2010 Do Lectures

You all know I have a secret little crush on this man.  The lecture is a bit long but worth it.
Start where you are… not where you should be.
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2010 Do Lectures

Arts Organizations 11-17-2010

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on our new Report on the Status of Arts Education in Montana, Preserve American Community Planning Projects Request for Proposals; Six Easy, Nearly-Free ways to be more Disabled-Accessible; three items from the Artful Manager blog; Board Café: What is Micromanagement and What Isn’t?; A new report, National Arts Advocacy Campaigns: Overview of Case Studies and Good Practice; Emma’s Disability is Hurting Performance: Can We Fire Her?; Random Acts of Culture Surprise People in Eight Communities and three job openings – one at University of Idaho.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/

A Report on the Status of Arts Education in Montana: 2009-2010 School Year

The Montana Arts Council (MAC) initiated the survey to help establish important and missing baseline information in the area of arts education in Montana. This report summarizes the status of arts education in Montana using data collected from 313 of Montana’s 847 elementary, middle and secondary schools statewide. This information was formed from responses by principals, superintendents and head teachers – it is their perception of the state of arts education in their schools.
Questions throughout the survey were designed to quantify and evaluate each school’s situation in offering the arts as a core subject. 27% of the schools reported that they have a multi-year partnership or collaboration with artists or arts organizations to help meet the school’s arts education goals. Many of your organizations are listed on page 31 of the study. On MAC’s website you can download the Executive Summary and the full report. http://art.mt.gov/schools/schools_survey.asp
I would be interested in your thoughts after reading the report and any next steps you think the arts council should take with this information. – Beck
Request for Proposals – Preserve America Community Planning Projects
Montana Community Revitalization Project: Heritage Planning for the New Decade
The State Historic Preservation Office has received funding through Preserve America to subgrant funds for community planning projects promoting economic development through heritage tourism and historic preservation.  These subgrants are available to designated Preserve America communities, Tribal Historic Preservation Offices, or communities in the process of applying for Preserve America status. 
Two funding sources are available:
1)     Promotion of economic development through heritage tourism and historic preservation; and
2)     Development of downtown planning and capacity building through the Montana Department of Commerce’s Main Street program.
Applications must be postmarked by December 17, 2010.
If your project involves Main Street, please contact Julie Burk, Main Street Program Coordinator, regarding funding availability and the application process for these projects.  Her phone number and e-mail address are:  (406)-841-2756, jburk@mt.gov  
See attached PA Subgrant Announcement.doc, 10PAIVGrantAppInstructions.doc and 2010PAIVapp.doc for more information.

Six Easy, Nearly-Free Ways to Be More Disabled-Accessible

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations are undeniably intimidating and seem so expensive to implement, but disabilities activist Mary Lester says there are simple ways to make your office and program sites more accessible without busting the bank. Mary offers the following six easy and affordable ways to dramatically improve your accessibility for people with disabilities. Four for visitors and two for staff:
For clients, patrons, visitors
1. Put up signs, darn it! So many nonprofits have an entrance somewhere that’s wheelchair accessible, even if their front door isn’t. But there isn’t a sign on the front door that tells visitors to “Go around to the left side of the building for a wheelchair accessible door” or “Press this bell for assistance with the door.”
And because we feel this is so important, if you don’t have time to go to the link copy the attached PDF and read it later. Beck
THE ARTFUL MANAGER | WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
THE MAGIC AND CHALLENGE OF ‘SUNK COSTS’…
There’s a magical truth about many arts and culture projects that makes seemingly impossible decisions a whole lot easier: If you’ve spent time, money, and energy on something, and can’t get any of those things back, it’s a ‘sunk cost’. And sunk costs are best ignored in determining what comes next.
Posted: Monday, November  8, 2010
HOW OUR BRAINS BUILD OUR BIOGRAPHIES…
Big Think shares some interesting and useful thoughts from behavioral neurobiologist Antonio Damasio on how our brains build stories — particularly the stories of our own lives.
Posted: Thursday, November 11, 2010
EVERYTHING OLD IS…STILL OLD, ACTUALLY…
A decades-old article from Time magazine leads a group of symphony experts to wonder why they keep talking about the same crisis over and over again.
Posted: Friday, November 12, 2010

What is Micromanagement and What Isn’t?

