration, and we cannot honor individuals posthumously.
Nominations should be sent to Governor’s Humanities Awards, Humanities Montana, 311 Brantly, Missoula, MT 59812. If you have questions, call 406-243-6022 or e-mail. For more information about the Awards, visit our website.
Help the Humanities Grow
Spring is the time for new growth and new possibilities. It’s a perfect time to help the humanities in Montana flourish. You can donate to Humanities Montana’s Annual Fund—any amount is deeply appreciated.
In 2013, over 10,000 people across the state took part in Humanities Montana’s Speakers Bureau conversations, over 9,000 students participated in our youth programs, and about 24,000 Montanans discussed and celebrated literature at regional book festivals.
With your help, we can see those numbers grow this year.
Last Call: Tell Us What You Think
We’d love to hear how you think Humanities Montana can best serve the state. Our board and staff will meet in Billings this July to craft a strategic plan for the next five years.
Inform the conversation by completing our 2014 constituent survey and sharing your perspectives on types of programs, kinds of audiences we should reach, how much funding should go to grants, whether your county has enough humanities programs, and more.
Deadline for completing the survey: June 15.
Montana at 150: Learn and Support!
Learn about Montana’s beginnings and support the humanities in Montana!
Executive Director Ken Egan’s forthcoming book, Montana 1864, provides a panorama of people and events during the year of Montana’s creation as a territory. Henry Plummer, Calamity Jane, Plenty-coups, Crazy Horse, John Bozeman, Jim Bridger, Malcolm Clarke, Mary Ronan…. These are just some of the people you’ll meet in Montana 1864.
All author royalties will go to support the programs and grants of Humanities Montana!
Look for publication this September from Riverbend Publishing.
photo: Chief Plenty-coups, courtesy of Montana Historical Society Research Center Photograph Archives, Helena, MT
Montana Conversations in the Parks
Gather around the campfire at your favorite state park to learn and reflect together! All summer long Humanities Montana and Montana State Parks offer programs on history, literature, the arts, and much more in over a dozen spectacular settings. June events include:
  • “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?” with Bill Rossiter at Bannack State Park on 6/14/2014
  • “How We Miss Them: Ghostly Gatherings from MT” with Ellen Baumler at Beavertail Hill State Park on 6/14/2014
  • “Homestead Dreams” with Hal Stearns at Giant Springs State Park Great Falls on 6/19/2014
  • “Penny Postcards and Prairie Flowers” with Philip Burgess at Lewis & Clark State Park on 6/20/2014
  • “A Vacuum of Law: Montana’s Vigilantes in 1863-1864” with Carol Buchanan at Bannack State Park on 6/21/2014
  • “The Dog Soldier Ledgerbook: A Source for Indian History” with Richard Ellis at Pictograph Cave State Park on 6/28/2014
Check Montana State Parks or Humanities Montana for more dates and locations.
Hometown Humanities — Dillon
Last September we kicked off Hometown Humanities-Dillon with a walking tour of one historically rich downtown block (thanks to Lynn Giles and the Beaverhead County Museum) and a conversation about what role the humanities played in the life of the community.
Now it’s June and we’re planning a celebration of the year and a conversation about what comes next. Join us June 24th as we close the loop by touring another block of historic downtown Dillon, ending up at the museum for refreshments. And we encourage you to meet Humanities Montana staff for coffee the next morning (June 25th, 9:00 am) at the Sweetwater Café where we’ll discuss ideas for the years to come.
Featured Digital Humanities: Of Sage and Stone
This spring, the Montana Preservation Alliance launched an innovative new website and iPhone app: Of Sage & Stone: Back Roads Guide to Southwest Montana Heritage & Culture. The guide takes travelers down back roads and scenic byways in a seven-county area, leading to artists’ studios, galleries, museums, historic sites and charming small towns unique to this spectacular stretch of the Rocky Mountains.
Travelers and history lovers can browse online at ofsageandstone.com or download the iPhone app from iTunes. It’s an easy way to get to know Southwest Montana—the way that locals have always known it. To learn more about the Montana Preservation Alliance, visit their website or like them on Facebook.
Indian Relay Nominated for Four Regional Emmys
Indian Relay, a film supported by grants from Humanities Montana, has been nominated for Northwest Regional Emmys in the prestigious Historical—Cultural Documentary category, as well as in the craft categories of Director—Post Production, Editor, and Photography.
Winners will be announced at the June 7th awards ceremony in Seattle, but in the meantime, let’s celebrate all who were involved in creating this important, engaging film. For more information about the Emmy competition and the nominations, visit this site.
Thanks to Our Generous Supporters — May 2014
Organizations
Blaine County Library
Butte-Silver Bow Public Library
Dennis and Phyllis Washington Foundation
Lewis And Clark NHT Interpretive Center
Montana City School
One Montana
Virginia City Preservation Alliance
Individuals
Richard Baker
Ken* and Terry Egan
Linda Hoines
David Irion*
Brian Kahn
Tim Lehman**
Twylla McPherson** in memory of Louise Cross
Chérie Newman
Virginia and Albert Niccolucci
Hal Stearns**
Stephen Sylvester**
*Current Board and Staff Members
**Former Board and Staff Members
APPLY FOR A GRANT
The next deadline for regular, major, and film and digital grants is August 20th.
We will begin considering Opportunity Grant applications once again on October 1, for programs taking place November 1 or later.
Full information on grant guidelines and deadlines is available at the grants section of our website.
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Speakers Bureau requests on hold until September 1
Demand for our Speakers Bureau programs has been brisk and steady over the first six months of our fiscal year (beginning November 1), and so we must put a hold on applications for Speakers Bureau programs until September 1.
All previously scheduled programs will go forward as promised this spring, summer, and fall.
EVENT CALENDAR
Visit our online calendar to find out about upcoming Humanities Montana-sponsored events.
MONTANA AT 150
June 1864:
Abram Voorhees, 40-year-old Michigan farmer, joins the first wagon train to travel what became known as the Bozeman Trail.
The large party includes many looking for a gold strike on the Bighorn River. When those dreams fail to materialize, the expedition fractures, and Voorhees becomes new leader of the group pressing on for Virginia City. Along the way they meet Jim Bridger, guiding his own train, whom Voorhees describes as “a tough looking old chap.”
Shortly after arriving in Montana’s mining metropolis, Voorhees promptly begins his return journey home. He concludes, “[T]he expenses toil & privations incident to a trip to the mining region are not justified by the real condition of things there.”


