Arts Organizations 9-27-2011

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on a new initiative for museums, the ArtPlace initiative, support is available to American dance, music, and theater ensembles and solo artists that have been invited to perform at international festivals, Southern Exposure: Performing Arts of Latin America, walk Through Testing an Email Fundraising Campaign, three items from the Artful Manager blog, from Blue Avocado: Myths about non-profits going the scale, Six Dos and Six Don’ts with Social Media, The Governance/Support Model for Nonprofit Boards.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
The American Association of Museums’s (AAM) Center for the Future of Museums, EmcArts, and MetLife Foundation announce the launch of a major new initiative designed to enable selected museums to design, research and prototype innovations, testing novel approaches to field-wide challenges in a laboratory-like setting. The initiative is entitled the Innovation Lab for Museums, and is now accepting proposals at www.aam-us.org and www.EmcArts.org. The deadline for proposals is October 31, 2011.
Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts Convene Private Partners and Federal Agencies to Launch the ArtPlace Initiative
In an unprecedented privatepublic collaboration, 11 of America’s top foundations have joined with the National Endowment for the Arts and seven federal agencies to establish ArtPlace (http://www.artplaceamerica.org/), a nationwide initiative to drive revitalization in cities and towns with a new investment model that puts the arts at the center of economic development.
ArtPlace today announced its first round of grants, investing $11.5 million in 34 locally initiated projects in cities from Honolulu to Miami. Each project supported by ArtPlace has been selected for developing a new model of helping towns and cities thrive, by strategically integrating artists and arts organizations into key local efforts in  transportation, housing, community development, job creation and more.
ArtPlace has initiated its second funding cycle. A Letter of Inquiry posted today on http://www.artplaceamerica.org/  Submissions may be made through November 15, 2011.
Carol Coletta is the director of ArtPlace, based in Chicago, and she may be reached at: ccoletta@artplaceamerica.org  (312)264-6581
(see more about this program below in Artful Manager post – Beck)
Support for Participation in International Arts Festivals
USArtists International
USArtists International, administered by the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, is committed to ensuring that the impressive range of the performing arts in the United States is represented abroad, and that American artists can enhance their creative and professional development through the exchange of ideas and practices with their colleagues in other countries and through exposure to new audiences. Support is available to American dance, music, and theater ensembles and solo artists that have been invited to perform at international festivals and engagements that represent extraordinary career opportunities anywhere in the world outside of the United States. Grants, which generally range from $1,000 to $10,000, will seldom cover the applicant’s total expenses. The upcoming application deadlines are December 9, 2011, and April 20, 2012. Eligibility details and application guidelines are available on the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation website.
Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation announces the availability of the online application for the innaugural grant round of Southern Exposure: Performing Arts of Latin America, a program designed to bring exemplary contemporary and traditional dance, music and theater artists from Latin America to audiences across the United States. Southern Exposure will support projects that are developed collaboratively by presenter consortia based in the United States and its territories that include public performances and complementary activities intended to build appreciation for the artists’ work and cultures. The program will invest in projects in which the presenting organizations work with a variety of community partners to offer the public opportunities for significant engagement with the visiting artists. The application receipt deadline for the 2012-2013 Southern Exposure program is February 10, 2012. Program guidelines and the application are available here.
Nonprofit Online News: http://news.gilbert.org/
+ Walk Through Testing an Email Fundraising Campaign from Oxfam America
   Writing for NTEN Change, Gwen Emmons and Marc Ruben of M+R Strategic Services Walk Us Through Testing an Email Fundraising Campaign from Oxfam America. (I’m linking to an excerpt because the full article is buried in an unlinkable PDF. Fortunately, the PDF issue of Change is freely available.) My hope for this article is that it will help demystify testing to the thousands of organizations who know they should be doing it, but don’t. What’s important about this piece is the way it…
   Read the rest of this post:
   Straight to the article:
THE ARTFUL MANAGER a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
THE SHIFTING LINE BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE…
Several articles and events this month explore the narrow margin between public/nonprofit and private enterprise. As each sector bleeds ever more into the other, it’s worth reflecting on why we have two in the first place.
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2011
MAKING CREATIVE PLACES…
There’s been lots of talk about ‘creative placemaking’ and ‘creative vitality’ in cities and towns and communities. An intriguing new public-private initiative is diving in to get it done.
Posted: Thursday, September 15, 2011
ART, CONTROVERSY, AND COMMUNITY…
Colleague and friend Steven J. Tepper released a rather extraordinary book this August on the dynamics and anatomy of controversy surrounding the arts. The effort is an invaluable record not only of our times, but also of our business in the arts.
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011
Only Bad Restaurants Go to Scale
By Jan Masaoka
We in nonprofits are good at taking on myths and sacred cows. But perhaps the least examined of these myths is the one about “going to scale.” This OpEd takes a closer but brief look at the conventional wisdom in this area:
Myth #1: Nonprofits don’t go to scale (get a lot bigger) because they lack the vision or the ambition
The reality here is that the dominant capital markets for nonprofits — government and foundations — actively work against nonprofit growth.
Regarding foundations, the common funding policy of “one smallish grant per organization per year” means increased volume doesn’t lead to larger foundation grants. In fact, when nonprofits grow, many foundations become less interested in them. A commonly stated reason is “we want to feel where our size grant can really make a difference” . . . which often translates to “we feel better funding organizations where we are one of their most important funders.”
Government — overall the biggest funder of nonprofits — is not only the biggest engine for growth but also the biggest barrier to growth. To read more: http://blueavocado.org/node/697
Six Dos and Six Don’ts with Social Media
By Kaitlyn Trigger
Are you sick of people telling you a hundred things your nonprofit should be doing with social media? (We are.) Wouldn’t it be nicer to be told what NOT to do so that you can feel good about not doing it?
For a change of pace, we talked with Kaitlyn Trigger, Marketing Director at Rally, a startup developing online tools for fundraising. Her unconventional tips:
Ultimately, understanding yourself and your audience is more central to a successful social media presence than mastering the minutiae of Facebook, Twitter, and  YouTube. Nevertheless, there are a few guidelines that can help you maintain good social media “hygiene” and avoid shiny new distractions:
The Governance/Support Model for Nonprofit Boards
Board Cafe • By Jan Masaoka
Much of the confusion about board responsibilities is confusion between what the board does (as a body) and what individual board members should do. Most of the prescriptions for boards confuse the two, saying “The board should _____” without making the distinction This straightforward model for boards has been embraced by thousands of boards across the United States:
There are two fundamentally different types of nonprofit board responsibility: governance and support. Depending on the responsibility, three types of switches occur:
  • Who’s the boss
  • Whether the board is acting as a body or as individual board members
  • Who the board is representing
·        Let’s look at both types of responsibility, and the three types of switches.