Micromanagement: whatever the board is doing that the executive director doesn’t like.  🙂
From an executive director: “The board is micromanaging! They’re driving me crazy!”
And from a board member of the same organization: “Every time we make even a suggestion the executive director flies off the handle and accuses us of micromanaging! Aren’t we supposed to be guiding and leading?”
Wryly, we might say that “micromanagement” is whatever the board does that the executive director doesn’t like. For example, let’s imagine a board reviewing a budget that has $10,000 included for lighting fixtures. Some board members don’t see the point for new fixtures at all, . . .
Keep Arts In Schools [info@keepartsinschools.org]

Promoting the Value of Arts Education

A new report, National Arts Advocacy Campaigns: Overview of Case Studies and Good Practice, was released by the International Federation of Arts Councils and Culture Agencies (IFACCA). Based on research and responses to a survey distributed in August 2009 to the IFACCA network, the report examined a range of lobbying, advertising and grassroots arts advocacy campaigns that national arts funding agencies have undertaken over the past decade. The report also explores which strategies raised awareness of the arts and which backfired.
The report is full of useful information, including the finding that a more effective way to appeal to parents is to use specific phrases such as “your kids” or “your children” rather than the generic “kids” or “children.” Other information – such as finding that many find the term “the arts” vague and confusing – present new challenges for arts advocates as we consider our work for the next year.  

Emma’s Disability is Hurting Performance: Can We Fire Her?

Dear Rita:
Emma has worked as a case manager for our nonprofit for over 15 years. Lately, she has outbursts with clients and coworkers and she’s way behind on her paperwork. We designed a Performance Improvement Plan. A couple of weeks later she informed us that she has migraine headaches and depression since her mother died. She gave us a doctor’s note stating that she needed to transfer to a less stressful job, in essence a request for an accommodation. Fortunately, we had an administrative assistant position vacant and we were able to accommodate her request. Emma’s performance in that job was less than satisfactory and she took a 3-month leave of absence under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). At the expiration of her FMLA leave, Emma returned to her old case management job. During her absence, all case manager jobs were restructured and Emma now has to travel further to visit clients and fill out additional paperwork. She is missing a lot of work time, stating that her migraine headaches have become worse and that she never knows when they will flare up. Emma has exhausted her FMLA leave and there is no other vacant position to transfer her into. Are migraines a disability? We want to fire her for poor attendance . . . but can we do that? — Pulling My Hair Out!
Dear “Hairless,” To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/node/584

Random Acts of Culture Surprise People in Eight Communities

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is rethinking cultural classics this season as it kicks of its new initiative, Random Acts of Culture (RAC). It’s bringing short, spontaneous bursts of classical music, theater, dance and opera to the streets in its eight operating communities: Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Philadelphia, San Jose, St. Paul and Miami. Think Mozart at the mall and La Traviata in the market. Knight Arts, the arts and culture program of the Knight Foundation, is planning to do 1,000 RACs in the next three years. The first occurred May 14, 2010 in Miami and the most recent—the largest to date—occurred Saturday, October 30, 2010–when 650 singers surprised shoppers at a Philadelphia Macy’s department store by bursting into Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus. For videos and feedback of all RACs that have taken place so far, check out http://ccsso.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=3222734d2cafa7abd15e2c1b2&id=b4e1d088a2&e=fa55d9595e. Be on the lookout, and have your cell phones ready!

JOB OPENINGS
Director of Development and Marketing-Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival
(Director of Development and Marketing)
Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival
University of Idaho
Open for Recruitment:  November 1, 2010 – November 29, 2010
Announcement #:  16914001480
Salary Range:  $44,200 – $60,000
Full or Part Time: Full Time
Location: Moscow, Idaho
This position is contingent upon the continuation of work and/or funding.
Materials Required:
Online Application (http://apptrkr.com/165869)
Job References
Letter of Qualification
Resume
Manager, Corporate Relations
Roundabout Theatre Company
New York, New York
Development Coordinator
Los Angeles Philharmonic Association
Los Angeles, California

