Artists August 22, 2012


Dear Artists,
        Below you will find items of general interest and opportunities for Visual Artists, Performing Artists, and Writers .
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards, Kim
·        16th Annual Harvest Moon Ball Art Auction and Fashion Show
·        26th Annual Materials: Hard & Soft National Contemporary Craft Competition and Exhibition
·        Call to Artists: 5th Avenue North – Civil Rights RFQ
·        “The Profitable Artist” E-Course
·        THEATRE COMMUNICATIONS GROUP– TCG’s International Grant Program
·        The Best Books for Writers
General Interest
FOOD FOR THOUGHT:  Innovation and Change in the Marketplace
How Paperbacks Changed the World
Nathan Bransford blog
August 20th, 2012
         Almost a century ago there was a new, disruptive technology that demolished the established order of selling books and drastically lowered prices: paperbacks. Andrew Shaffer writes:
Here’s a little perspective: In 1939, gas cost 10 cents a gallon at the pump. A movie ticket set you back 20 cents. John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, the year’s bestselling hardcover book, was $2.75. For a nation suffering 20 percent unemployment, books were an impossible expense. 
But in just one day, Robert de Graff changed that. On June 19, 1939, the tall, dynamic entrepreneur took out a bold, full-page ad in The New York Times: OUT TODAY—THE NEW POCKET BOOKS THAT MAY TRANSFORM NEW YORK’S READING HABITS… 
If paperbacks were going to succeed in America, they would need a new model. De Graff, for his part, was well acquainted with the economics of books. He knew that printing costs were high because volumes were low—an average hardcover print run of 10,000 might cost 40 cents per copy. With only 500 bookstores in the U.S., most located in major cities, low demand was baked into the equation.
          Sound familiar?
to read more >>
Survey on Artist’s Residencies
Dear colleagues –
       The Alliance of Artists Communities and Res Artis invite you to participate in a brief survey on the values of artist residencies, and we hope you will take the time to contribute your input.
At a recent meeting at The Bellagio Center, the two organizations convened a group of leaders in a preliminary discussion to explore the priorities and impact of the field of residencies. In furthering this    work, we hope to jointly develop a statement of shared values for the field, in order to guide our work and provide a framework by which the field can assess its impact.
      We also ask that you share this survey link with others who are engaged with the field of residencies, as managers, funders, participants, advisors, or other stakeholders, so that we may include a rich and diverse set of perspectives to inform this work.
      We ask that you complete the survey by the 15th of September so that we may share the results at the upcoming meetings of Res Artis in Tokyo, Japan, and the Alliance of Artists Communities in Kansas City, Missouri.
Alix Refshauge
Research + Special Projects Associate
Alliance of Artists Communities
Alliance of Artists Communities
255 South Main Street
Providence, RI 02903
US
Deadline: September 15, 2012
State of the Arts
Montana artists can receive a free subscription to the Montana Arts Council’s State of the Arts newspaper by simply click through the following link;
http://art.mt.gov/resources/resources_soasubscribe.asp.  Online and out-of-state hard-copies are also available.
KBH
Kim Baraby Hurtle
Percent-for-Art Director
Montana Arts Council
830 N Warren St, First Floor
PO Box 202201
Helena, MT 59620-2201
406-444-6639
Montana . . .The Land of Creativity
VISUAL ARTISTS
16th Annual
Harvest Moon Ball
Art Auction and Fashion Show
Theme: “Yellow Bird Moon, in Honor of Yellow Bird Woman”
Dear Artist:
You are cordially invited to participate in the 16th Annual Harvest Moon Ball Art Auction and Fashion Show
to be held Saturday, September 22, 2012.
Please visit our website: www.harvestmoonballblkft.com  
The Blackfeet Community Foundation (BCF),
DATES TO REMEMBER:
_____ August 29th…Artwork Submitted
_____ September 22th…5:00 PM Reception and
          Auction Begins!
_____ Booth Set Time 3:00-4:00
_____ Booth Open 4:00-6:00
See Attachment: Consignment Display Criteria.pdf & Items needed –checklist.pdf & HMB letter.pdf
26th Annual Materials: Hard & Soft National Contemporary Craft
Competition and Exhibition
Greater Denton Arts Council, Denton, TX
February 8 – April 5, 2013
Entry fee: There is a $30 non-refundable fee, for up to three (3) entries
Download the prospectus from our website:
Awards:GDAC will provide $5,000 in awards. Winners will be determined by the juror, on site, after the accepted works
are received at the Center for the Visual Arts.
Eligible Media:Works produced in any of the craft media: clay, fiber, glass, metal, paper, wood, or any combination of craft
media, are acceptable. Entries must be the complete work of the submitting artist. Kits or commercially designed
works will not be accepted. All work must have been completed within the past two years (2010-2012)
and not previously exhibited in the Center for the Visual Arts. Artists must reside in the United States or its possessions.
Deadline: September 7, 2012 (not a postmark deadline)
Call to Artists: 5th Avenue North – Civil Rights RFQ
The Metro Nashville Arts Commission (Metro Arts) is soliciting artists to design, fabricate and install artwork(s) inspired by the Civil Rights Movement in Nashville on 5th Avenue/Avenue of the Arts before October 2013.  The project budget allocates $75,000 for one artwork or multiple, related artworks.  The public art project is open to professional artists and artist teams.