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Arts Organizations 9-27-2011

Arts Educators 9-27-2011

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information about a new  piece of legislation on STEM to STEAM, 2012 Scholastic Awards are now open, an article on art, controversy and community; and three new Art21 videos.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
A note from my colleague in Rhode Island – Beck
As I think I’ve mentioned before, our state rep Jim Langevin is taking the lead nationally on STEM to STEAM.  There is actually now a piece of legislation that you can encourage your state reps to support.  Go here for the resolution:  http://thomas.loc.gov/home/gpoxmlc112/hr319_ih.xml
There is a major meeting here today about the push to move this forward, so I’ll keep you updated.  I think this is a great opportunity for us to embed ourselves in a national agenda.  For more about the meeting here and the shape it’s taking go to: http://stemtosteam.org/ 
  
Sherilyn Brown
Education Director
Rhode Island State Council on the Arts
                                                                                                                                 
2012 Scholastic Awards Now Open for Submissions
Everything these people create is images so I can’t copy text. I did manage to get our regional deadlines below – Beck
Bottom of Form
Art Deadline: 01/06/2012
Writing Deadline: 01/06/2012
Video Game Deadline: 01/09/2012
Novel Deadline: 02/17/2012
THE ARTFUL MANAGER a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
ART, CONTROVERSY, AND COMMUNITY…
Colleague and friend Steven J. Tepper released a rather extraordinary book this August on the dynamics and anatomy of controversy surrounding the arts. The effort is an invaluable record not only of our times, but also of our business in the arts.
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011
Art21 New Videos: Mika Tajima, Keltie Ferris, and Cindy Sherman
Mika Tajima Versus the Cubicle
New York Close Up Episode #013: How does design shape society? In this film, artist Mika Tajima traces the legacy of the influential Action Office furniture line-developed by Herman Miller-and how it serves as the inspiration for her own work. 
Keltie Ferris Spray Paints in Solitude
New York Close Up Episode #014: How does an artist connect to the world while working alone? In this film, artist Keltie Ferris begins a new series of abstract paintings in her Bushwick, Brooklyn studio.
Cindy Sherman: Fashion
Exclusive Episode #143: Commissioned by French Vogue to create a fashion editorial featuring clothes from the Spanish design house Balenciaga, artist Cindy Sherman discusses the first time she used a digital camera to make pictures, ultimately creating different versions of images for the magazine and for herself.