Arts Organizations 11-17-2010

Arts Educators 11-17-2010

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information on our Report on the Status of Arts Education in Montana; two articles from Education Week: Schools Integrate Dance into Core Academics and Momentum Builds to Restructure Teacher Education; 2010 Virginia B. Ball Creative Writing Competition; A new report, National Arts Advocacy Campaigns: Overview of Case Studies and Good Practice; Art21 resources for teachers and two new videos and Random Acts of Culture Surprise People in Eight Communities
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/

A Report on the Status of Arts Education in Montana: 2009-2010 School Year

The Montana Arts Council (MAC) initiated the survey to help establish important and missing baseline information in the area of arts education in Montana. This report summarizes the status of arts education in Montana using data collected from 313 of Montana’s 847 elementary, middle and secondary schools statewide. This information was formed from responses by principals, superintendents and head teachers – it is their perception of the state of arts education in their schools.
Questions throughout the survey were designed to quantify and evaluate each school’s situation in offering the arts as a core subject. On MAC’s website you can download the Executive Summary and the full report. http://art.mt.gov/schools/schools_survey.asp
I would be interested in your thoughts after reading the report and any next steps you think the arts council should take with this information. – Beck
Today’s issue of Education Week has two articles that are of interest to those of us who teach the arts.
FOCUS ON: THE ARTS
Schools Integrate Dance Into Core Academics
The Infusion of the Arts Appears to be Gaining a Stronger Foothold at a Time When Advocates Are Struggling to Ensure Time and Support for Their Disciplines

Momentum Builds to Restructure Teacher Education

Now, a report commissioned by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, released yesterday, adds the voices of a diverse array of stakeholders, including representatives from the traditional university-based programs that prepare the majority of the nation’s teachers.
The report’s main recommendation: Supervised, structured work of teacher-candidates in diverse classroom settings must be the foremost component of preservice teacher training, with other aspects like coursework embedded in that training. It draws heavily on the teacher-residency model and a handful of university-based education programs that take such an approach to training new teachers. To read more: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2010/11/17/13teacherprep.h30.html
We are now one month away from the deadline for the 2010 Virginia B. Ball Creative Writing Competition! There is still plenty of time to urge the talented young writers you know to apply online by December 15. The winner of the competition will be offered a $30,000 scholarship to the creative writing program at Interlochen Arts Academy, and will have the truly remarkable opportunity to join a vibrant community of dedicated young artists and writers. Click here to learn more about the creative writing program at the Academy.

Complete contest details, submission guidelines and entry form are available online. For a print-friendly PDF contest flyer, click here.
First Prize: $30,000 scholarship to Interlochen Arts Academy. Contest winners may apply for additional need-based financial aid.
Eligibility: the contest is open to students who are currently enrolled in grades 8-11 during the 2010-11 academic year.
Deadline: midnight on December 15, 2010

Keep Arts In Schools [info@keepartsinschools.org]

Promoting the Value of Arts Education

A new report, National Arts Advocacy Campaigns: Overview of Case Studies and Good Practice, was released by the International Federation of Arts Councils and Culture Agencies (IFACCA). Based on research and responses to a survey distributed in August 2009 to the IFACCA network, the report examined a range of lobbying, advertising and grassroots arts advocacy campaigns that national arts funding agencies have undertaken over the past decade. The report also explores which strategies raised awareness of the arts and which backfired.
The report is full of useful information, including the finding that a more effective way to appeal to parents is to use specific phrases such as “your kids” or “your children” rather than the generic “kids” or “children.” Other information – such as finding that many find the term “the arts” vague and confusing – present new challenges for arts advocates as we consider our work for the next year.  
Art21
 New William Kentridge Resources for Educators
In addition to the Educators’ Guide and Screening Companion for William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible film, two new Kentridge-related resources made their debut this month:

Case Studies written by educators for educators share experiences using William Kentridge’s work and the William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible film in the classroom.  Follow along as several teachers share periodic updates about projects currently being created with students.

On Theme looks at particular topics central to William Kentridge’s work and working process, combining short films, images, discussion prompts, and activity suggestions to use with students in and out of the classroom. This week the topic is “Play and Process.”

Each week, for the next three weeks, we’ll be releasing additional Case Studies and Themes so check back and share with colleagues!