Humanities Montana offers programs and grants for reflecting on the 150 year anniverary of Montana Territory. Please like Montana at 150 on Facebook and share history and information about this important anniverary.
TELL A FRIEND
Do you know someone who would like to receive eNews from Humanities Montana? Mail a link.
For more information…

Humanities Montana strives to enrich the lives of all Montanans by fostering inquiry and stimulating civil and informed conversations about the human experience.

Much more information on Humanities Montana and its many programs and services is available on our website.

Write us at:

Humanities Montana
311 Brantly
Missoula, MT, 59812-7848

or contact us via email, or call us at 406-243-6022, toll-free in Montana, 1-800-624-6001.

Humanities Montana June 2014

Humanities Montana May 2014


Having trouble viewing this email? Click here
May 2014
connect with us:
Tell Us What You Think — Take the Survey
Yes, we need to hear from you about how Humanities Montana can best serve Montana.
Our board and staff will meet in Billings this July to craft a strategic plan for the next five years. We invite you to inform the conversation by completing our 2014 constituent survey and sharing your perspectives on future programming, outreach, funding allocation and more. Thanks!
Two Ways to Help Humanities Flourish: Annual Fund and Give LOCAL Missoula!
Spring is the time for new growth, new possibilities, and so it’s a perfect time to help the humanities in Montana flourish. Please donate to Humanities Montana’s Annual Fund—any amount is deeply appreciated. Look for our 2013 Annual Report in your mailbox soon, a handy update on all things Humanities Montana.
And Missoulians have a special opportunity to contribute to our work: participate in Give LOCAL Missoula! on Tuesday, May 6. We’ve set a goal of $5,000 on that single day—let’s make it happen! And thanks for everything you do for the humanities in Montana.
Nominate a Montanan for Governor’s Humanities Award
Humanities Montana seeks nominations for the 2015 Governor’s Humanities Awards, to be conferred at a February 19, 2015, ceremony in the state capitol.
The humanities include the study of literature, history, philosophy, languages, religious studies, Native American studies and other disciplines. The deadline is Friday, August 1.
Nominations should be no more than 1000 words and should address the nominee’s contributions to the humanities. Nominations for both individuals and organizations will be considered. Members of the Humanities Montana board and its staff are not eligible for consideration, and we cannot honor individuals posthumously.
Nominations should be sent to Governor’s Humanities Awards, Humanities Montana, 311 Brantly, Missoula, MT 59812. If you have questions, call 406-243-6022 or e-mail. For more information about the Awards, visit our website.
New on MAP: Fools Crow
As the final addition to our Montana Authors Project in commemoration of Montana at 150, we have just completed a map of James Welch’s Fools Crow.
This literary masterpiece traces the life of a promising young Pikuni Blackfeet during a time of increasing pressure from white emigrants in Montana. Welch works magic by immersing readers in the lived experience of a tribal nation on the verge of a catastrophic event, the Marias Massacre in 1870. The novel concludes, however, with belief in the power of stories to sustain a people in the face of such violence.
Jump to the MAP, visit key settings in the novel, and relish Welch’s extraordinary prose.
Letters About Literature
Congratulations to the state winners! The ability to write well is an incredibly important skill and these students showed talent and heart:
Level I, grades 4-6
  • First place — Caitlyn Harbin from Galata wrote to Susan E. Harris, author of The United States Pony Club Manual of Horsemanship
  • Second place — Corinn Morgan from Missoula wrote to Lemony Snicket, author of The Series of Unfortunate Events
  • Third place — Maddie Sramek from Whitefish wrote to Lois Lowry, author of Gathering Blue
Level II, grades 7-8
  • First place — Clara Stroh from Bozeman wrote to Theodore Taylor, author of The Bomb
  • Second place — Tequila Helland from Columbia Falls wrote to Kathryn Stockett, author of The Help
  • Third place — a student from Bigfork wrote to Veronica Roth, author of Divergent
Level III, grades 9-10
  • First place — Shiloh Skillen-Robison from Hysham wrote to Stanley Gordon West, author of Blind Your Ponies
  • Second place — Meredith Stolte from Columbia Falls wrote to Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Third place tie — Madeline Lorang from Bigfork wrote to Tina Fey, author of Bossypants
  • Third place tie — Carter Groneberg from Roundup wrote to Tom Groneberg, author of The Secret Life of Cowboys
Hometown Humanities Dillon — A Spring Riot of Programs!
May 13 — A Savage Appraisal: Thomas Savage Revisits His Hometown with Alan Weltzien. From Thomas Savage’s second novel, Lona Hanson, to his final one, Hotel on the Corner of Rife and Pacific, Savage frequently rewrote Dillon. His harsh appraisal and photographic memory provide a bracing portrait of a slowly changing town. Join scholar Alan Weltzien for a conversation that moves beyond Savage’s portrayal of his childhood home and explores Dillon today. Sweetwater Coffee, 7:30 pm, coffee and cookies provided.
May 19-30 — Montana Women’s History Exhibit, a multi-panel travelling exhibit on the history of women’s rights in Montana in honor of the centennial of woman suffrage in the state. This exhibit was created by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at the University of Montana and funded by Humanities Montana with support from the Montana State Library and the Montana Historical Society.
May 27 — Taking Action: A Political History of Women in Montana with Diane Sands, independent scholar on women’s history and Montana state representative. Women have always been actors in Montana’s political history. “Taking Action” surveys the role of Montana women beginning with suffrage campaigns during territorial days through their 1914 victory granting women the vote. Sands explores the political work of diverse groups, such as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the Montana Negro Women’s Clubs, on behalf of women and families. The presentation concludes with the role of the League of Women Voters in the 1972 Constitutional Convention, where nineteen women served as delegates and leaders. Depot Theatre, 7:00 pm.
Featured Digital Humanities: Montana Office of Tourism
Montana’s Office of Tourism offers rich humanities content on many of its sites, but here are two of particular interest to Humanities Montana’s friends:
#MontanaMoment
http://montanamoment.tumblr.com

