Borders has filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy: Will bookstores go the way of record stores?

With 200 stores closing and a loss of tens of thousands of jobs, is there a seed of hope for positive changes in the book-selling and buying markets that can keep doors open? Will the fate of bookstores be similar to what happened to record stores? Do you remember vinyl record albums in 33-1/3rd, 45 and the older 78 r.p.m.s [which stands for: revolutions per minute, for those of you born after 1980], Cassettes, 8-Tracks, Reel-to-Reel and even their predecessors?

Nathan Bransford, in his literary blog, reported this week that if we were to compare books to records, we might learn a few things about the future of bookstores. The central themes of his notions, on the few business successes the music store industry has seen, as I read them, concern: knowing your customers, their buying habits, and what they want to learn about their favorite genres, and what they might learn from you and your knowledgeable staff. These tenets sound a great deal like good customer service, and the broaden, deepen and diversify strategies that the Montana Arts Council continually emphasizes. Getting to know your audience, their preferences, and needs, is comparable to knowing who your customers are, and what books and music they are willing to pay for when money is tight, and for competing with the new online markets, and for when there are alternatives to cloth-bound and paperback books.

Bransford suggests there are three basic models of record stores that have survived, and these might be comparable to what may happen with bookstores. Type One is the kind of place that specializes in the talented musicians and composers of every decade, and makes it easy to “. . . find some gems you didn’t know you were looking for.” Type Two is the type of record store that buys used music, trades and resells large volumes of what’s still hot by targeting their customers needs and wants. Type Three offers a great deal of popular music, and in fact “sells 33% of the music sold in this country.” These are the big box stores such as Costco, Target and Wal-Mart, who bring their customers in with discounts on everything from diapers to live goldfish.

Bransford also offers the good news that “Vinyl record sales are at their highest since 1991,” and he offers his readers some interesting insights about why this is. In the years, between then and now, hundreds and even thousands of record stores have closed. It is worrisome that books seem be under siege in these tough economic times and with technology moving so fast that this middle-age woman, who has been working with books since the fifth grade, can’t keep up with the changes. With the big retailer Borders filing for bankruptcy and their attempts to re-organize under Chapter 11, is it possible that more bookstores will follow suit? What does the future of book-selling and buying and reading look like? I, for one, am not ready to give up my musty-room and narrow-aisle musings in some favorite independent bookseller haunt in Everytown, USA. Although, I have been known to peruse the mountain-high piles at the large retailer, or the cyber-shelves online, I don’t own a Kindle or any of their relatives, and though I may like to give one a try, I’m not ready for a steady diet of electronic page turning.

for more from Bransford, please see:
http://blog.nathanbransford.com/2011/02/do-record-stores-point-way-of-future.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NathanBransford+%28Nathan+Bransford+-+Blog%29

for more on Borders, please the February 16th, 2011 New York Times article:
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/02/16/borders-files-for-bankruptcy/

for more a bit more on electronic devices, please see the EHow article:
http://www.ehow.com/how_6573270_compare-wireless-reading-devices.html

Nathan Bransford is the author of JACOB WONDERBAR AND THE COSMIC SPACE KAPOW, a middle grade novel about three kids who blast off into space, break the universe, and have to find their way back home, which will be published by Dial Books for Young Readers in May 2011. He was a literary agent with Curtis Brown Ltd. from 2002 to 2010, but is now a publishing civilian working in the tech industry. He lives in San Francisco with his wife Alison Presley.

Borders has filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy: Will bookstores go the way of record stores?

Arts Educators 2-23-2011

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information on Art21 Educators professional development initiative, HABLA biannual International Form and two videos from Art21.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Art21 invites educators to apply for the third year of Art21 Educators, an intensive, one-year-long professional development initiative and learning community. The program is designed to support K-12 teachers of visual arts, language arts, humanities, social studies, and media who are interested in bringing contemporary art, artists, and themes into their classrooms.

For the 2011-2012 year, the program will expand its focus to discover new ways that contemporary art can support teaching and learning both in the arts and when the arts are combined with other disciplines such as language arts, social studies, and history.

Why become an Art21 Educator? Because:

·        You love contemporary art and Art21.
·        You want to meet and work with other educators who love contemporary art and Art21.
·        You believe contemporary art can expand the possibilities of teaching and learning across disciplines.
Applications must be received in the Art21 office by Friday, March 11, 2011. Notifications will be sent to applicants by Monday, April 18, 2011.