Arts Educators 9-27-2011

Artists 9-27-2011

Artists,
Below you will find an article of general interest, three new videos from Art21, one opportunity for performing artists and three for visual artists.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
THE ARTFUL MANAGER a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
ART, CONTROVERSY, AND COMMUNITY…
Colleague and friend Steven J. Tepper released a rather extraordinary book this August on the dynamics and anatomy of controversy surrounding the arts. The effort is an invaluable record not only of our times, but also of our business in the arts.
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011
Art21 New Videos: Mika Tajima, Keltie Ferris, and Cindy Sherman
Mika Tajima Versus the Cubicle
New York Close Up Episode #013: How does design shape society? In this film, artist Mika Tajima traces the legacy of the influential Action Office furniture line-developed by Herman Miller-and how it serves as the inspiration for her own work. 
Keltie Ferris Spray Paints in Solitude
New York Close Up Episode #014: How does an artist connect to the world while working alone? In this film, artist Keltie Ferris begins a new series of abstract paintings in her Bushwick, Brooklyn studio.
Cindy Sherman: Fashion
Exclusive Episode #143: Commissioned by French Vogue to create a fashion editorial featuring clothes from the Spanish design house Balenciaga, artist Cindy Sherman discusses the first time she used a digital camera to make pictures, ultimately creating different versions of images for the magazine and for herself.
PERFORMING ARTS
Support for Participation in International Arts Festivals
USArtists International
USArtists International, administered by the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, is committed to ensuring that the impressive range of the performing arts in the United States is represented abroad, and that American artists can enhance their creative and professional development through the exchange of ideas and practices with their colleagues in other countries and through exposure to new audiences. Support is available to American dance, music, and theater ensembles and solo artists that have been invited to perform at international festivals and engagements that represent extraordinary career opportunities anywhere in the world outside of the United States. Grants, which generally range from $1,000 to $10,000, will seldom cover the applicant’s total expenses. The upcoming application deadlines are December 9, 2011, and April 20, 2012. Eligibility details and application guidelines are available on the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation website.
VISUAL ARTS
Butte Copper City Artists will sponsor a holiday gift store in the downstairs gallery of the Arts Chateau in Butte, Montana.  The store will run from Friday, November 25, 2011 through Friday, December 23, 2011.  All original arts and crafts are welcome.  A 35% commission will be taken and proceeds will benefit the Arts Chateau.  For information and an application please contact Janice Bogy, 406-494-5558 (home); 406-490-3364 (cell); pj_wolf@earthlink.net (there is an underscore between “pj” and “wolf”).
CdA Arts Commission seeks Artists for Education Corridor
The City of Coeur d’Alene Arts Commission is seeking artists for three (3) vehicular round-a-bouts in the “Education Corridor,” which is the new entrance into the historic Fort Grounds neighborhood, including North Idaho College and the satellite campuses of the University of Idaho and Lewis-Clark State College, and the Wastewater Treatment Plant.  It is anticipated that the public art will embody the area’s diverse and rich history, the vibrant present, and the bright future.
Information packets are available at City Hall, 710 E. Mullan Avenue, or online at http://www.cdaid.org/Artist proposals are due by 5:00 p.m., November 24, 2011.  Artists with questions are encouraged to contact Steve Anthony, Arts Commission Liaison, at stevea@cdaid.org.  
To view the Call to Artists, please click on the following link:
Embracing Our Differences invites art submissions for its 9th annual outdoor art exhibit celebrating diversity. National and international submissions are encouraged. 39 artists will be selected for the exhibit. The Exhibit will be displayed April and May 2012 at Island Park along Sarasota, Florida’s beautiful bayfront. Since 2004, the exhibit has been viewed by more than 1,100,000 visitors. The exhibit will contain 39 billboard-sized (16 feet wide by 12 1/2 feet high) images of the selected artworks.
Final selections will be chosen based on artistic excellence in reflection of the theme “embracing our differences”. Submissions will also be evaluated on how effectively it will read outdoors when enlarged to billboard size. Final selections will be made by a 3-judge panel of professional artists, curators and art professionals. A total of $3,000.00 in awards will be presented.
Submissions must be postmarked no later than January 9, 2012. There is no submission fee nor limit on the number of entries.
                