The Office of Tourism uses this tumblr page to curate excellent, user-generated photography by mining the hashtag #montanamoment on various social platforms. Tumblr users can expect to experience engaging, shareable and informative content about plants and wildlife, history, famous quotations, and of course Montana’s rich and varied places.
Lively Times
http://www.livelytimes.com
LivelyTimes.com is Montana’s complete arts and entertainment calendar. It features a searchable database of readings and events, as well as music, concerts, theater, dance, recreation, art exhibits and more.
Thanks to Our Generous Supporters — April 2014
Organizations
American Association of University Women – Glendive
American Association of University Women – Miles City
Flathead Valley Community College
Garnet Preservation Association
Jefferson County Museum
Lincoln County Public Library
Montana Storytelling Roundup
Mountain Home Montana
Rosebud County Library
Wibaux Chamber of Commerce
Individuals
Richard Baker
Sandra Barker
Dave Caserio
Louise Fischer
Neal Lewing
Twylla McPherson**
Craig Naylor
*Current Board and Staff Members
**Former Board and Staff Members
GRANT DEADLINES
To ensure adequate funding is available in the latter part of the year, we have suspended our May 20 regular grant deadline.
The next deadline for regular, major, and film and digital grants is August 20th.
Further, we cannot consider Opportunity Grant applications until October 1.
Full information on grant guidelines and deadlines is available the grants section of our website.
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Demand for our Speakers Bureau programs has been brisk and steady over the first six months of our fiscal year (beginning November 1), and so we must put a hold on applications for Speakers Bureau programs until September 1.
All previously scheduled programs will go forward as promised this spring, summer, and fall.
EVENT CALENDAR
Visit our online calendar to find out about upcoming Humanities Montana-sponsored events.
MONTANA AT 150
May 1864:
On May 26, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Territory of Montana into existence. Naming the new territory proved a challenge for Congress. After considering names such as Shoshone (hint of Copperhead sympathy for the Confederacy), Jefferson (a nod to a founder of the Democratic Party), and Douglas (in honor of both Stephen Douglas, a prominent Democrat, and Frederick Douglass, a prominent abolitionist), Congress settled on “Montana,” Spanish and Latin for “mountain.”
The name echoed a phrase attributed to Indians in the region, “Land of Shining Mountains.” It was a very close call on whether the Bitterroot Valley would be included in the new territory, but with the blessing of Idaho Territory’s governor, Montana encompassed this lush, beautiful valley.


Humanities Montana offers programs and grants for reflecting on the 150 year anniverary of Montana Territory. Please like Montana at 150 on Facebook and share history and information about this important anniverary.
TELL A FRIEND
Do you know someone who would like to receive eNews from Humanities Montana? Mail a link.
For more information…

Humanities Montana strives to enrich the lives of all Montanans by fostering inquiry and stimulating civil and informed conversations about the human experience.

Much more information on Humanities Montana and its many programs and services is available on our website.

Write us at:

Humanities Montana
311 Brantly
Missoula, MT, 59812-7848

or contact us via email, or call us at 406-243-6022, toll-free in Montana, 1-800-624-6001.

