EVERYBODY CAN VOTE FOR THE YEAR OF THE WOMAN AT MHS


               Contact: Tom Cook 406-444-1645  Release: Receipt
EVERYBODY CAN VOTE FOR THE YEAR OF THE WOMAN AT MHS
               The Montana Historical Society is campaigning to make 2014 the Year of Women in History as it celebrates the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Montana.
               On Nov. 3, 1914, Montana voters approved an amendment to the state constitution allowing women to vote in all local, state and national elections. Passage of the amendment in Montana came six years before women gained the right to vote nationwide.
               MHS Historical Specialist Martha Kohl said the centennial of women’s suffrage in Montana is worth celebrating, and she hopes the anniversary sparks a wider recognition of women’s roles in history.
               “We have launched a Women’s History Matters project that will be active all year long to celebrate the centennial by looking inclusively at women’s history in Montana,” Kohl said.
               The contributions of women to Montana history have long been overlooked, she said.
                “I’ve given talks to people who study and who care about Montana history,” Kohl said. “I ask them to name five women from Montana history in the 19th century and five Montana women from the 20th century, and most can’t.”
               At the heart of the Women’s History Matters project is a dedicated website, MontanaWomensHistory.org. Over the course of 2014 the front page will highlight Montana women’s topics, organizations, and individuals, including homesteaders, mothers, doctors, politicians, warriors, and community builders. The articles will present people like banker Elouise Cobell, community activist Lula Martinez, rodeo star Fanny Sperry Steele, and nurse Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail.
When the statewide advisory committee met to choose the article topics, members wanted them to reflect the diversity of Montanans’ experiences. Thus, the features cover over 200 years of history to tell the stories of famous and little-known women from Butte to Browning and Missoula to Miles City.
Two new stories will be added each week and readers are encouraged to subscribe to the site’s free RSS feed to make sure they see the articles as they are added.
               MontanaWomensHistory.org also has resources for people and organizations interested in organizing events in their own communities to recognize the centennial and learn more about the history of women in Montana.
               “We are encouraging every community to do something in 2014 focusing on women’s history,” Kohl said. “We have a whole list of things people can do to celebrate the year.”
The goal of the project is to tell a more inclusive story about Montana’s past, Kohl said.
               “Women have not been at the center of power, so when we tell history from the perspective of people in power, we often leave women out,” she said. “It’s time to change that.”
               According to Kohl, the statewide Indian Education for All initiative provided inspiration for the Women’s History Matters project. Indian Education for All has promoted the telling of an inclusive Montana history that encompasses both Indian and non-Indian stories and perspectives. Women’s History Matters is intended to start that process for women’s history, Kohl said.
 Ironically, Indian women were not included in the 1914 suffrage victory. Native American men and women did not get to vote until 1924. Nevertheless, Indian women are well represented in the stories being told on the MontanaWomensHistory.orgwebsite.
               In fact, the website has something for almost everyone: links to over 130 women’s history articles published in MHS’s Montana The Magazine of Western History, information about historic places associated with Montana women, early Montana newspaper editorials advocating or opposing suffrage, intriguing photographs, links to online exhibits, curriculum material for teachers, a list of speakers available to give talks, and a wealth of bibliographies and research sources.
               There are even more stories about women in the MHS archives and library, and the MHS Research Center stands ready to assist individuals or organizations in learning how to find them and bring these important Montana stories to the public.
               Funding for the website and other aspects of the Women’s History Matters project was provided in part by Montana’s Cultural Trust.
 
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EVERYBODY CAN VOTE FOR THE YEAR OF THE WOMAN AT MHS

Call For Cultural and Aesthetics Project Advisory Committee


Call For Cultural and Aesthetics Project Advisory Committee
Applications for membership on the Cultural and Aesthetic Project Advisory Committee will be accepted through May 1, 2014.  The Montana Arts Council makes half of the appointments to this committee, and the Montana Historical Society makes the other half.  The arts council looks for a broad range of professional arts expertise, and also geographic, racial and gender balance for the committee.  Obligations of the four-year terms include attending a 2-day panel meeting every other year and reviewing up to 100 grant applications online in preparation for that.  The next meeting is scheduled for October 13-14, 2014 in Helena.  If you are interested in being considered, please send a letter of interest and a resume or bio electronically to Kristin Han Burgoyne at kburgoyne@mt.govby May 1, 2014. 
Call For Cultural and Aesthetics Project Advisory Committee