Submission forms and more information concerning past winning entries are available at http://www.embracingourdifferences.org/ or by emailing Info@EmbracingOurDifferences.org.

Artists 9-27-2011

MNA & Social Media

If you go to http://www.mtnonprofit.org/PPNE_IT/#Resources , you will find resources to help you with the planning process in determining what types of social media are right for your organization. Either of the first two links (Idealware & MarketingSavant) will help you with your planning discussions and decision-making. They also include some sample surveys you can use to learn what tools  your constituents are using.  In these and the report from NTEN is data that shows what tools other nonprofits are using and what is working best for them. There are additional links on this page for creating your own social media policy.
MNA & Social Media

Top 10 Fundraising Tips

Here’s a Great Article from Guidestar

Top 10 Fundraising Tips

July 2011
Compiled from Darian Rodriguez Heyman, ed., Nonprofit Management 101: A Complete and Practical Guide for Leaders and Professionals

  1. How to get your board more involved in fundraising:
    Stage a Board Member Thank-a-Thon

    Tons of nonprofits experience frustration with getting their boards to fundraise; in fact, it’s the second biggest reason why executive directors leave their posts, according to CompassPoint’s “Daring to Lead” study. An easy way to give board members a chance to dip their toes in the waters of donor engagement is staging a thank-a-thon. The key is to make it easy for board members to participate, and to help them understand that fundraising is much more than making an ask. By inviting your board members to come together one evening or weekend to call and thank recent donors, they will get exposure interacting with donors and will leave feeling empowered and connected to your organization’s work. This activity will also help improve relationships with your donors, who will be delighted to receive a thank you call without an attached ask.

  2. How to increase your chances of getting a grant:
    Never Apply for a Grant Without Contacting the Foundation First

    As much as you might want to believe that grants are awarded simply due to the fit of the program and the excellence of the application, it simply isn’t true. In fact in our experience, the odds of getting a grant that you send in without contacting the foundation are about 5 percent-10 percent. Just as in individual (and all!) fundraising, developing relationships is critical. There are people at these foundations, called program officers, who are directly responsible for deciding who gets money and who doesn’t. They care deeply about the work they are funding, and consider it an advantage to be able to scope out potential grantees. In-person meetings with program officers are ideal, but even a short phone call with a grant manager or administrator can still yield the basic information you need as well as getting your name in the mind of someone at the foundation.
    Sometimes these initial conversations can save you valuable time in applying for a grant program that was not a fit—always do your homework on their funding goals ahead of time! But often, they are valuable knowledge-gathering sessions: use the call or meeting to identify the funder’s key priorities and desired language, which many times cannot be found on the organization’s Web site; figure out which of your programs or initiatives is the best fit;, and determine how much money you should request. Finally, go out on a limb and ask if they would be willing to preview your LOI (Letter of Intent) or proposal before you submit it officially. This advance look will give them a sense of ownership over your request and provide you with valuable feedback. Start today by calling the offices of your top foundation prospects and seeing if you can get on a relevant program officer’s schedule.

  3. How to secure a donation:
    Make Specific and Direct Asks for Money

    People give because they are asked—if you don’t ask, the answer will always be no. It can be tough to look someone in the eyes and ask for money, but somewhere in your pitch, some variation of the words “I’d like to invite you to invest $100 in our work” need to find their place, ideally followed by as long a pause as it takes to get an answer. For fundraisers, you can’t make the mistake of not asking because you feel greedy or you think they will know what you want. Ask with pride for the cause you are so committed to raising money for, and be honored to be the potential bridge for that donor from need to impact, donation to solution. Be sure to ask for a specific amount (something that’s a stretch, but not unrealistic), and be clear about exactly what you will spend the money on and the impact it will generate. Tell the story of someone you’ve served who enjoyed the impact of these types of donations. Start today by calling a lapsed donor and asking for a small renewal gift, even if it’s $25! Practice this type of direct and specific ask on your board members, coworkers, family, and friends, and in no time you will be a master fundraiser.