Humanities Montana May 2014

Humanities Montana April 2014


Having trouble viewing this email? Click here
March 2014
connect with us:
Attend NEH Grant Workshop April 9 in Missoula
An application-writing workshop will be offered by the National Endowment for the Humanities in the President’s Room, Brantly Hall at the University of Montana on Wednesday, April 9 from 8:00 am to 12 noon.
Learn about NEH’s many funding opportunities and observe a mock review panel, helpful for understanding how to craft the most competitive grant proposal.
If you are planning to attend, please contact Amy Kinch at 406-243-5897. Humanities Montana is a proud affiliate of NEH and we look forward to welcoming you on the 9th.
Nominate a Montanan for Governor’s Humanities Award
Humanities Montana seeks nominations for the 2015 Governor’s Humanities Awards, to be conferred at a February 19, 2015, ceremony in the state capitol.
The humanities include the study of literature, history, philosophy, languages, religious studies, Native American studies and other disciplines. The deadline is Friday, August 1.
Nominations should be no more than 1000 words and should address the nominee’s contributions to the humanities. Nominations for both individuals and organizations will be considered. Members of the Humanities Montana board and its staff are not eligible for consideration, and we cannot honor individuals posthumously.
Nominations should be sent to Governor’s Humanities Awards, Humanities Montana, 311 Brantly, Missoula, MT 59812. If you have questions, call 406-243-6022 or e-mail. For more information about the Awards, visit our website.
April is National Poetry Month—Host Montana’s Poet Laureate!
April is not always the cruelest month—it’s also a time to celebrate National Poetry Month.
Montana has a rich lyric tradition, and you can host one of the gifted representatives of that tradition, the state’s poet laureate, Tami Haaland, through Humanities Montana’s Speakers Bureau. Several of Tami’s engaging poems can be found at the poet laureate site on mt.gov.
New on MAP:
All But the Waltz
In honor of Montana’s 150th birthday, Humanities Montana is featuring five new titles on the Montana Authors Project, and we’re inviting you to join a conversation about each title as it’s added.
Now up: Mary Clearman Blew’s All But the Waltz. Published in 1991, Blew’s autobiographic essays tell poignant stories of life in central Montana starting with her great-grandparents’ arrival in 1882. Using scraps of writing they left behind, Blew explores the mystery of family and the striking truth that we never truly know even the people closest to us.
Find important geographic locations in the story on MAP and join the conversation on Facebook.
Humanities Montana’s Endowment Reaches Magic Number
Thanks to your generosity, Humanities Montana’s endowment has reached $100,000, providing us with additional funds for programs and grants all over the state.
Please consider making a planned gift to our endowment to assure ever more opportunities for Montanans to learn and reflect together. Visit our planned giving page for much more information about this giving opportunity—we’d love to add you to our Legacy Society. And thanks again!
Dillon Hotbed of Humanities
Last month over 50 Dillonites turned out for a free showing of the PBS documentary “Pete Seeger, the Power of Song” and took part in a community sing-a-long.
On April 9, narrative historian, writer and photographer Will Abbot will present “Firearms of the American Frontier Experience,” a talk about the history and development of firearms by the emigrants, soldiers and explorers who settled the West.
And on May 13, Dillon’s own Alan Weltzien will present “A Savage Appraisal: Thomas Savage Revisits His Hometown,” using the author’s often bracing portrait of a slowly changing town to spur discussion of community values and self-critique.
Visit our website for event start times and venues, and more information about the Hometown Humanities program.
Featured Digital Humanities: MHS’s Women’s History Matters
Created as part of a commemoration of the hundredth anniversary of women’s suffrage in Montana, Women’s History Matters is designed to help the Montana Historical Society promote an increased appreciation and understanding of the role of women in the Treasure State’s past.
Explore this site to find bibliographies of manuscript collections, oral histories, government documents, pamphlets, magazine articles, videos and DVDs, and published material; over 130 articles published in Montana The Magazine of Western History to download and read; information on oral histories, including what’s been collected and how to conduct your own; educator resources, including lesson plans; and much more.
Other Women’s History Matters outreach includes the Montana Women’s History Matters Facebook page. The project’s parent organization, the Montana Historical Society, also has a very active Facebook page.
Grants Awarded:
March 2014
2014 Mullan Road Conference, Friends of Two Rivers Inc., Milltown, $700. Funding for speakers at the May 2-4 conference exploring the stories surrounding the military wagon road built by Lt. John Mullan.
Annual Museums Association of Montana Conference, Museums Association of Montana, Helena, $1,000. Support for the annual conference which includes lectures, tours, and workshops.
Distinguished Lecture in Native American Literature: Richard Littlebear, Carroll College, Helena, $775. Honorarium and expenses to bring noted Native American writer Richard Littlebear for student and teacher workshops and a public lecture.
Wedsworth Book Discussion 2014-2015, Wedsworth Memorial Library, Cascade, $900. Eight book discussions hosted by Penny Hughes-Briant.
In The Crucible of Change: Filmed Oral Histories, Montana Tech Highlands College, Butte, $5,000. Thirty televised interviews with Montana history-makers from 1965-1980, hosted by Evan Barrett.
The Medicine Tree: A Catalyst for Dialogue, Bitterroot College, UM, Hamilton, $4,984. Support for community dialogue surrounding the Salish culture and Montana history related to the Bitterroot Valley and the Medicine Tree area south of Hamilton.
Nez Perce Trail Traveling Exhibit, Ravalli County Museum, Hamilton, $3,399. Funding to support a gathering of Nez Perce tribal members and elders, representatives from the Salish tribe, partner organizations and community members to showcase the Nez Perce lifeways pre-1877, the story of the 1877 Nez Perce flight, and the contemporary living culture.
Wiki Write 2014, Montana State University-Bozeman Library, Bozeman, $1,000. Support for a workshop teaching Wikipedia editing and writing skills to local historians.
The More Indian You Are, The More Cowboy I’ll Be, University of Montana, Missoula, $893. Funding to bring nationally recognized Native American film critics Angelica Lawson and Theodore Van Alst to a public panel discussion.
Community Storytelling Partnership, Billings West High School, Billings, $1,000. Support for Billings high school juniors to partner with the Western Heritage Center, MontanaPBS, and the Billings Public Library to explore the legacy of Not in our Town after twenty years.
Oral History of Louie Adams, Sentinel High School, Missoula, $800. Sentinel high school students will create an oral history of Louie Adams, a noted Bitterroot Salish elder.
Mark Stevens Lecture, Montana Museum of Art & Culture, Missoula, $800. Funding to bring Pulitzer-Prize-winning author and critic Mark Stevens to Montana to engage in a roundtable discussion with Montana artist Sandra Dal Poggetto.
Out At The Library Exhibit, Butte Silver Bow Public Library, Butte, $800. Support to bring the “Out at the Library” exhibit from the San Francisco Public Library to Butte to coincide with Gay Pride Month in June, in combination with an art show and book discussion.
Thanks to Our Generous Supporters — March 2014
Organizations
A.A.U.W. — Glendive
Community Celebration
Foundant Technologies
Friends of the Sheridan Public Library
Great Falls Public Library
Heritage Museum
League of Women Voters of Bozeman
Montana Cultural and Aesthetic Trust
Phillips County Historical Society
Red Lodge Friends of the Library
Touchmark Assisted Living
Upper Swan Valley Historical Society
Individuals
Richard Baker
Philip Burgess
Dave Caserio
Twylla McPherson**
Jennie Pak
Hal Stearns**
*Current Board and Staff Members
**Former Board and Staff Members
GRANT DEADLINES
To ensure adequate funding is available in the latter part of the year, we have suspended our May 20 regular grant deadline.
The next deadline for regular, major, and film and digital grants is August 20th.
Further, we cannot consider Opportunity Grant applications until October 1.
Full information on grant guidelines and deadlines is available the grants section of our website.
EVENT CALENDAR
Visit our online calendar to find out about upcoming Humanities Montana-sponsored events.
MONTANA AT 150
April 1864:
John Owen hands President Lincoln a letter nominating Sidney Edgerton as Montana’s first territorial governor.
Owen has lived in the Bitterroot Valley for thirteen years, having purchased St. Mary’s Mission to create Fort Owen. An ardent Union Democrat, he opposes the President’s prosecution of the Civil War but recognizes the virtues of a new territory.
He will return to his beloved Bitterroot home by joining Jim Bridger’s second wagon train along the west side of the Big Horn Mountains in September, 1864.