•      CALL TO ARTISTS (link to RFQ)
•      SITE PLAN 1
•      SITE PLAN 2
All submittals must be received no later than **** Friday September 7, 2012, 12 a.m. Mountain Standard Time **** (1 a.m. Central Standard Time) through Call For Entry/  www.callforentry.org
follow on Twitter | friend on Facebook | forward to a friend 
Requests for accommodation please contact:
Leigh Patton, Metro Arts’ ADA Compliance Coordinator
800 2nd Avenue South, P.O. Box 196300
Nashville, TN 37219-6300
(615) 862-6720 / TTY Relay Service 800-848-0298
See Attachments: Civil-rights-RFQ & Site Plan 2.  Site Plan 1 is too large for this e-newsletter and will need to be requested from the MNACommission. 
Deadline: Submission deadline: Materials must be submitted via callforentry.org not later than:
**** 12 a.m., Friday September 7, 2012, Mountain Standard Time ****
(1 a.m. Central Standard Time)
“The Profitable Artist” E-Course
NEW YORK FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND RUTGERS UNIVERSITY’S MASON GROSS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS LAUNCH NEW ONLINE COURSE TO HELP ARTISTS LEARN TO MANAGE THEIR CAREERS AS ENTREPRENEURS
Course Is Based on NYFA’s Book The Profitable Artist
NEW YORK and NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ – Are you an artist who, having mastered your craft, now finds that your career has hit a wall? Do you have a specific project or goal that you want to accomplish but lack the resources?
Artists from all disciplines facing these challenges will learn everything they need to know about how to plan and organize their careers through the new online course entitled “The Profitable Artist.”
The course, from Rutgers University’s Mason Gross School of the Arts, is based on the book The Profitable Artist, which was published last year by Artspire, an online community that supports artists and is a program of the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA). The new course is taught by NYFA’s team of professionals and focuses on the essential topics related to entrepreneurship in the arts, and debuts in October of 2012. Expert presenters will lead students through important subjects like:
* Strategic Planning in the Arts
* Financial Management and Budgeting
* Legal Issues for Artists
* Marketing in the Arts
* Fundraising for Artists
By the end of this course, artists will have built an action plan for their career or project, and will have developed the skills needed to execute it.
“NYFA has initiated a number of programs to help artists learn how to be business people and entrepreneurs, so that they can concentrate on what is most important – their work,” said Michael Royce of NYFA. “This new course is another avenue designed to help artists, regardless of background, career level and art from, achieve this critical goal.”
Space is limited, so for registration and more information, please visit:
For questions about the curriculum or course specifics, please email pcobb@nyfa.org
PERFORMING ARTS
Now Available: Applications and Guidelines for
THEATRE COMMUNICATIONS GROUP
TCG’s International Grant Program
GLOBAL CONNECTIONS
ROUND 2 • CYCLE A
Global Connections encourages reciprocity and cultural exchange throughout the world by supporting the unrestricted travel and projects of professionals working in all aspects of theatre.
Recipients may use the funds to pursue theatre-based activities abroad or to host international colleagues within the U.S.
The grants are offered through two separate initiatives:
·          ON the ROAD travel grants will award six grants of up to $5,000 each, per cycle, to foster new relationships with international colleagues that will inspire each other’s work and aesthetics by creating opportunities for cultural exchange. This initiative is open to a broad range of theatre professionals from artists to administrators to those in production areas.
·          IN the LAB project development grants will award three grants of $10,000 each, per cycle, to further preexisting international collaborations by supporting residencies that either advance the research and development of a theatre piece or explore elements leading up to a full production. Projects do not need to result in a final mainstage production.
·          ON the ROAD grants are not prerequisites for the IN the LAB initiative. Previous recipients in this program are not eligible to apply in consecutive cycles.
Supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Visit the TCG website to register, and to download the guidelines and application form.
To read about the experiences of the Round 1 recipients visit the
TCG Circle
Need more information? Contact: Mohammad Shatara, Artistic Programs Associate, at mshatara@tcg.org
or (212) 609-5900 ext. 269
Deadline: ONLINE REGISTRATION & APPLICATION POSTMARK DEADLINE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012
WRITERS
Poets and Writers Magazine
The Best Books for Writers
Each week we recommend a book–a newly published title or an invaluable classic–that will help you on your writing journey. This week’s pick:
 August 9th, 2012
·          You Should Really Write a Book: How to Write, Sell, and Market Your Memoir
(St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012) by Regina Brooks and Brenda Lane Richardson
August 16, 2012
·          Several Short Sentences About Writing 
(Random House, 2012) by Verlyn Klinkenborg
  