Visit our site
for more information about the program, to download an application form, and to read the program FAQs.
HABLA Biannual International Forum, April 1-2, 2011

HABLA: The Center for Language and Culture is both a cross-cultural language school focusing on the arts and literature, and an international education center where artists, teachers, and educational leaders gather across the Americas to exchange ideas and best practices in literacy, language, and the arts.

Held every two years in Mérida, México, the Habla international forum is a collaborative space for educators, organizational leaders, and artists to investigate a central concept through dialogue, presentations, and workshops. At the forum participants deepen their thinking about the field of education outside the traditional limits of institutions, bureaucracies, and borders.

The Beauty of Failure: Experimentation and Risk in Education
The Habla Forum
April 1-2, 2011
Merida, Mexico

http://ccsso.us1.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=3222734d2cafa7abd15e2c1b2&id=ba1da79f5a&e=fa55d9595e

Art21 News
New Videos: William Kentridge and Hiroshi Sugimoto
William Kentridge: The Magic FluteExclusive Episode #134: In his 2005 production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute (1791), artist William Kentridge reframes the opera’s original themes of Enlightenment philosophy through the bitter legacy of colonialism. “The most toxic combination in the world is . . . the certainty of being right and a monopoly of power,” says the artist, who casts the character of Sarastro in the role of a colonial overlord, “a benevolent figure that hides a monster.”
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Cabinet of CuriositiesExclusive Episode #135: Filmed in his New York studio, artist Hiroshi Sugimoto gives a tour of his private cabinet of curiosities, which includes meteorites, Stone Age tools, and whimsical toys.
Arts Educators 2-23-2011

Arts Organizations 2-23-2011

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on nominations for the National Medal of Arts, two items from the Artful Manager blog, and two articles from Board Café: Strategic Planning: Failures and Alternatives and Firing the Executive Director.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Nominations Open for the National Medal of Arts
Nominations are being accepted for the National Medal of Arts, the highest award given to artists and arts patrons by the U.S. government. Past honorees in the fields of visual, performing and literary arts include Aaron Copland, Ralph Ellison, Jessye Norman, Georgia O’Keeffe, the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation and Ray Charles. The award is presented by the president in a White House ceremony. Any member of the public may submit a nomination on-line. The deadline for 2011 nominations is March 11. For more information, contact the National Endowment for the Arts Office of the Chief of Staff at 202-682-5434.
THE ARTFUL MANAGER a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
RETHINKING RISK AT A MUSIC FESTIVAL…
The Spring for Music orchestral music festival scheduled to launch this May at Carnegie Hall has a range of bold goals. But I’m particularly intrigued by the economic strategies they’re taking to approach those goals. Yes, I’m an arts business nerd…
Posted: Thursday, February 10, 2011
MERIT VS. MATH…
David Brooks offers some useful insights on the public spending debates now raging at every level of government. Brooks suggests that those defending the programs up for cuts misunderstand the problem.
It’s not about the value and impact of their programs, it’s about the math.
Posted: Thursday, February 17, 2011

Strategic Planning: Failures and Alternatives

Here is Part 1 of a two-article series on strategic planning and alternatives to strategic planning.
Strategic planning swept into the nonprofit sector in the mid 1980s. Nonprofits were becoming seriously interested in management techniques, and strategic planning — along with meeting facilitation and fundraising training — was a focal point for that interest. Twenty years later, today no organization would dare say it doesn’t have a strategic plan.
As the recession deepens, many nonprofits now have strategic plans that they can’t move forward on. Those plans aren’t helping them figure out what to do instead.
And even before the economic crisis, there has been widespread grumbling about strategic planning. Too often dozens of meetings fail to produce new insights. To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/content/strategic-planning-failures-and-alternatives

Firing the Executive Director

Boards of directors tend to fall into one extreme or another when it comes to dissatisfaction with the executive director. Some boards let their dissatisfaction simmer for years without resolution. Other boards are too hasty and fire an executive at the drop of a hat or, more often, abruptly conclude a long period of silent dissatisfaction with a sudden termination. Sometimes just knowing more about how boards fire their EDs can help you relax into working more proactively with yours.
Sometimes it’s necessary for a board to fire the executive director. In instances of embezzlement or unethical behavior, the need to terminate is clear to everyone. More often it’s a little fuzzier — board members may get indications over time that the ED is either not doing her job or causing problems for the organization, but when to fire is not clear cut. So when and how do you do it? To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/node/613