Humanities Montana offers programs and grants for reflecting on the 150 year anniverary of Montana Territory. Please like Montana at 150 on Facebook and share history and information about this important anniverary.
TELL A FRIEND
Do you know someone who would like to receive eNews from Humanities Montana? Mail a link.
For more information…

Humanities Montana strives to enrich the lives of all Montanans by fostering inquiry and stimulating civil and informed conversations about the human experience.

Much more information on Humanities Montana and its many programs and services is available on our website.

Write us at:

Humanities Montana
311 Brantly
Missoula, MT, 59812-7848

or contact us via email, or call us at 406-243-6022, toll-free in Montana, 1-800-624-6001.

Humanities Montana April 2014

Humanities Montana March 2014


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March 2014
connect with us:
Hometown Humanities Looks Ahead to Lincoln County!
Humanities Montana recently invited communities interested in the Hometown Humanities program to submit an application to be chosen as the year-three site.
Board and staff were amazed at the number and quality of applications we received, and the board had a very hard decision to make at Humanities Montana’s early February meeting. But we’re pleased to announce that the site for Hometown Humanities Year Three will be…a county!
Hats off to Jessie Pate of the Lincoln County Public Libraries and Sarah Barrick of Libby Public Schools who submitted an impressive proposal with the help of representatives from Eureka and Troy. We’re looking forward to beginning our work with the communities of Lincoln County in early summer. And we encourage all the other communities that applied for the Hometown Humanities program to continue to work with us on programming going forward.
And the Humanities Flourish in Dillon
In the meantime, Hometown Humanities is in full swing in Dillon. On January 30th we hosted a community conversation on water challenges in cooperation with another statewide organization, One Montana. The gathering attracted over 90 community members—ranchers and farmers, environmental scientists and government regulators, students and teachers. Early in February Chrysti the Wordsmith gave presentations to eight high school classes as well as a full house evening program at the Depot Theater.
Coming up: March 20, 7:00 pm, Depot Theater, a free showing of the documentary “Pete Seeger, the Power of Song” followed by a community sing-a-long; “Firearms of the American Frontier” with Will Abbot, April 9-10; and, in May, a series of community conversations and another of the popular downtown Dillon walking history tours.
For more information keep checking the Hometown Humanities page on our website.
Find Home in
This House of Sky
In honor of Montana’s 150th birthday, Humanities Montana is featuring five new titles on the Montana Authors Project, and we’re inviting you to join a conversation about each title as it’s added.
Next up: Ivan Doig’s This House of Sky. Published in 1978, Doig’s beautifully written memoir of a hardscrabble childhood on ranches and in small towns in central Montana depicts a way of life that has all but vanished from America. Go here to locate yourself in key moments in the story.
Then jump on our Facebook site and participate in a digital conversation about Doig’s moving memoir.
Indian Education Programs Free for Schools
Teachers can host informative, engaging speakers on Indian histories and cultures through Humanities Montana’s Speakers in the Schools. These programs are free to schools and require a simple application. For much more information, visit our website, or contact Kim Anderson.
Special thanks to the Montana Office of Public Instruction Indian Education division for helping making these programs possible.
Thanks to Foundant Technologies for Support
Foundant Technologies of Bozeman has generously provided Humanities Montana a $2,500 gift to support the conference “Art Matters” in Bozeman March 21-22. Foundant manages our online grant and program application system. We’re proud to work with an outstanding Montana company.
Poets’ Congress at Big Sky March 8
You can participate in a Poets’ Congress at the new Warren Miller Performing Arts Center at Big Sky. Montana’s poet laureate Tami Haaland will be joined by Colorado’s poet laureate David Mason, former Montana poet laureate Henry Real Bird, slam poet Linds Sanders, and performance poet Dave Caserio. Singer songwriter Martha Scanlan will also play.
Prior to the poetry event at 7:30, the student art and poetry exhibition “Pictures and a Thousand Words” opens, featuring the photography of senior Anna Middleton and poetry from the students of the district. Poetic fortune cookies, interactive poetry games, and more make for a fun event in a coffee shop atmosphere.
NEH Summer Seminars and Workshops for Teachers— Deadline March 4
Each year, the National Endowment for the Humanities offers tuition-free opportunities for school, college, and university educators to study a variety of humanities topics. Stipends of $1,200-$3,900 help cover expenses for these one- to five-week programs. These can be transformative experiences as you immerse yourself in a topic of uncommon interest and spend quality time with wonderful colleagues from around the country.
For more information and application instructions, visit this website and navigate through the many wonderful learning possibilities.
Featured Digital Humanities: Greater Montana Foundation
Montana is blessed with many humanities organizations making effective use of digital technology to share the insights and joys of the humanities. For each of the next eight months one site will be featured to highlight these organizations’ good work and to encourage further experimentation with digital humanities.