Artists August 22, 2012

Arts Educators August 22, 2012


Arts Educators,
Below you will find information on the following:
  • Fresh Film NW opportunity for teen filmmakers – Aug 27 deadline
  • Funds available from Charlotte Martin Foundation
  • Education Grants for Teachers of Children Who Learn Differently
  • ARTLAB+, a New Conception of the Museum for Teens
  • Target Field Trip Grants
  • 2013 NEA National Heritage Fellowships and 2014 NEA Jazz Masters Fellowships nominations open
  • SEADAE Releases Report on Roles of Arts Educators
  • A framework and tools to measure the three main outcome areas which are characteristic of arts-based youth development programs
  • Art21 New Videos
  • Twitter Chat to Define Arts Integration
Information about unsubscribing to this online email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin
Education & Web Services Director
Montana Arts Council
PO Box 202201
Helena, MT 59620-2201
406-444-6522
Arts Education Hotline 800-282-3092
http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Fresh Film NW gives teens, ages 13-19, the opportunity to have their work juried by professional filmmakers and educators.  Winners will have their film shown during the Northwest Film Festival in Portland in November for the public.  They will also have their videos posted on Vimeo, where 16.000 people viewed them last year.
Here’s a link to more info including the submission form.  It’s free to enter.  New deadline is August 27:
We invite short films from the Northwest region, which includes Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Alaska.  We would love to have more representation from your state!
Funds for Youth Programs in the Pacific Northwest
Charlotte Martin Foundation
The Charlotte Martin Foundation supports nonprofit organizations that provide services in urban, rural, and tribal communities throughout Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. The Foundation is dedicated to funding projects that enrich the lives of youth (ages 6-18) in the areas of athletics, culture, and education. Grants are also provided for the preservation and protection of wildlife and habitat. The final application deadline for 2012 is September 30. Visit the Foundation’s website to review the goals and priorities for each of the Foundation’s program areas.

