AGING IN MONTANA

AGING IN MONTANA
from North Central Montana RSVP Newsletter “Volunteer Power”
Montana is aging at a faster rate than most of the other States in the Union.
The 2005 census projections indicated that by 2030, Montana is expected to rank 5th in the Nation in the percentage of people over the age of 65 at 25.8%.
The first of the Baby Boomer Generation turns 65 years of age in 2011 and for the next 20 years, the 65 and older generation will increase in record numbers.
Starting in January 2011, every 7.5 seconds, a Baby Boomer will turn 65. In Montana, this equates to 25 people every day turn 65 or more than 9,100 each year.
The 85 and older age group has been identified as the fastest growing segment of our society which means we are an aging society and that people are living longer.
Montana’s 65 and older population is 14.68% of our States total population and growing.
By 2015, Montana’s 65 and older population will have increased by 22.6% and by 2020 it will have increased by 52.7%
In 2000, Montana had 160 people over age 100. By 2030, this age group may be over 3,000.
Many Rural/Frontier communities in Montana are already at or above the 2030 projection of 25.8% of their populations being over the age of 65 and several of our counties are rapidly nearing this figure.
AGING IN MONTANA

AGING IN MONTANA

AGING IN MONTANA
from North Central Montana RSVP Newsletter “Volunteer Power”
Montana is aging at a faster rate than most of the other States in the Union.
The 2005 census projections indicated that by 2030, Montana is expected to rank 5th in the Nation in the percentage of people over the age of 65 at 25.8%.
The first of the Baby Boomer Generation turns 65 years of age in 2011 and for the next 20 years, the 65 and older generation will increase in record numbers.
Starting in January 2011, every 7.5 seconds, a Baby Boomer will turn 65. In Montana, this equates to 25 people every day turn 65 or more than 9,100 each year.
The 85 and older age group has been identified as the fastest growing segment of our society which means we are an aging society and that people are living longer.
Montana’s 65 and older population is 14.68% of our States total population and growing.
By 2015, Montana’s 65 and older population will have increased by 22.6% and by 2020 it will have increased by 52.7%
In 2000, Montana had 160 people over age 100. By 2030, this age group may be over 3,000.
Many Rural/Frontier communities in Montana are already at or above the 2030 projection of 25.8% of their populations being over the age of 65 and several of our counties are rapidly nearing this figure.
AGING IN MONTANA

Montana Healthcare Providers

Please participate in the Montana Arts Council
Arts in Healthcare Research Survey

Help us to gather important information from those who work in medical professions, and other related fields such as: art therapy, services to senior citizens and patient recovery groups, hospice organizations and sheltered workshops. We are interested in hearing from anyone working with special populations in Montana.
Respond to this important research today!

Direct Care Providers use this link:
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MD3PTQJ

Healthcare Administrators use this link:
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NNLSFXP

Please share this request with your colleagues.
To learn more about this survey and why your state arts council is gathering information from medical and art professionals, please visit our website at:
http://art.mt.gov/

Research SURVEY OPEN until August 31, 2011

Montana Healthcare Providers

MAC LAUNCHES THEIR ARTS IN MONTANA HEALTHCARE SURVEY

Around the world, the arts are finding their way into healthcare settings in ever more diverse ways.

Patients, their families, staff, direct care providers, administrators and those protecting the financial bottom-line, are discovering that there are a variety of real benefits to this. The Montana Arts Council has embarked on an online survey project to inventory the state of the arts and healthcare in Montana to determine where our technical and financial assistance might best be directed. We will survey artists, arts organizations, medical direct-care providers and administrators of healthcare settings separately.

As an Artist, Direct Care Provider, Administrator of a Montana healthcare facility, or Arts Organization, we will be inviting you to participate in this research. Your inside help is key to establishing an accurate picture of our state and we would appreciate your assistance and expertise. The first two online surveys, for Artists and Arts Organizations, are now open for responses. The remaining Direct Care Provider and Healthcare Administrator surveys will follow soon. The online survey will take approximately 10-12 minutes and all responses will be anonymous.

TO PARTICIPATE, please go to:
http://art.mt.gov/
Choose either the ARTIST SURVEY, or the ARTS ORGANIZATION SURVEY

Questions or Comments, Please contact:
Kim Baraby Hurtle
Executive Assistant & Percent-for-Art Manager
khurtle@mt.gov
406-444-6639

MAC LAUNCHES THEIR ARTS IN MONTANA HEALTHCARE SURVEY

Zap The Gap – Part 3 "Go ahead and fire me … I wanted to go to a party tonight anyway!" Dealing with the New Millennial Generation by Larry Johnson,

The article below is pretty interesting. Anyone have any thoughts??

Zap The Gap – Part 3 “Go ahead and fire me … I wanted to go to a party tonight anyway!” Dealing with the New Millennial Generation by Larry Johnson, CSP & Meagan Johnson, CSP

This article is from:

Larry Johnson Tel: 800-836-6599 E-mail: Larry@Larry-Johnson.com
Website: http://larry-johnson.com/index.shtml

Also, if you’d like to read and/or distribute previous articles from “Tips For Today’s Managers,” you can find them on my website, http://larry-johnson.com/index.shtml . Just click on “Free Articles.”