  4. How to build loyal, happy donors:
    Map Donations to Impact

    People don’t give to you because you have needs; they give to you because you meet needs. Donors and prospects don’t want to hear about the woes of the economy or your organizational struggles—no one wants to join a sinking ship. Instead, they want to know exactly where their donations will go, or have gone, and what impact your work is having on their community and the issues they care about. Use the power of personal stories to demonstrate how critical and important their support is to your work. Emphasize impact and stories in all of your communications with donors, both in person and in your written materials. Make sure that you send timely thank you notes, reports on progress and success, and ongoing communications to build loyalty and trust with your donors. Start by sending a handwritten note to your best donor today!

  5. How to raise more money online:
    Make Your Donation Button Shine

    Online fundraising is a critical component of any individual fundraising strategy. It’s the fastest-growing piece of the development pie, plus when people hear about your organization, want to learn more, or seek updates on your work, they will visit your Web site. It is critical to make sure that visitors can find your donation button within two seconds of clicking on your home page. This means that the button should be sizeable, colorful, prominent, and “above the fold,” meaning it’s visible on the page without the need to scroll down. Play around with different iterations if you can and carefully note the impact on conversation rates and donation amounts—Network for Good performed a test on their Web site and witnessed a 30 percent greater conversion when they changed their donation button from gray to red. Conversion at the last mile is key, so analyze how many people click on the button versus how many actually donate. If the link doesn’t go straight to the donation page, fix it! You should also get creative and use images or different words to relate a donation to something tangible, e.g. “donate a mosquito net” or “save a litter of kittens.”

  6. How to raise money on Facebook:
    Create and Tap Your Social Network

    If you’ve been avoiding getting your organization involved in Facebook, here are three good reasons to rethink that decision:

    1. Facebook has an audience of 600 million and growing, making it equivalent to the population of the world’s third-largest country.
    2. Meet them where they’re at: it is extremely likely that a considerable amount of your wired network is already engaged on the platform.
    3. More and more donations are happening online.

    Here are a few guidelines for getting started with Facebook:
    First, create a “Page” for your organization—this is similar to a personal profile. It allows members to become a “friend” of your nonprofit, allowing them to subscribe to your updates and engage in dialogue with you and other supporters. To set up your Facebook Page, visit www.facebook.com/pages/create.php.
    Second, create a Facebook Group: If you are interested in sending direct messages to the in-boxes of your supporters (and you have fewer than 5,000 followers), setting up a group is the way to go. Without a group, you are limited to posting status updates and having your supporters read them via their Facebook News Feed. To set up your group, visit http://www2.guidestar.org/rxa/news/articles/2011/www.facebook.com/groups/create.php.
    Once you are established on Facebook and your supporters are accustomed to communicating with you through this platform, it is time to start raising money. “Causes” is a tool (application) built for Facebook that allows you to fundraise within the Facebook network. Although it’s difficult to build a community within Causes, it’s worth exploring as a fundraising supplement to your Page or Group. Get a better feel for this tool at http://www.causes.com/.
    Once you are set up on Facebook, a great tip for integrating fundraising activities is to use the platform generously and frequently to express thanks for member contributions—public recognition helps spread loyalty and reinforces generous support.

  7. How to secure corporate support:
    Pursue In-Kind Donations, Contributed Media, and Technical Expertise

    Especially since the economic downturn, it’s become much more common for nonprofits and corporations to enter into partnerships that are less focused on direct financial support. In business they say “profits equals income minus expenses,” and similarly for nonprofits, reducing operating costs is just as important as bringing more money in the door. Even in tough times like those we’re going through, many companies are able to provide non-cash support that can be just as crucial as a monetary donation. Here are three budget-relieving examples we encourage you to pursue:
    In-Kind Support: Make-A-Wish Foundation of America has been particularly successful at developing what are called “cause-related marketing” partnerships with a variety of airlines, hotels, and travel providers. In their case, the nonprofit receives travel services that can be used in granting wishes. These donations save money that would have otherwise been expended, and is critical to fulfilling, the foundation’s mission of granting wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions. Whether it’s donated beer and wine for your next gala, free computers, or getting your airfare comped, how can corporate in-kind support advance your efforts and add money to your bottom line?
    Contributed Media: The U.S. Fund for UNICEF has developed an innovative partnership with top advertising agencies. The agencies approach the companies they normally buy ad space from and ask them to donate time to support UNICEF’s Believe in Zero campaign. Each year UNICEF receives more than $10 million in donated media to raise awareness for mission-critical initiatives, allowing them to deliver a call to action to targeted audiences. This relationship has been critical to the UNICEF and has resulted in them saving 2,000 lives every day—that’s direct mission impact. But you don’t have to be a huge global player to secure contributed media—call your local TV or radio station and ask if they’re able to produce a PSA (public service announcement) for you and air it!
    Technical Expertise: As part of their relationship with United Way of King County, the Seattle office of a global accounting firm reviewed United Way’s IT infrastructure. They provided pro bono recommendations on how multiple databases could be integrated to provide more timely, accurate information, thereby improving United Way’s service delivery. Although United Way isn’t a mom and pop shop, they wouldn’t have been able to pay for this kind of support. At the same time, the accounting firm enjoyed engaging employees in community building, building team morale. Whatever your size, look for a pro bono lawyer and accountant as well as technical support providers and other volunteer roles that may be filled by talented professionals.