Education Grants for Teachers of Children Who Learn Differently

Applications are being accepted for the P. Buckley Moss Foundation’s Education Grants for projects that integrate the arts into educational programming. The mission of the P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children’s Education is to promote the integration of the arts into all educational programs, with a special focus on children who learn in different ways. The foundation’s Education Grants aid and support teachers who wish to establish an effective learning tool using the arts in teaching children with learning disabilities and other special needs.

Educators may apply for a grant up to $1,000 to support a new or evolving project. Visit the grant webpage (http://mossfoundation.org/national-educators-awards-and-grants) to learn about last year’s grant recipients and funded projects and for information on applying for 2012 grants. The application deadline is September 30, 2012.

From the National Endowment for the Arts
ARTLAB+, a New Conception of the Museum for Teens: The director of digital learning programs at the Hirshhorn’s ARTLAB+ writes about how his museum is using technology to reach new, teenage audiences.
Field Trips for K-12 Schools Supported
Target Field Trip Grants
The Target Field Trip Grants program provides funds for K-12 field trips in order to give students throughout the country the opportunity to explore more of the world outside the classroom. Over 5,000 grants of up to $700 each will be awarded to educators, teachers, principals, paraprofessionals, and classified staff who are employed by accredited K-12 public, private, or charter schools only. (Parents, PTOs, after-school programs, Pre-K centers, and other nonprofit organizations are not eligible to apply.) Types of eligible trips include art, science, and cultural museum visits; community service and civic projects; career enrichment opportunities; and other events or activities away from the school facility. Funds may be used from January 2013 until the end of the school year to cover trip-related costs such as transportation, ticket fees, food, resource materials, and supplies. Online applications must be submitted by October 1, 2012. Visit the Target website to learn more about the program. http://sites.target.com/site/en/company/page.jsp?contentId=WCMP04-031880&ref=sr_shorturl_fieldtrips
The National Endowment for the Arts is currently accepting nominations for both its 2013 NEA National Heritage Fellowships and 2014 NEA Jazz Masters Fellowships. Nominations must be submitted by October 1, 2012 at 5:30 p.m.
We hope you will consider nominating an artist and forwarding this information to your contacts who may be interested. Information specific to the NEA Jazz Masters and NEA National Heritage Fellowships can be found in the attached PDFs.
SEADAE Releases Report on Roles of Arts Educators

Roles of Certified Arts Educators, Certified Non-Arts Educators, & Providers of Supplemental Arts Instruction (by Lauren Kapalka Richerme, Scott C. Shuler, and Marcia McCaffrey, with Debora Hansen and Lynn Tuttle) is a powerful new resource for policymakers and everyone involved in arts education, recently released by the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE). As its title suggests, this meticulously documented publication outlines the training, experience, and skills that each of these three key partners contributes to ensuring a high-quality, sequential, standards-based arts education for all of America’s children. An eloquent foreward by Rachel Goslins, Executive Director of the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, highlights how the principles outlined in this SEADAE document can help our nation realize the vision of universal access to arts education outlined in the recently released PCAH report. Roles concludes by offering recommendations to the field for more effective educational collaborations and advocacy.

From 2008 to 2012, five youth arts organizations in and around Massachusetts—each working at the top of their game and each operating in very different contexts and together holding over one hundred years of field experience—collaborated to develop a framework and tools to measure the three main outcome areas which are characteristic of arts-based youth development programs.  Their project, the Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project, published the report of their work and findings, including the evaluation tools they developed and piloted, this spring.  We at the Massachusetts Cultural Council are proud to host the very rich fruits of their labor on our website: http://www.massculturalcouncil.org/services/youth_arts_evaluation.asp.
Art21 New Videos: Diana Al-Hadid and Sarah Sze
Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom
From the series, New York Close Up
In this film, artist Diana Al-Hadid and her crew of dedicated assistants strike a balance between work and play while finishing a new sculpture on a tight deadline.
Sarah Sze: Improvisation
From the series, Exclusive
Filmed in 2010 at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nice, France, Sarah Sze discusses the importance of improvisation and spontaneity during her installation process.
Twitter Chat to Define Arts Integration

Arts Education Partnership (@aep_arts) co-hosted a Twitter chat on Thursday, August 9 to define arts integration in 140 characters or less. The chat was moderated by Joan Weber of Creativity and Associates (@creativityassoc) and Elizabeth Peterson, founder of The Inspired Classroom (@eliza_peterson). A transcript with proposed definitions can be found HERE.