Arts Organizations 2-23-2011

Artists 2-23-2011

Artists,
Below you will find two items of general interest and one opportunity for each performing arts and visual arts.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Nominations Open for the National Medal of Arts
Nominations are being accepted for the National Medal of Arts, the highest award given to artists and arts patrons by the U.S. government. Past honorees in the fields of visual, performing and literary arts include Aaron Copland, Ralph Ellison, Jessye Norman, Georgia O’Keeffe, the Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation and Ray Charles. The award is presented by the president in a White House ceremony. Any member of the public may submit a nomination on-line. The deadline for 2011 nominations is March 11. For more information, contact the National Endowment for the Arts Office of the Chief of Staff at 202-682-5434.
Art21 News
New Videos: William Kentridge and Hiroshi Sugimoto
William Kentridge: The Magic FluteExclusive Episode #134: In his 2005 production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute (1791), artist William Kentridge reframes the opera’s original themes of Enlightenment philosophy through the bitter legacy of colonialism. “The most toxic combination in the world is . . . the certainty of being right and a monopoly of power,” says the artist, who casts the character of Sarastro in the role of a colonial overlord, “a benevolent figure that hides a monster.”
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Cabinet of CuriositiesExclusive Episode #135: Filmed in his New York studio, artist Hiroshi Sugimoto gives a tour of his private cabinet of curiosities, which includes meteorites, Stone Age tools, and whimsical toys.
PERFORMING ARTS
Western Arts Alliance (WAA) is now accepting applications from performing artists, companies, or their agents for its 2011 Juried Showcase Program.  The showcase, part of 2011 WAA Annual Conference in Seattle, WA, will take place on August 31 at the Broadway Performance Hall.  The Juried Showcase gives presenters and delegates the opportunity to see a diverse range of performance of outstanding quality in a short program.  Juried Showcasing artists are selected in a competitive process by a committee of WAA members, and their performances take place as part of the core conference program.
The application fee is $65; you need not be a member of WAA at the time of application, but all showcasing artists must be members (or represented by a member) exhibiting at the conference.  The application form and full details may be found at http://www.westarts.org/pdf/conf/2011_WAA_Juried_Showcase_Application.pdfAll materials must be received in the WAA Office by Friday, March 25, 2011.
See the attached PDF for complete information.
VISUAL ARTS
Seattle seeks artist to develop artwork for west Queen Anne fire station
Selected artist or artist team to create site-specific artwork for new Fire Station 20
SEATTLE —The Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the Department of Finance and Administrative Services (DFAS) and the Seattle Fire Department (SFD), seeks an artist or artist team to develop artwork for the new Fire Station 20 in Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood.
The selected artist/artist team will work with the community, firefighters and city of Seattle staff to develop the artwork. The artist will create artwork that will be either integrated into the fire station facility or a site-specific, durable, three-dimensional, free-standing artwork next to the building. The artwork should address the work and spirit of the firefighters and the unique character of the surrounding neighborhood.
The opportunity is open to established professional artists living in the Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana) or California. The application deadline is 11 p.m., Friday, March 25. The selected artist will receive a commission of $90,000, all-inclusive to design, fabricate and install artwork. A link to the online application and guidelines is available at www.seattle.gov/arts.
The current Fire Station 20 located at 3205 13th Ave W. is too small, at 2,860 square feet, to accommodate the operations required to support modern emergency response. The station is also in poor condition due to its age and type of construction. The new fire station will be located at a site between 2800 and 2816 15th Ave. W. on the west side of Queen Anne in the Interbay area. Schematic design is expected to begin in June 2011, with construction anticipated to begin in 2012. Fire Department operations will move to the new location in 2013. Once the new Fire Station 20 is completed and occupied, the old station will be sold and the proceeds placed back into the Fire Levy program.
The new Fire Station 20 is funded by the Fire Facilities and Emergency Response Levy passed by Seattle voters in 2003. Over a nine-year period this program, which started in 2004, will use $197 million in levy proceeds and other funding to upgrade, renovate or replace 32 neighborhood fire stations. The Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs, with DFAS and SFD, developed an art program to commission artworks that address the intersection of firefighters and the community and to form a distinct body of new artworks for the city’s public art collection. Since the passage of the levy, the city has commissioned 11 artists to develop artworks for 10 neighborhood fire stations. Over the next two years, the city will commission artists for two upcoming station projects.
Find more information about the Fire Facilities and Emergency Response Levy and Fire Station 20 at www.seattle.gov/fleetsfacilities/firelevy/.