  8. How to bring more donors to your cause:
    Apply for a Google Grant

    Getting new potential supporters into your pipeline is a key concern for any nonprofit—cutting through the clutter and marketing yourself is a key component of bringing new donors to your organization. Google provides many free tools and opportunities to help nonprofits spread the word about their good work: Google Grants for online advertising, expanded YouTube channels, Google Apps software, and premium Google Earth features. And now U.S.-based nonprofits can fill out a simple application to access all of these free services at www.google.com/nonprofits as well as access tips on how to make the most of Google’s software, and their new nonprofit marketplace, which lists companies that offer free or discounted services to nonprofits.
    At the very least, definitely sign up for a Google Grant (www.google.com/grants). A Google Grant will get you $10,000 per month in free “AdWords” advertising, so people see your link above the other results when they search Google. It’s an easy way for you to get more exposure for your cause, which is key to raising more money.

  9. How to produce a profitable fundraising event:
    Create a Winning Budget

    Ensuring that an event is fun, profitable, and not overly taxing on your staff is no easy task. Approach events with the same methodology used for capital campaigns or strategic planning: with ample time, realistic goals, and a clear sense of the desired outcome. Anyone who has planned an event knows they are like home renovations—they seem to cost twice as much and take twice as long as you expect.
    Let’s talk next about money. Many nonprofits fall into the trap of poor budgeting, investing time and money, only to break even or incur a loss at the end of an event. A budget that is realistic, detailed, and carefully managed is one of the best tools in your toolbox. Envision all aspects of your event, account for every component that has a cost associated with it, and think through how you’re going to raise money and what’s realistic. Identify items and services you need to get donated, but be very conservative with your in-kind donation estimates. Notwithstanding our comments in Tip 7, organizations often erroneously assume that they can throw an entire event based on donated goods and services. Finally, add a 5 percent–10 percent contingency line item to cover unexpected costs without breaking your budget.
    Consider the 2-to-1 ratio. If you raise $2 for every $1 you spend, that’s considered a respectable expense/income ratio. Even if you’re planning a modest fundraiser with the goal of bringing in $500 for your project, you still need to create a realistic budget and time line, just as you would for a large gala.

  10. How to fundraise for your social enterprise:
    Understand the Social Capital Market

    Nonprofits and social enterprises need money to start their businesses, but they often can’t go to the same sources as a small business operator. The “social capital market” is a very different world, with different rules.
    “Social capital market” is a term widely used to describe loans, program-related investments, and other financing tools that are made available by foundations, government agencies, corporations, and individuals to support nonprofit ventures. Unfortunately, though, it’s not well coordinated or organized.
    Also, the social capital market is much smaller than traditional capital markets, which include bank loans, venture capital, and private equity. Traditional money is usually unavailable to nonprofits since they cannot issue equity (ownership) in their businesses without spinning them off, which creates a series of other considerations and challenges. The social market focuses on social impact—hence the term “impact investor”—before financial return, which is inherently much harder to gauge and monitor. As such it does not have the innate efficiency or discipline of the traditional market.
    If you are going to start a social business, be prepared to spend an inordinate amount of time raising money. By most estimates, traditional businesses invest 3 percent–5 percent of leadership time raising funds for a venture, with the rest devoted to making the business work. Many social enterprises spend 20 percent–50 percent of their leadership time raising money, a potentially significant distraction from the actual work of the organization. Be aware of the need to spend this amount of time raising funds, and check out relevant forums such as Investors Circle, Social Venture Network, and SoCap for leads—knowing what you’re getting into is half the battle.