Participants came to this definition of arts integration:
“Arts integration is instruction that integrates content & skills from the arts and other disciplines to increase learning in both.”

Tell us what you think of this definition or propose a new one by visiting our Facebook page.

Arts Educators August 22, 2012

Arts Organizations August 22, 2012


Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on the following:
  • Fresh Film NW opportunity for teen filmmakers – Aug 27 deadline
  • Funds available from Charlotte Martin Foundation
  • Education Grants for Teachers of Children Who Learn Differently
  • Guidelines for NEA Research Grant Applications
  • Native American Programs Funded
  • 2013 NEA National Heritage Fellowships and 2014 NEA Jazz Masters Fellowships nominations open
  • TGC’s International Grant Program: Global Connections
  • Japan Foundation: Performing Arts Japan
  • Several items from Barry’s Blog – check it out
  • How Crowdsourcing can help your Nonprofit
  • A few good Point of Sales systems
  • A few good tools for Ticketed Events
  • Board Café: 12 Ways to get a new director off on the right foot
  • ARTLAB+, a New Conception of the Museum for Teens
  • A framework and tools to measure the three main outcome areas which are characteristic of arts-based youth development programs
  • 3 Job Openings – Holter Museum of Art ED closes Sept. 14th
Information about unsubscribing to this online email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin
Education & Web Services Director
Montana Arts Council
PO Box 202201
Helena, MT 59620-2201
406-444-6522
Arts Education Hotline 800-282-3092
http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Fresh Film NW gives teens, ages 13-19, the opportunity to have their work juried by professional filmmakers and educators.  Winners will have their film shown during the Northwest Film Festival in Portland in November for the public.  They will also have their videos posted on Vimeo, where 16.000 people viewed them last year.
Here’s a link to more info including the submission form.  It’s free to enter.  New deadline is August 27:
We invite short films from the Northwest region, which includes Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Alaska.  We would love to have more representation from your state!
Funds for Youth Programs in the Pacific Northwest
Charlotte Martin Foundation
The Charlotte Martin Foundation supports nonprofit organizations that provide services in urban, rural, and tribal communities throughout Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. The Foundation is dedicated to funding projects that enrich the lives of youth (ages 6-18) in the areas of athletics, culture, and education. Grants are also provided for the preservation and protection of wildlife and habitat. The final application deadline for 2012 is September 30. Visit the Foundation’s website to review the goals and priorities for each of the Foundation’s program areas.

Education Grants for Teachers of Children Who Learn Differently

Applications are being accepted for the P. Buckley Moss Foundation’s Education Grants for projects that integrate the arts into educational programming. The mission of the P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children’s Education is to promote the integration of the arts into all educational programs, with a special focus on children who learn in different ways. The foundation’s Education Grants aid and support teachers who wish to establish an effective learning tool using the arts in teaching children with learning disabilities and other special needs.

Educators may apply for a grant up to $1,000 to support a new or evolving project. Visit the grant webpage (http://mossfoundation.org/national-educators-awards-and-grants) to learn about last year’s grant recipients and funded projects and for information on applying for 2012 grants. The application deadline is September 30, 2012.

Guidelines Now Available for NEA Research Grant Applications

The National Endowment for the Arts’ Office of Research & Analysis announces that application guidelines are now available for funding through Research: ArtWorks. This program supports research that investigates the value of the U.S. arts ecosystem and the impact of the arts on other domains of American life.