Call for Cultural Trust Committee Nominations

CALL FOR CULTURAL AND AESTHETIC PROJECT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Applications for membership on the Cultural and Aesthetic Project Advisory Committee will be accepted through May 1, 2012.  The Montana Arts Council makes half of the appointments to this committee, and the Montana Historical Society makes the other half.  The arts council looks for a broad range of professional arts expertise, and also geographic, racial and gender balance for the committee.  Obligations of the four-year terms include attending a 2-day panel meeting every other year and reviewing up to 100 grant applications online in preparation for that.  The next meeting is scheduled for October 8-9, 2012 in Helena.  If you are interested in being considered, please send a letter of interest and a resume or bio electronically to Kristin Han Burgoyne at kburgoyne@mt.gov by May 1, 2012.  Individuals who expressed interest two years ago and did not receive a committee appointment should send an email to Kristin expressing their interest, as well as an updated resume or bio.
Call for Cultural Trust Committee Nominations

Cultural Trust Applications

T-minus one week and counting to the July 30, 5:00pm Mountain Time deadline for our Cultural Trust Grants.

For those of you interested in trying to squeak out an application in the next seven days.  The application is located here.

For those of you “in the business” and interested in our online applications…. call me…. I’ll give you the nickel tour and give you an access code so you can see what I see.  Call me geeky but it really is fascinating. 

Some general (unedited) rambling thoughts about this process to date…..

So far it has been a lot of work.  Designing, re-designing, streamlining, re-thinking.  I believe there are two key points to creating a really good process…. staff buy-in and streamlined systems.  And, of course, patience.  I don’t believe the online process will necessarily save us work load because it is exchanging one set of challenges with another but I do believe what we produce will be more consistent, accurate and reliable.  Ask me if I still believe this a year from now.

A few things I’ve questioned during this online application process.

1.  What about all the little things I’m missing in developing the application?  MST?  Is it MST or MDT?  Standard or Daylight?  All I know is… when my desktop calendar says 5:00 (or when my cell phone says 17:00…) next Friday I am shutting down the application.  I can do that.  I have the power.  Also a bit confusing… while the company we work with is located in Bozeman, Montana, their server is in Iowa somewhere… so some things have a central time zone time stamp.  This has messed me up more than once.  LESSON LEARNED:  It is the little tiny things I didn’t realize I had to think about that may be my downfall.  Slow down.  Take a break and let your mind perk on the problem for a while and you will probably realize the solution. 

2.  What if everyone doesn’t have the software or software knowledge I have?  For example… Foundant contracts to use a service called fax-to-file.  You click the link, some directions and a fax number pop up, you fax the documents and they magically are turned into pdf forms.  Sweet, right?  You need a hard-copy signature for the application page to show the sponsor is aware of the project?  Use fax-to-file.  You want to upload your 501 c 3 letter from 1973 and don’t have a scanner?  Use fax-to-file.  So here’s a special story I’ve been sharing with our grantees who are feeling technologically-deficient.  I decided I better actually USE fax-to-file instead of just touting the ease of it.  So I did.  And it worked.  Magically.  Until I opened the pdf file and it was BLANK.  BLANK.  I was sputtering.  Stupid technology.  And then I had a moment of clarity and realization.  I put the documents on the fax machine back-to-front.  I faxed the backside of my documents to my pdf.  I admit it.  Not upside-down but bass-ackwards.  There goes my technology merit badge for 2010.  LESSON LEARNED:  Be patient.  If I can screw it up, so can you.  So don’t feel bad when you call me with what you think is question that demonstrates your technological lackings.  (But PS… call me soon… if you call me at 4:45 next Friday I promise I won’t be as patient with you as I will today.)