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© 2011, nonprofits101.org. Compiled from Darian Rodriguez Heyman, ed., Nonprofit Management 101: A Complete and Practical Guide for Leaders and Professionals; printed with permission.
Nonprofits101.org delivers practical insights and easy-to-implement solutions for professionals and organizations seeking to meet mission and maximize impact. The site is a companion resource to the new book Nonprofit Management 101: A Complete and Practical Guide for Leaders and Professionals. Edited by Darian Rodriguez Heyman, the former executive director of Craigslist Foundation, Nonprofit Management 101 is a comprehensive handbook that features actionable insights from 50 leading practitioners across 35 topics.
Note: The views expressed in this article are those of the author and may or may not represent GuideStar’s opinions. GuideStar is committed to providing a range of topics and perspectives to our users. We make every effort to obtain articles from knowledgeable, trustworthy sources, but we make no warranties or representations with regard to articles written by persons outside GuideStar.

Top 10 Fundraising Tips

Two Arts in Healing Opportunities

Cancer, Courage
Creativity

CLASSES RUN EIGHT SEQUENTIAL WEEKS

Living Art of Montana – Missoula Workshops

We provide a comfortable nurturing environment. With respect
for your privacy and to allow for building relationships, it is a
closed group (not a drop-in).

FALL WORKSHOP • Tuesdays September 27 – November 15, 2011
Register by Thursday September 22, 2011
5:30 – 7:30 pm
(September 27, October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15)
SPRING WORKSHOP • Wednesdays February 1- March 21, 2012
Register by Thursday January 26, 2012
5:30 – 7:30 pm
(February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 14, 21, 2012)
COST
This workshop is provided free of charge. CCC is made
possible through the generous donations of businesses,
individuals and volunteers. Donations are not expected but
always appreciated. If you are interested in donating to this
program please contact us.

LOCATION
Living Art Studio

REGISTER
Contact
Youpa Stein, MA, RDT
Director Living Art of Montana
406.549.5329 or
Visit livingartofmontana.org or
Warehouse Mall • 725 W Alder, Ste 17 • Missoula, MT 59802
Email ysteinprograms@livingartofmontana.org

Creative Connections
for Cancer Survivors


Living Arts of Montana –Missoula Workshops

3rd Wednesday of Each Month 12—1:30pm

This is a once a month opportunity for cancer
survivors to express themselves through the arts
find connections to self, others and nature.

September 21
Guest Facilitator: Char Houska, RN ~
Breast Care Coordinator, St. Patrick
Hospital
Title: “Flower Pounding: The Use of
Flowers to Dye Fabric or Paper”
Description: Flower pounding is a
traditional technique for transferring leaf &
flower patterns, colors, and shapes to cloth or
paper. You can produce beautiful designs
quickly & easily, with a hammer, fabric or
paper, a few flowers, leaves and/or grasses.

October 19
Guest Facilitator: Michelle Weaver
Knowles, RNC, BSN ~ Certified Breast
Health Navigator at Montana Breast Health
at Community Medical Center
Title: Shibori Dyed Silk Scarves
Description: Shibori is a Japanese word for
methods of dyeing by binding, stitching,
folding, twisting, compressing or capping.
Patterns are created by the type of fabric and
how you manipulate it. Your silk scarf will
be finished at the completion of the workshop
& you can call yourself a fiber artist!

Call if you can ~ it helps with our supply planning ~ 549-5329 or just drop-in for the workshop
Living Art Studio 725 W. Alder, #17 (Warehouse Mall, Missoula)
ysteinprograms@livingartofmontana.org or
http://www.livingartofmontana.org/

See their website for other workshops and dates.

Arts Organizations 9-14-2011

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on a free webinar that is tomorrow the 15th, Chamber Music America’s Presenting Jazz initiative, funds for modern art initiatives, Costco Wholesale Corporate Contributions Program, guide to help nonprofits implement their strategic plans, interactive map that shows the demographic makeup of legislators in each state, Hiring and Working with an Evaluator, and the Curator of Education position is open at Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Arts Reach Free Webinar:
Hot Tips from the Upcoming Arts Reach National Arts Marketing, Development and Ticketing Conference
September 15, 11:00 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. PST
(This Webinar is open to anyone. Unlike other Arts Reach Webinars, you do not have to be a current member to attend.)
Get key insights and tips on how you can recession-proof your organization. Join John Zorn, Michelle Paul, and Rick Lester for an advice-packed preview of the upcoming October conference in San Francisco.
John Zorn, Executive Director of Arts Reach, will give a brief synopsis of the highlights of all three days of the conference.