The NEA encourages applicants from diverse research fields. Applicants must be non-profit organizations and are encouraged to partner with for-profit entities, and/or use commercial and/or administrative datasets (To see the grants awarded in the first year of Research: ArtWorks, click here).

The NEA anticipates awarding up to 25 grants in the range of $10,000 to $30,000. The deadline for application submission is November 6, 2012 for projects that can begin as early as May 1, 2013.

The NEA will hold an informational webinar for potential applicants on September 12, 2012.

Native American Programs Funded
Seventh Generation Fund for Indian Development
The Seventh Generation Fund for Indian Development is dedicated to promoting and maintaining the uniqueness of Native peoples and the sovereignty of tribal Nations throughout the Americas. The Fund’s primary grantmaking program areas include the following: Arts and Cultural Expression, Environmental Health and Justice, Human Rights, Sustainable Communities, Intergenerational Leadership, and Women’s Leadership. Grants from $500 to $5,000 are provided three times per year to Native communities that address one or more of the Fund’s program areas. The application deadlines are February 1, June 1, and October 1, annually. (Mini-grants of up to $500 are reviewed throughout the year.) Application guidelines and forms are available on the Fund’s website.
The National Endowment for the Arts is currently accepting nominations for both its 2013 NEA National Heritage Fellowships and 2014 NEA Jazz Masters Fellowships. Nominations must be submitted by October 1, 2012 at 5:30 p.m.
We hope you will consider nominating an artist and forwarding this information to your contacts who may be interested. Information specific to the NEA Jazz Masters and NEA National Heritage Fellowships can be found in the attached PDFs.
Now Available: Applications and Guidelines for
TCG’s International Grant Program
GLOBAL CONNECTIONS
ROUND 2 • CYCLE A
ONLINE REGISTRATION & APPLICATION POSTMARK DEADLINE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012
Global Connections encourages reciprocity and cultural exchange throughout the world by supporting the unrestricted travel and projects of professionals working in all aspects of theatre.
Recipients may use the funds to pursue theatre-based activities abroad or to host international colleagues within the U.S.  The grants are offered through two separate initiatives:
ON the ROAD travel grants will award six grants of up to $5,000 each, per cycle, to foster new relationships with international colleagues that will inspire each other’s work and aesthetics by creating opportunities for cultural exchange. This initiative is open to a broad range of theatre professionals from artists to administrators to those in production areas.
IN the LAB project development grants will award three grants of $10,000 each, per cycle, to further preexisting international collaborations by supporting residencies that either advance the research and development of a theatre piece or explore elements leading up to a full production. Projects do not need to result in a final mainstage production.
ON the ROAD grants are not prerequisites for the IN the LAB initiative. Previous recipients in this program are not eligible to apply in consecutive cycles.
Supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Visit the TCG website to register, and to download the guidelines and application form.
Support for Japanese Performing Arts Presentations in the U.S. and Canada
Japan Foundation: Performing Arts Japan
The mission of the Japan Foundation is to establish international cultural exchange and mutual understanding between Japan and other countries. The Foundation’s Performing Arts Japan (PAJ) program is designed to promote Japanese performing arts in North America. PAJ supports initiatives created by U.S. and Canadian nonprofit organizations to provide geographically diverse audiences with greater exposure to Japanese performing arts, as well as encouraging collaborations between Japanese and North American artists. The PAJ Touring Grants assist in the presentation of Japanese performing arts in the U.S. and Canada, emphasizing locations outside major metropolitan areas. The PAJ Collaboration Grants allow Japanese and American/Canadian artists to create new works that will further an appreciation of Japanese culture when presented to American/Canadian audiences. The application deadline is October 22, 2012. Visit the Japan Foundation website to download the PAJ funding guidelines.
Congratulations to Doug Borwick on publication of his book Building Communities, Not Audiences (Arts Engaged, Winston-Salem, 2012)  a bold, unapologetic, argument for moving the arts from its Euro-Centric base and towards more involvement (and relevance) to the changing demographic communities across the country by being more involved into responding to community needs.
 Whether or not you agree with Doug’s thesis that the only real way to save arts organizations is for them to address community needs as a primary part of their mission, there is a wealth of ideas and information from all those who contributed to this work – and the list is impressive – including Ben Cameron, Russell Willis Taylor, Barbara Schaffer Bacon, Pam Korza and Diane Ragsdale.  James Undercofler contributes a particularly informative brief synopsis of the various models arts organizations do, and might, consider using.  Bill Cleveland (the ‘Don’ of the Community Arts Movement) offers a valuable entry on Mapping the Terrain, and Margo Gard Ewell gives a useful historical perspective on the whole idea of Community Building and the Arts.
A Couple of Lists to Ponder Over Your Monday Morning Coffee
Alison Green writes the popular Ask a Manager blog,  where she dispenses advice on career, job search, and management issues. (She’s also the co-author of Managing to Change the World: The Nonprofit Manager’s Guide to Getting Results, and former chief of staff of a successful nonprofit organization, where she oversaw day-to-day staff management, hiring, firing, and employee development.)