This month’s featured site: The Greater Montana Foundation’s archive of interviews with fifteen influential broadcasters. The Legacy Broadcaster Initiative was created to provide a lasting legacy of Montana broadcasters who have devoted their professional lives to better serve their communities through quality programming, public service, professionalism and integrity. Throughout the years, the Greater Montana Foundation will add to this list, and create new interviews with past and current broadcasters who continue this tradition of community service and excellence.
Grants Awarded:
February 2014
Buffalo & Biscuits: Squashing Myths about Food in Indian Country, Cynthia Ott, Saint Louis, $4,000. Support for a research fellowship that explores the food history of the Crow reservation from the 1880s to the present to help bring to light the dynamics and mechanisms by which American Indians have reconciled their own experiences in a modern globalized world.
Gender, Culture, and the Politics of Food on the Northern Borderlands, 1860-1940, Mary Murphy, Bozeman, $4,000. Support for a research fellowship that examines questions of the political and cultural meanings of food in the borderlands of the Canadian and U.S. prairie and intermountain West.
People before the Park: The Kootenai and Blackfeet before Glacier National Park, Montana Historical Society, Helena, $6,000. Support for the publication of People Before the Park, a book about the cultural knowledge, spiritual beliefs and seasonal travels of the Kootenai and Blackfeet tribes whose ancestral homes include the area that is now Glacier National Park.
Home Ground Radio, Artemis Common Ground, Helena, $8,000. Support for a half-hour, weekly interview program that presents a cumulative portrait of our Western culture in transition through non-confrontational exploration of changes and choices we face as a state.
Reflections West Years 5–7, Western Heritage Center, Billings, $7,000. Support for a series of 26 five-minute radio segments in which a diverse range of people contribute personal stories about the West paired with short passages of literature or history.
The Write Question, Montana Public Radio, Missoula, $6,000. Support for a half-hour weekly radio program that features the literature of and writers from the West and connects regional authors with readers, students, and a worldwide audience.
Confluence of Stories: Milltown State Park Interpretive Project, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (Montana State Parks), Helena, $8,000. Support for interpretive content that explores the deep human history at the restored confluence of the Blackfoot and Clark Fork rivers in the new Milltown State Park.
Montana Women’s History Exhibit, Women’s and Gender Studies Program, Missoula, $7,500. Support for a traveling exhibit on the history of woman suffrage and women’s rights in Montana in honor of the centennial of woman suffrage in the state. The exhibit and guest speakers will be available to organizations throughout Montana.
Traditional Ecological Knowledge, National Coalition Building Institute, Missoula, $4,000. Support for two gatherings of Blackfeet woman healers to work on sharing and rebuilding traditional ecological and medicinal knowledge of Montana.
Climbing Mountains in a Skirt, Elling House Arts and Humanities Center, Virginia City, $600. Support for a series of lectures and discussions celebrating Montana’s 150th anniversary and the contributions of notable women in Montana history.
The Poets’ Congress, Warren Miller Performing Arts Center, Big Sky, $980. Support for a gathering hosted by two poet laureates that focuses on poetry and its role in a contemporary setting and aims to increase visibility, accessibility, and community around the power of words.
Local Authors Reading Discussion, Preston Hot Springs Library, Hot Springs, $1000. Support for a reading and discussion group focused on regional Montana authors at the Preston Hot Springs Library every other Friday, February through May 2014.
Leave a Legacy for the Humanities
Consider giving legacy support to the humanities through a planned gift. To learn more about legacy gifts visit our planned giving page and visit Legacy Montana, an organization that promotes planned philanthropy in the state.
Thanks to Our Generous Supporters — February 2014
Organizations
Foundant Technologies
Friends Of The Butte Archives
Friends Of The Sheridan Public Library
Frontier Gateway Museum
Great Falls Public Library
Heritage Museum
League of Women Voters of Bozeman
Lewis And Clark Trail Heritage Foundation,
Crimson Bluffs Chapter
Lewis And Clark Trail Heritage Foundation,
Gates of the Mountain Chapter
North Lake County Public Library
Wibaux County Museum
Individuals
Connie Daugherty*
Rudolf Dietrich
Samantha Dwyer*
Tami Haaland
Bill Jones*
Linda Karell*
Tom Kotynski*
Judy Mathre
Twylla McPherson**
Carmen McSpadden*
Alice Meister*
Aaron Pruitt*
Will Rawn*
Tobin Shearer*
Ed Stickney
Carla Wambach
*Current Board and Staff Members
**Former Board and Staff Members
GRANT DEADLINES
The next deadline for regular grants (under $5000) is May 20th.
Visit the grants section of our website for full information about grant guidelines and deadlines.
EVENT CALENDAR
Visit our online calendar to find out about upcoming Humanities Montana-sponsored events.
MONTANA AT 150
March 1864:
James Stuart leads his second expedition to the confluence of the Big Horn and Yellowstone Rivers. His party of 75 will be baffled by unyielding winter weather and will retreat to Bannack without making a gold strike. This failure will end the Stuart brothers’ attempt to open the Yellowstone country to white settlement.
Johnny Grant’s nine children are baptized into the Catholic faith in the Deer Lodge Valley. Grant lives at the center of a vast trading network that includes mining camps, emigrants on the Oregon Trail, and many Indian nations, especially the Metis famous for their Red River carts.
On March 19, Charlie Russell, Montana’s beloved artist, is born in St. Louis.