Then, hear from two of the main presenters at the conference as they update us on critical ways to increase revenue and illustrate easy steps you can take right now to flourish in uncertain times.

John will turn the webinar over to Michelle Paul, Product Manager of Patron Technology, who will discuss “Social Media FAQs: Seven Answers About Facebook and Twitter for the Arts.” She will cover your social media questions, like “How often should I post?” and “How should we handle negativity in comments?” and conclude with the one answer that will help you find social media success.

Following Michelle, Rick Lester, Founder and CEO of TRG Arts, will address the question: “Is your pricing strategy working or leaving money on the table?” Rick’s short tutorial will illustrate dynamic demand principles that achieve optimal revenue. You’ll see a demand diagnostic analysis that tells you whether admission prices are too low, too high or right on the money.

from GrantStation Insider

Jazz Performances Supported
Chamber Music America: Presenting Jazz
The mission of Chamber Music America (CMA) is to develop and strengthen an evolving chamber music community. CMA’s Presenting Jazz initiative provides support to U.S. presenters for public jazz ensemble performances taking place between January 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013. Priority will be given to presentations of adventurous music that signify new directions for the presenter. Grants of $5,000 to $12,000 are available to presenters throughout the country. The application deadline is October 14, 2011. Visit the CMA website to download the application guidelines and forms.
Funds for Modern Art Initiatives
The Dedalus Foundation: Institutional Grants Program
The Dedalus Foundation was founded to foster the public understanding of modern art and Modernism. The Foundation’s Institutional Grants Program supports educational programs, exhibitions, and publications by museums, universities, art schools, and other educational institutions throughout the United States that focus on modern art. Grants of up to $25,000 are provided for short term projects as well as for seed money to facilitate long-term projects that are in their initial or planning stage. Letters of introduction may be submitted throughout the year; the upcoming deadline for invited proposals is October 17, 2011. Visit the Foundation’s website to learn more about the Institutional Grants Program.
Community Programs in U.S. and Canada Funded
Costco Wholesale Corporate Contributions Program
The Costco Wholesale Corporate Contributions Program supports nonprofit organizations in company operating communities throughout the U.S. and Canada as well as international locations. Grants and product donations are provided to nonprofit organizations and educational institutions that address the areas of children’s issues, education, and health and human services. Local organizations should submit requests to the Warehouse Manager at the nearest Costco. Grant or donation requests which impact a broader region should go through the appropriate regional office. Requests may be submitted throughout the year. Visit the company’s website to review the donation and grant eligibility guidelines.
Guide for Implementing a Strategic Plan
The Bridgespan Group has published a guide to help nonprofits implement their strategic plans. Living Into Your Strategic Plan: A Guide to Implementation That Gets Results is designed to share Bridgespan clients’ experiences as well as insights from other nonprofits that have excelled at moving from strategic planning to implementation. These nonprofits have used practical approaches to convert their visions into tangible actions, and have been diligent about monitoring progress and correcting course when circumstances change. This guide presents their methods for implementation, with templates that illustrate the types of tools these nonprofit leaders used to lead implementation within their organizations.
State Legislator Demographics
The National Conference of State Legislatures has a new interactive map that shows the demographic makeup of legislators in each state. The map gives details about each state legislature’s ethnicity, gender, age, religion, occupation, education and party composition. National totals are available for each demographic.
Nonprofit Online News: http://news.gilbert.org/
+ Hiring and Working With an Evaluator
   The Juvenile Justice Evaluation Center has published a nice little guide to Hiring and Working With an Evaluator (17 page PDF). They cover all the key elements: selecting an evaluator, developing an evaluation plan (frequently overlooked), specifying…
   Read the rest of this post:
   Straight to the article:
JOB OPENING
Curator of Education
Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art
Great Falls, MT
Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art is inviting applications from qualified individuals to serve as Curator for the Museum’s education program.  Qualifications include a BA in Art, Art Education or related field with three years of related experience, demonstrated teaching ability, an understanding of contemporary art, and the ability to communicate related concepts, theories and practices to audiences of all ages and abilities. Must demonstrate initiative and be able to adapt successfully to multiple tasks and projects.  This is a full-time position with benefits.  For a full job description and position announcement, please contact the museum at 406-727-8255 or email info@the-square.org.  Information also is available on the museum’s website at http://www.the-square.org/.  Applications will be accepted through September 30.

Arts Organizations 9-14-2011