This piece of career advice (from a post of hers in Newsweek online) seems valuable no matter where your career trajectory (on the way up or already there): “Wondering why you can’t get promoted to a managerial position? One or more of these 10 common problems might be the reason why:” 

HERE’S A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT KIND OF LIST – 10 Rules for Students, Teachers, and Life by John Cage and Corita Kent taken from my favorite site Brain Pickings:
New Report:  Set In Stone:  Building America’s New Generation of Arts Facilities 1994 – 2008.  http://culturalpolicy.uchicago.edu/setinstone/finalreport/  The University of Chicago’s Cultural Policy Center, a joint initiative of the Harris School of Public Policy and its affiliated research organization NORC, launched in 2007 a major study of cultural building  in the United States –focusing on a building boom that included museums, performing arts centers, and theaters. The goal of the study was to establish research that would serve as a basic and essential resource for any cultural group in the country engaged in planning construction, renovation, or expansion of their facilities.
“Setting” as a variable in the greater arts debates.
On the heel of last month’s release of Set In Stone / Buidling America’s New Generation of Arts Facilities – a massive study from the Cultural Policy Center at the University of Chicago, comes a new report –  All the World’s A Stage – Venues and Settings, and the Role they Play in Shaping Pattens of Arts Participation –  authored by Alan Brown – an excellent beginning analysis and discussion of the role of “setting” in attracting audiences and how artists work.
How Crowdsourcing Can Help Your Nonprofit
Crowdsourcing can help you harness the crowd to increase awareness, cultivate new volunteers, gather information and even get work done—all for a minimal investment. How can you put it to work for you?
A Few Good Point Of Sales Systems
From museum stores to gift shops, organizations with retail storefronts need Point Of Sales solutions that help process transactions, provide reporting, and manage inventory. What are the options in this area?
A Few Good Tools for Ticketed Events
Ticketing tools let you sell tickets, assign seating, and in many cases, track attendance at your organization’s events. What should you look for in a good ticketing tool, and how can it help your nonprofit?