Humanities Montana offers programs and grants for reflecting on the 150 year anniverary of Montana Territory. Please like Montana at 150 on Facebook and share history and information about this important anniverary.
TELL A FRIEND
Do you know someone who would like to receive eNews from Humanities Montana? Mail a link.
For more information…

Humanities Montana strives to enrich the lives of all Montanans by fostering inquiry and stimulating civil and informed conversations about the human experience.

Much more information on Humanities Montana and its many programs and services is available on our website.

Write us at:

Humanities Montana
311 Brantly
Missoula, MT, 59812-7848

or contact us via email, or call us at 406-243-6022, toll-free in Montana, 1-800-624-6001.

Humanities Montana March 2014

Humanities Montana News


February 2014
connect with us:
Humanities Montana Meets
in Helena, February 6-8
Join Humanities Montana’s board and staff when we meet in Helena. Our gathering will begin with a free public presentation on “Ghost Towns of the Rockies” at the Montana Historical Society on Thursday, February 6 at 6:30pm. Thanks to the Historical Society for co-sponsoring this event.
The board will then meet at the Holter Museum of Art on Friday and Saturday, February 7-8, beginning at 8:30 am each day. Hope to see you in the Capitol City!
Journey through
The Big Sky
In honor of Montana’s 150th birthday, Humanities Montana will be featuring five new titles on the Montana Authors Project, and we’re inviting all of you to join a conversation about each title as it’s added.
Next up: A. B. Guthrie Jr.’s The Big Sky. Go here to navigate through the book by clicking on map points signifying crucial moments in the story.
Then jump on our Facebook site and participate in a digital conversation about Guthrie’s iconic novel.
Indian Education Programs Free to Teachers
Teachers can host informative, engaging speakers on Indian histories and cultures through Humanities Montana’s Speakers in the Schools. These programs are free to schools and require a simple application. For much more information, visit our website, or contact Kim Anderson.
Our thanks to the Montana Office of Public Instruction’s Indian Education Division for making these programs possible.
NEH Summer Seminars and Workshops for Teachers — Deadline March 4
Each year, the National Endowment for the Humanities offers tuition-free opportunities for school, college, and university educators to study a variety of humanities topics. Stipends of $1200-$3900 help cover expenses for these one- to five-week programs.
These can be transformative experiences as you immerse yourself in a topic of uncommon interest and spend quality time with wonderful colleagues from around the country.
For more information and application instructions, visit the NEH website and navigate through the many wonderful learning possibilities.
Enjoy the Humanities in Montana State Parks
Thanks to Montana State Parks for once again partnering with Humanities Montana on providing high-quality, entertaining humanities presentations in the parks this coming summer. Look for wonderful learning opportunities in our park system while you enjoy the glorious scenery.
50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act — Read and Discuss
In a year of major anniversaries (100th anniversary of Montana women’s right to vote, 150th anniversary of Montana Territory), let’s not forget the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. The Montana State Library is sponsoring programs focused on discussing the creation and legacy of this landmark act. For much more information about these opportunities to learn and reflect together, contact Lauren McMullen at the State Library.
Bring REFLECT to Your Organization
Reflect: Community Readings & Conversations is a statewide program available to nonprofits, government and community groups. The program aims to facilitate useful, lively discussion about personal and organizational values, and about how civic and service-oriented groups make choices and respond to the needs of their communities.
All Reflect sessions use short, though-provoking readings to coax discussion among participants. Those readings create constructive avenues for talking about subjects that might be challenging or divisive, or subjects that simply need a fresh approach.
For much more information, visit our website or contact Samantha Dwyer.
Recent Grants
“Fort Belknap Mid-Winter Fair,” Fort Belknap Mid-Winter Fair, Fort Belknap, $1,000. Support for the 2014 Annual Mid-Winter Fair February 3rd to 8th, 2014 at Fort Belknap Agency, which is dedicated to James Welch and features the film Winter in the Blood.
“Buddy Wakefield with Express TO Speak,” Express To Speak, Missoula, $500. Support for a writing clinic and live performance workshop led by national poetry slam winner Buddy Wakefield.
“Saving Seeds, Saving Food: Janisse Ray’s The Seed Underground,” Cultivate Helena, Inc., Helena, $500. Support for an educational series to increase bio-literacy through literature, film screenings, workshops and talks by ethobotanists, with a kickoff event featuring author Janisse Ray’s lecture on the value of heritage seeds, the tradition of seed-saving, and the importance of preserving seeds.
Thanks to Our Generous Supporters — January 2013
Organizations
Bitter Root Valley Historical Society
Lewis And Clark Trail Heritage Foundation—Crimson
Bluffs Chapter
Wibaux County Museum
Individuals
John Clayton
Kurt Ingold
Mark Matthews
Twylla McPherson**
Bruce Sievers** and Cynthia Perry
Carla Wambach
*Current Board and Staff Members
**Former Board and Staff Members
GRANT DEADLINES
The next deadline for regular grants (under $5000) is February 20th.
Visit the grants section of our website for full information about grant guidelines and deadlines.
EVENT CALENDAR
Visit our online calendar to find out about upcoming Humanities Montana-sponsored events.
MONTANA AT 150
February 1864:
On February 22, 1864, Frank Thompson left Bannack City for Washington D.C. His mission? To lobby for creation of a new territory. His primary appeal? Gold, and especially one spectacular sample: “It happened that a few days before starting, in retorting a lot of gold which had been gathered by quicksilver, over a blacksmith’s fire, that the crucible broke and the gold ran down the cinders, making them congealed, a most beautiful spangle of the value of $1,500.”
The spangle did its work: Montana Territory was created May 26, 1864.