Artists 2-23-2011

Nominations for the 2011-2013 Montana Poet Laureate Are Open

For Immediate Release
Contact: Kim Baraby Hurtle, Montana Arts Council
khurtle@mt.gov
(406) 444-6639

MONTANA POET LAUREATE NOMINATION FORMS NOW AVAILABLE

The Montana Poet Laureate is a position created by the Montana legislature, which recognizes and honors a citizen poet of exceptional talent and accomplishment. Applications for the state’s next Poet Laureate are due Friday, April 29, 2011 at 5 p.m.

In 2005, Sandra Alcosser became our first Montana Poet Laureate and served for two years. Greg Pape was selected as the second Poet Laureate in 2007 and he served through the summer of 2009. Henry Real Bird was selected in 2009 and will serve into the summer of 2011.

The Montana Arts Council encourages nominations of poets from all walks of life, and all poetry forms are welcome. Montanans may nominate a poet for the Poet Laureate position, or learn more about eligibility requirements, the application process and the Poet Laureate program at: http://art.mt.gov/resources/resources_plposition.asp

The term of service for the position is for two years and the award is honorific. The Montana Arts Council will convene a panel of poets and literary experts, among others, to select three finalists from among the nominations. These names will be submitted to the Montana Arts Council for approval and finalization. The Poet Laureate of Montana will then be chosen by Governor Schweitzer from among these nominees in the summer of 2011.

The Poet Laureate will be chosen on the basis of three criteria:
•Excellence as evidenced by the submitted poetry samples.
•Exemplary professionalism as evidenced by an established history of substantial and significant publication and special honors, awards, fellowships, or other recognition.
• Advancement of poetry in Montana communities.

For further information, please call or email Kim Baraby Hurtle: (406) 444-6639, khurtle@mt.gov.

Nominations for the 2011-2013 Montana Poet Laureate Are Open

Arts in Healthcare and Healing

CCC Workshop Participant with her mask Dec. 2010

Cancer, Courage & Creativity:
an eight-week workshop in Missoula

  • When: March 3,10, 17,24, 31 and
    April 7, 21, 28, 2011
    Thursdays, 5:30 – 7:30pm
  • Cost: No Charge,
    Donations appreciated.
  • Who: For people who have
    or have had cancer.
  • Where: Living Art Studio
    The Warehouse Mall
    725 W. Alder, Ste. #17

Using the arts and nature to support healing since 1993

Call to Register by March 2 , 2011

406-549-5329
Youpa Stein, Director of Living Art of Montana
ysteinprograms@livingartofmontana.org
http://www.livingartofmontana.org/

“The Living Art workshop made me
realize I have more choices about how
to face illness and heal and live with
hope. I am not alone on this journey.”

Arts in Healthcare and Healing

A nice article from the archives…..

Nonprofit Online News:

+ 5 Tips for Creating Non-Profit Online Communities

I am pleased to see that, more and more, listening is becoming a critical early step and key ongoing practice in recommended communication strategies of all kinds. As little as a year or two ago, it was more of an off-handed acknowledgement, quickly passed over in favor of discussions of tools and how to turn social media into broadcast media. Geoff Livingston’s 5 Tips for Creating Non-Profit Online Communities is a great example of this new strategic commitment. He gets it right from the start with tip #1: The Cause is the Purpose. Too often nonprofits will make the organization itself the purpose. Big mistake. Tip #2 is listening and he explicitly identifies the need for ongoing systems for paying attention to stakeholders. Read on for more detail about these two, along with his other three tips. This is inspiring stuff.

http://news.gilbert.org/clickThru/redir/7218/5286/rms

Quotes from article – Beck:

The cause is the purpose of the network. Don’t build a network for your organization’s website. The mission of the site needs to revolve around the general common bond a non-profit has with its stakeholder community.

The classic community mistake is to use a network to drive information out into the public as opposed to creating a compelling experience for members. Sometimes that means getting out of the way. Providing value includes a dynamic environment where members interact and drive conversation, participate in activity they can’t find on general social networks, and receive acknowledgment.

“A social network needs to deliver value. I don’t think that you should be sending the members links to your research and reports 5 times a day,” said Holly Ross, Executive Director, NTEN: The Nonprofit Technology Network. “A theater company may be able to serve its patrons by providing a social space for the patrons to discuss play writing, set design, and/or the latest shows from the company. A health organization may serve its clients by giving them a space to talk to and support one another privately.”

A nice article from the archives…..