Enjoy,

Larry Johnson, CSP, Speaker & Author

http://www.larry-johnson.com/products.htm

***********************************************************

Article:

Zap The Gap – Part 3 “Go ahead and fire me … I wanted to go to a party tonight anyway!” Dealing with the New Millennial Generation

By Larry Johnson, CSP and Meagan Johnson, CSP

In the last two issues of this e-zine, we’ve discussed some of the challenges managers face dealing with different generations in the workplace. In the first article, Zap the Gap, Part 1, we covered the concept of signposts that drive generational behavior and we described how to work with more effectively with the Traditional Generation who came of age during the Great Depression. In Zap The Gap, Part 2 we addressed dealing with the Baby Boomer Generation (born between 1946 and 1964) and Generation X (born between 1965 and 1980.) If you missed these articles, and would like to read them, go to http://larry-johnson.com/free-articles.shtml and click on the two Zap the Gap articles listed there.

Now we’re going to discuss the group you’ve all been waiting for:
the New Millennial Generation (born after 1980.)

With 72 million members, New Millennials are the second largest generation cohort in the workplace today. Many were raised by Baby Boomer parents who either postponed starting families until their mid-thirties so they could pursue career goals – or they started second families after the dissolution of earlier marriages. So the parents of this generation were older (mid thirties and early forties) and more financially secure than the parents of previous generations. Additionally, many had gone to great medical and financial lengths to have these children so late in life.

When it came to parenting, these aging Baby Boomers were determined to “get it right.” So like helicopters, they hovered over their children’s every move. They arranged play dates with friends, scheduled extra curricular activities like soccer and ballet lessons, helped their children with their homework (often doing it for them,) and made sure they wanted for nothing. Where the parents of Generation X often left their children to fend for themselves while they pursued their own careers, the parents of the New Millennial Generation were, and still are, heavily involved in their children’s lives.

And the involvement doesn’t stop with graduation from high school or college. Job recruiters tell us that it’s not uncommon for New Millennial prospects to delay accepting job offers until they clear it with mom and dad. We know of employers who have been asked by potential hires to allow their parents to sit in on job interviews. And one manager told us that he received a call from the father of one of his young employees complaining about the unfairness of his daughter’s performance review.

The upside to all this parental nurturing is that these kids are often better educated and better grounded than previous generations. Having lived a childhood where their value was continually celebrated, self-esteem is not a problem for these folks – they tend to have lots of it. The downside is that this Generation expects their managers to have an almost parental interest in them. They want those in authority to care about them the way their parents did. They expect to be applauded and praised when they do well, just like their moms and dads did when they scored a hockey goal or danced in a recital. They expect their co-workers and managers to tell them where to be, when to be there, and what to do when they get there, just like mom and dad did. And when they stumble, they expect someone to kiss the owe-y and tell them everything will be alright, just like mom and dad did.

So What?

If you work with this generation, offer guidance and suggestions to help them with the ins and outs of the job that weren’t covered in New Employee Orientation. If you manage them, provide a thorough orientation to the job that breaks down their duties and your expectations into bite-sized chunks. Go out of your way to give them regular feedback, both reinforcing and correcting – and give it often. This means cheering them when they do well and gently but firmly correcting them when they stray (just like mom and dad did.) Ask them often how they are doing and be willing to listen. Don’t be afraid to correct them, even for behaviors you would assume they should know better than to do – they don’t. For example, one operator of an amusement park we know, whose employees are all New Millennials, had to put an admonition in the employee handbook against spitting in the park in front of customers.

The bottom line is that this generation needs a bit of coddling.
That doesn’t mean you don’t hold them accountable for results and adult behavior. It does mean, however, that you may have to bring them along, coaching them, encouraging them, pushing them and occasionally scolding them – just like mom and dad did.

That may sound like a lot of work, just like parenthood. But like parenthood, it usually produces good results.

************************************************************

Larry Johnson, Author & Certified Professional Speaker Tel:
800-836-6599 Web: http://www.larry-johnson.com E-mail:
larry@larry-johnson.com

Meagan Johnson, Author & Certified Professional Speaker Tel:
800-836-6599 Web: http://www.MeaganJohnson.com E-mail:
Meagan@MeaganJohnson.com Web: http://www.larry-johnson.com
E-mail: larry@larry-johnson.com

Johnson Training Group

24626 N. 84th St.
Scottsdale, AZ 85255

Zap The Gap – Part 3 "Go ahead and fire me … I wanted to go to a party tonight anyway!" Dealing with the New Millennial Generation by Larry Johnson,

Aging on the Today Show

Statistics say Montana will have one of the oldest populations in the United States in a few years. (Yup, blame it on the baby boomers.)

Some of you may have heard me talk about accessibility issues. Most grantees know they should be doing more about accessibility and really want to be successful with it but they are over-worked, under-staffed, and overwhelmed.

It’s ok. I understand. Me too.

But.

I really want everyone to think about accessibility every time they do anything within their organization. (I know…. small goal, right?)

You know what I’m discovering? As the staff of organizations age it gets easier and easier for me to “sell” my message….. my own staff included.

So I thought a demonstration was in order. I was sent a link to “The Today Show” demonstrating what it might be like to age. I love these kinds of hands-on things.

So check it out and let me know what you think.

Next time I’ll tell you a story (only slightly embellished) about my grandma to demonstrate the importance of anticipating the needs of your aging constituency.

Aging on the Today Show