Twelve Ways to Get a New Executive Director Off on the Right Foot

When a new executive is hired, the board usually breathes a huge sigh of relief. They have likely been working extra hard for weeks or months interviewing candidates or taking on additional tasks, such as managing a fundraising event or overseeing the audit. If you’re on a board, before you turn over the reins to a new leader, consider these fast ideas to help get the executive get started on a path to success:
  • Hang in there just a bit longer. It’s understandable that board members want to relax once the new executive director is in place, but stay in there at continued intensity for a while longer, and make sure the executive has the support she needs to get off to a great start. A new executive may be reluctant to ask board members to do something, or may be new to the community or field as well. Tip: Assign a committee or an officer to take on the job of monitoring the needs of the new ED. To read more: http://blueavocado.org/node/767
From the National Endowment for the Arts
ARTLAB+, a New Conception of the Museum for Teens: The director of digital learning programs at the Hirshhorn’s ARTLAB+ writes about how his museum is using technology to reach new, teenage audiences.
From 2008 to 2012, five youth arts organizations in and around Massachusetts—each working at the top of their game and each operating in very different contexts and together holding over one hundred years of field experience—collaborated to develop a framework and tools to measure the three main outcome areas which are characteristic of arts-based youth development programs.  Their project, the Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project, published the report of their work and findings, including the evaluation tools they developed and piloted, this spring.  We at the Massachusetts Cultural Council are proud to host the very rich fruits of their labor on our website: http://www.massculturalcouncil.org/services/youth_arts_evaluation.asp.
JOB OPENINGS
The Holter Museum of Artin Helena, Montana seeks a full-time individual with outstanding leadership skills, experienced in financial management and resource development to serve as its Executive Director. The Museum, in operation for twenty-five years, has regional prominence in contemporary art exhibition and maintains a permanent collection of leading regional contemporary and modern artists. It maintains a rigorous and vibrant exhibition schedule and extensive, innovative education programs for adult and young participants. The ideal candidate will have proven experience in fund raising, donor development, and grant acquisition that will ensure the Museum’s stability and long-term sustainability and growth. The Executive Director will oversee all museum operations, help to refine strategic goals, oversee the Museum’s administrative operations (policies, monthly and annual budgeting, physical plant, bookkeeping) and manage the staff of 6 FTE’s. The Executive Director reports to the Museum’s Board of Trustees and works in collaboration with all standing and ad hoc committees of the Board. A full job description is posted at www.holtermuseum.org. Candidates should send a written letter of application, curriculum vitae, and a list of three professional references to Museum Search Committee/ Holter Museum of Art/ 12 East Lawrence Street/ Helena, MT  59601. The application period will close on September 14, 2012.
See attached PDF for more info
Cal Performances, at the University of California-Berkeley, is seeking a Performing Arts Academic Liaison

The Performing Arts Academic Liaison is responsible for the planning, management, execution and growth of Cal Performances’ academic programs; building partnerships with academic units; and facilitating the Performing Arts and Performing Arts for Future Presidents course. Cal Performances strongly encourages recently-graduated MFAs or PhDs with an interest in working at the intersection of performing arts and academia to apply.

To learn more about this opportunity, please visit: http://calperformances.org/about/jobs.php  Also see attached PDF

National Guild Program Director Position
The full job description is attached and also available here: http://www.nationalguild.org/Job-Board/Job-Listings/Program-Director-(1).aspx
Here are a few details:
Working as part of our senior leadership team, the new Program Director will help us strengthen and grow our programs and services for maximum impact, and develop our strategic priorities which include collaborations within, and beyond, the arts sector. We believe these kinds of collaborations hold promise for increasing the impact of our member organizations and expanding equitable access to arts learning opportunities for all. We are seeking a candidate with a passion for and understanding of the arts’ role in transforming individuals and communities. Professionals with more than 10 years of experience in arts education or a related field such as youth development, community development, social services, public policy etc. are preferred.
Key responsibilities include:
  • Developing and executing plans that support the Guild’s strategic priorities
  • Directing the production of our annual Conference for Community Arts Education and other professional development programs
  • Leading and managing re-granting programs; and
  • Developing the activities, discussions, and resources of our regional chapters.
Arts Organizations August 22, 2012

Recreating Education for our Children


Of course I’m going to post this…..  I have a degree in biology AND I’m a forever farm kid…..
 
Notes from a conference on art of science learning
Susan Sclafani, “Recreating Education for our Children.”

Questions
In questions and comments, when asked to say more about how this vision for the arts in education can be implemented, Scalfani said that this required a very complex answer, providing which was one of the functions of the conference. However, she would say overall that there needed to be more of an emphasis on the more dynamic activities associated with the arts. There was, she said, too much “reading the book and answering the questions” and too little active exploration in schools.

A participant seconded this by remarking that in her experience it was the “farm kids” who get science more easily as they have more time playing outside and experimenting in the real world.

Recreating Education for our Children