3.  What if someone gives up because they are terrified of the technology?  Call me.  Really.  I’m right here.  (Ok, yes, I was out on Monday and Tuesday but that couldn’t be avoided…. Officially we are calling it a “family emergency” but the reality is my mom was fighting a CRP fire and hit a badger hole with the 4-wheeler.  She had a very acrobatic landing and ended up spending a night in the hospital.  All is well…. and I’m very thankful for my flexible co-workers who covered for me while I was gone.)  I’ve talked to several applicants who are not pleased with the concept of online applications but I think this is the direction things are going and our agency staff is here to help.  LESSON LEARNED:  We’ve tried to make this application process as simple as possible but without you trying it out and telling us what works and what doesn’t work we won’t be able to make it better.  That’s my nice way of saying, “You are beta-test guinea pigs for my evil plot to take over the world.”  Kidding.

The serious lesson in all of this is the learning process.  This online application is a learning process for all of us and we, as a staff, are open to hearing your thoughts, constructive criticisms and ideas for improvement. 

Cultural Trust Applications

Cultural Trust Committee Nominations

We are in the process of seeking high-quality nominees for the Cultural Trust (C&A) grant committee, and I’m wondering if you’d like to be considered as a nominee – or perhaps someone on your staff or board would be just perfect, too.
What does being a C&A committee member entail? Frankly, it’s a lot of work, but it is immensely rewarding! There are usually 110-120 apps, which usually takes about 20-40 hours to review. C&A Committee members are paid $50/day for the time it takes to review them on their own and for the two days of committee meetings.
Apps come to the panelists a month prior to the committee meeting. The committee is meeting this fall on Monday-Tuesday, October 11-12 in Helena. We pay travel/hotel/meals at state rates. Committee terms are for four years, which encompass two grant cycles. It’s a great way to find out what else is going on in the state, and committee members are very inspired by what is happening through Montana!!
The arts council members make the final selection of committee members, which they’ll do in June, so this query is to ask you whether you’d like to be a part of the nominating pool. If you are interested, could you send Stefanie Flynn in our office a resume or bio and a short note stating you are interested, by the end of the month?

Cultural Trust Committee Nominations

African-Americans in Montana Heritage

“I love it when a plan comes together….” Quick… name that movie.

Patty (the Curator of History at the Montana Historical Society) just forwarded me the link they’ve developed African-Americans in Montana Heritage.

This project was funded with Cultural Trust money and I just love seeing a project go from idea to reality.

The bibliography page’s images are still under construction but things look great so far!

African-Americans in Montana Heritage

REDLI AND RATLEDGE TAPPED TO LEAD STATE’S CULTURAL AND AESTHETICS PROJECT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

REDLI AND RATLEDGE TAPPED TO LEAD STATE’S CULTURAL AND AESTHETICS PROJECT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Helena, Montana – Penny Redli of Columbus and Mark Ratledge of Missoula were elected as Advisory Committee chairman and vice-chairman, respectively, of the state of Montana’s Cultural and Aesthetics Project Grants program.

The Cultural and Aesthetics Trust is a fund established from Coal Tax revenues by the legislature in 1975 to restore murals in the State Capitol and support other cultural and aesthetic projects. The Cultural and Aesthetics Project Grants program is steered by a 16-member committee of advisors, half appointed by the Montana Arts Council and half by the Montana Historical Society. The Montana Arts Council administers the program for the legislature. The advisory committee makes funding recommendations to the legislature, who make all final grant funding decisions.

Penny Redli is the executive director of the Museum of the Beartooths in Columbus, and served as executive director of the Carbon County Historical Society and Museum in Red Lodge for nearly nine years. She is the secretary/treasurer of the Museums Association of Montana and was the chair of their annual conference committee for five years. This is her second term as one of the Montana Historical Society’s appointees to the advisory committee.

Mark Ratledge, who writes a technology column for both State of the Arts and the Missoulian, received a Montana Arts Council Individual Artist’s Fellowship in Photography in 1991. He has also acted as an advisor for grant programs of the Montana Arts Council. He is an information technology consultant, and teaches English and computer science at The University of Montana.

REDLI AND RATLEDGE TAPPED TO LEAD STATE’S CULTURAL AND AESTHETICS PROJECT ADVISORY COMMITTEE