Arts Educators June 12 2013


Dear Arts Educators,
As you know, Beck McLaughlin retired from the Montana Arts Council on May 31.  We’re going to miss her so much!  Until we get someone new in the saddle here, I’ll be the arts ed enewsletter editor. 
We are in the midst of a search to replace Beck.  A full description of the Arts Education Director job requirements and application process can be found at https://svc.mt.gov/statejobsearch/listingdetails.aspx?id=10462.
Below you will find information on:
·        MAC’s Arts Education Director position info
·        “Schools Adding Time to Teach the Arts,” National Center on Time and Learning
·        Teaching Artist Handbook: “Tools, Techniques and Ideas to Help Any Artist Teach”
·        Botlahle – SA (South Africa’s) Got Talent 2012 – a “must see” video on the power of poetry from the lips of a young girl
·        Announcing Arts Education Partnership’s new research bulletin:  The Essential Skills the Arts Teach
·        Free Artsourcecurriculum online resources from the Los Angeles Music Center

·        Why Philanthropy Should Steam Ahead and Support the Creative Economy (STEM to STEAM)

·        Arts Education Funders Coalition Update:  June 25 Web Conference
·        Support for Education, Environment, and Economic Development in Montana
PPL Montana Community Fund
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
All the best,
Arni Fishbaugh, Executive Director
Montana Arts Council, PO Box 202201, Helena, MT  59620-2201
afishbaugh@mt.gov; 406-444-6546
Montana Arts Council seeks new Director of Arts Education
·        The Director of Arts Education is responsible for overseeing the direction of MAC’s arts education efforts.  The position reports to the Executive Director, and supervises contract staff.
·        This program is considered to be one of the finest arts education programs of all the state arts agencies in the country.
·        The position has an opportunity for regional and national exposure, as well as the pleasure of working with great arts educators, artists and education leaders throughout the state. 
·        The position may have flexible work hours (which need to be coordinated with the executive director).  The position attends two national or regional professional development/peer meetings per year. Travel throughout Montana is required.  
·        A full description of the job requirements and application process can be found at https://svc.mt.gov/statejobsearch/listingdetails.aspx?id=10462.
·        The position is full time and must reside in Helena. The salary range is $49,000 to $53,000.  The application process closes Monday, July 8.
Thank you for passing this information on to potential candidates!

 

Schools Adding Time to Teach the Arts

Nora Fleming
The arts—said to be neglected by schools since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 pressured them to focus on literacy and mathematics instruction—may no longer be side-swiped for other disciplines.
Some expanded learning time schools are now using their longer school days not just for additional instruction in math, reading, and the like, but for arts education (dance, drawing, theater, and music), according to a new report released by the Boston-based National Center on Time & Learning called “Advancing Arts Through an Expanded School Day.”  ….”The two arenas of academics (ELA and math) and the arts are often positioned as competitors in a kind of zero-sum game, rather than as partners in a potential educational synergy that holds both intrinsic and instrumental benefits for students,” the report says. “Arts education, when it is approached with the seriousness of purpose exemplified by the schools profiled in this report, can be a powerful medium through which students come to love learning, strive for excellence, and imagine a fulfilling, purposeful life.”
New Teaching Artist’s Handbook
The Teaching Artist Handbook: Tools, Techniques and Ideas to Help any Artist Teach, published by Columbia College Chicago Press and distributed by the University of Chicago Press is the first book of its kind:
·        The book is written by and for teaching artists and arts educators.
·        The book can be used as a complete guide to developing one’s own teaching practice, and also as a reference or professional development text that covers  wide range of questions and issues of teaching artist work.
·        The book is based on the premise that the great strength of teaching artists as educators is their ability to teach as artists and relate to students of all kinds as artists.
·        The book provides all the tools and techniques necessary for any artist in any discipline to develop a teaching practice based on her/his specific expertise and interests, and to find ways of implementing such teaching in a wide variety of educational, institutional and community settings.
                Order books for $19.95 at http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/T/bo15630740.html
Botlahle:  Winner of South Africa’s Talent 2012
Experience a young African girl who brings the world to life in a remarkably touching way through the performance of her poetry…with thanks to Diana Green, Arts and Education Manager from the Alabama Arts Council, for sharing this.  Diana says, “This is a strong example of why I believe the most important thing we can do, for our students and for ourselves, is listen to the voices of our students. Not through the voices of others, but through the voices of their own creations.”
Arts Education Partnership’s Preparing Students for the Next America: The Benefits of an Arts Education
AEP’s latest research bulletin, Preparing Students for the Next America: The Benefits of an Arts Education, offers a snapshot of how the arts support achievement in school, bolster skills demanded of a 21st century workforce, and enrich the lives of young people and communities. It draws on the research in AEP’s ArtsEdSearch.org, the nation’s first clearinghouse of research on the impact of arts education on students and their school communities.  Order hard copies online at http://www.aep-arts.org/publications-store/#id=1&cid=720&wid=401or download the PDF for free.  Tweet about it using the hashtag #ArtsFosterSuccess.
Free Online Resources from the Los Angeles Music Center:  Artsource

The Los Angeles Music Center has recently published its acclaimed Artsource curriculum resources online. Artsourceis a resource that empowers teachers to present artistic models in dance, theatre, and music to their students; integrate the arts with other subject areas; and explore a broad spectrum of multicultural art forms in their classrooms. Each curriculum unit focuses on a specific artist and work in the performing arts with extensive lesson plans for different levels of student readiness, and each is built on the California Visual and Performing Arts Framework and Arts Standards.  You can see all the available resources here: http://www.musiccenter.org/education/Teacher-Resources/Artsource-Curriculum/.

Why Philanthropy Should Steam Ahead and Support the Creative Economy

Claudia Jacobs — Associate Director, Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University — writes for Huffington Post:
If we are to actively enrich our communities, arts should not be a stepchild of science, technology, engineering or math (STEM). In New England alone, over 53,000 people are employed in the “creative economy” and that sector, if it were considered in the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS), which it is not, would rank just below the data and information sector and just ahead of the truck transportation sector, according to 2009 statistics compiled by the New England Foundation for the Arts. The 18,026 New England arts organizations supply the economy with nearly $3.7 billion — so why does STEM, an acronym that excludes the arts, seem to be on the tip of everyone’s tongue? Yes, there are major reasons why the U.S. needs to be focused on producing adults with skills in these areas, but why not include the arts and go from STEM to STEAM?
June 25 Web Conference: Arts Education Funders Coalition Update
Join Grantmakers in the Arts President & CEO Janet Brown and Penn Hill Group Executive Vice President Alex Nock for an update on Arts Education Funders Coalition (AEFC) federal advocacy efforts in 2013. The 50-minute Web Conferences is free to members and open to everyone. The non-member rate is $35.
More information and registration here.
Support for Education, Environment, and Economic Development in Montana
PPL Montana Community Fund
The PPL Montana Community Fund provides support to nonprofit organizations, schools and school districts, and colleges and universities throughout Montana. The company’s community grants are made in three program areas: The Education category focuses on arts and science instruction in schools, as well as programming for before and after school programs. The Environment category supports projects designed to improve the environment or promote public health. The Economic Development category funds programs that enhance Montana communities to make them appealing for business relocation or expansion. The upcoming application deadline is July 31, 2013. Visit the company’s website to submit an online application.   http://www.pplmontana.com/community/our+community/community+fund/
Arlynn (Arni) Fishbaugh, Executive Director
Montana Arts Council
PO Box 202201, Helena MT  59620-2201
Street Address:  830 N. Warren
406-444-6546 afishbaugh@mt.gov

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Arts Educators June 12 2013