Humanities Montana offers programs and grants for reflecting on the 150 year anniverary of Montana Territory. Please like Montana at 150 on Facebook and share history and information about this important anniverary.
TELL A FRIEND
Do you know someone who would like to receive eNews from Humanities Montana? Mail a link.
For more information…

Humanities Montana strives to enrich the lives of all Montanans by fostering inquiry and stimulating civil and informed conversations about the human experience.

Much more information on Humanities Montana and its many programs and services is available on our website.

Write us at:

Humanities Montana
311 Brantly
Missoula, MT, 59812-7848

or contact us via email, or call us at 406-243-6022, toll-free in Montana, 1-800-624-6001.

Humanities Montana News

Humanities Montana Festival of the Book 2013


The 14th Annual
Humanities Montana
Festival of the Book
October 10 – 12   •   Downtown Missoula
Join us for two days and three nights of (mostly) free events with over 80 authors!
This year’s featured events include:
A reading and conversation with Sherman Alexie
Oct 10  •  Wilma Theatre  •  FREE
A special edition of the popular storytelling event Tell Us Something
Oct 10  •  The Top Hat  •  FREE
The annual readers & writers reception
Oct 11  •  Missoula Art Museum  •  $25 per person (buy tickets)
The fifth annual Festival Poetry Slam, hosted by Tahj Kjelland, with a special appearance by international poetry slam winner Buddy Wakefield
Oct 11  •  The Top Hat  •  FREE
A special luncheon celebrating Dave Robicheaux’s return to Montana, with James Lee Burke
Oct 12  •  The Top Hat  •  $35 per person (buy tickets)
Book- and paper-making workshops for kids and adults
Oct 12  •  Missoula Art Museum
The annual Gala Reading with Montana Poet Laureate Tami Haaland, Richard Manning, Claire Vaye Watkins & Jamie Ford
Oct 12  •  Wilma Theatre  •  FREE
Plus readings of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and memoir throughout Friday and Saturday at the Holiday Inn:
Karen Joy Fowler
Christine Byle
Bill Dedman
Jo Deurbrouck
Pete Fromm
Andrew Sean Greer
Melissa Kwasny
Amy Leach
Kate Lebo
J. Robert Lennon
Elizabeth Lowell
Kat Martin
Gayle Morrison
Sheryl Noethe
Robert Pack
Robert Wrigley
Susanna Sonnenberg
Joshua Slotnick
Peter Rock
Doug Peacock
+ MANY MORE
FESTIVAL WEBSITE
Visit the festival website for complete author and presenter bios, panel and event descriptions, and more. (This site will be updated frequently over the next several weeks, so check back often.)
SPONSORS
Major 2013 festival sponsors include The National Endowment for the Humanities, The National Endowment for the Arts, Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Montana Arts Council, Dennis & Phyllis Washington Foundation, Missoula Art Museum, Missoula Public Library Foundation, The Missoulian and Montana Public Radio
SPEAKING OF BOOKS…
Humanities Montana will soon be updating the Montana Author’s Project, our online, interactive map showcasing some of the state’s best literature.
We invite you to vote for the titles you would most like to see added to the M.A.P. The five most popular selections will be announced at this year’s Festival of the Book
LEARN • REFLECT • TOGETHER
Humanities Montana Festival of the Book 2013