 New Videos: William Kentridge and Paul McCarthy
William Kentridge: Studio Manager Anne McIlleronEpisode #126: Anne McIlleron, William Kentridge’s studio manager, discusses the artist’s working method and penchant for collaboration. Featuring behind-the-scenes moments from the artist’s studio in Johannesburg, South Africa; a performance of I am not me, the horse is not mine (2008) at the 16th Biennale of Sydney, Australia; and rehearsals for Kentridge’s production of The Nose (2010) at The Metropolitan Opera, New York.
William Kentridge: CollaborationEpisode #127: Three of William Kentridge’s long-time collaborators–Sabine Theunissen (Set Design), Catherine Meyburgh (Video Composite & Editing), and Kim Gunning (Video Control & Projection)–recount the creative process of mounting a production of The Nose (2010) at The Metropolitan Opera, New York.
Paul McCarthy: Black & White TapesEpisode #128: Interviewed in his Los Angeles studio, Paul McCarthy discusses the genesis of his Black and White Tapes (1970-75), a suite of 13 videos begun while he was a student at the University of Southern California (USC). Also featuring excerpts from the video Ma Bell (1971) and works in the exhibition Central Symmetrical Rotation Movement–Three Installations, Two Films (2008) at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.


Random Acts of Culture Surprise People in Eight Communities

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is rethinking cultural classics this season as it kicks of its new initiative, Random Acts of Culture (RAC). It’s bringing short, spontaneous bursts of classical music, theater, dance and opera to the streets in its eight operating communities: Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Philadelphia, San Jose, St. Paul and Miami. Think Mozart at the mall and La Traviata in the market. Knight Arts, the arts and culture program of the Knight Foundation, is planning to do 1,000 RACs in the next three years. The first occurred May 14, 2010 in Miami and the most recent—the largest to date—occurred Saturday, October 30, 2010–when 650 singers surprised shoppers at a Philadelphia Macy’s department store by bursting into Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus. For videos and feedback of all RACs that have taken place so far, check out http://ccsso.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=3222734d2cafa7abd15e2c1b2&id=b4e1d088a2&e=fa55d9595e. Be on the lookout, and have your cell phones ready!

Arts Educators 11-17-2010

Artists 11-17-2010

Artists,
Below you will find an opportunity from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission for artists in several categories, new videos from Art21 and the Knight Foundation’s Random Acts of Culture.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Please forward this funding opportunity to any and all professional creative artists on your email lists.  Eligible applicants are architects, choreographers, composers, creative writers, designers, media artists, playwrights, visual artists, or solo theater artists who work with original material (including puppeteers, storytellers and performance artists). Multidisciplinary artists and artistic directors of theater or dance companies are also eligible.
FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR CREATIVE ARTISTS – DEADLINE: February 1, 2011

The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission works cooperatively with the National Endowment for the Arts to sponsor The U.S/Japan Creative Artists’ Program.  The program provides support for up to five outstanding contemporary and traditional artists from the United States to spend a three-month residency in Japan to pursue their individual artistic goals.  The next deadline for this program is February 1, 2011.

The U.S/Japan Creative Artists’ Program is extremely competitive; applicants should have regional or national recognition and anticipate a highly rigorous review of their work.  Artists should also present compelling reasons for wanting to work in Japan.

Selected artists will receive:
●       A monthly stipend for living expenses and a housing supplement, as well as an allowance for professional support services
●       Up to $6,000 for round trip transportation for the artist, domestic partner and/or dependent children, and a baggage/storage allowance
●       A stipend for pre-departure Japanese language study in the United States

Guidelines and the application, can be found at http://www.jusfc.gov/creativeartists.asp.

 New Videos: William Kentridge and Paul McCarthy
William Kentridge: Studio Manager Anne McIlleronEpisode #126: Anne McIlleron, William Kentridge’s studio manager, discusses the artist’s working method and penchant for collaboration. Featuring behind-the-scenes moments from the artist’s studio in Johannesburg, South Africa; a performance of I am not me, the horse is not mine (2008) at the 16th Biennale of Sydney, Australia; and rehearsals for Kentridge’s production of The Nose (2010) at The Metropolitan Opera, New York.
William Kentridge: CollaborationEpisode #127: Three of William Kentridge’s long-time collaborators–Sabine Theunissen (Set Design), Catherine Meyburgh (Video Composite & Editing), and Kim Gunning (Video Control & Projection)–recount the creative process of mounting a production of The Nose (2010) at The Metropolitan Opera, New York.
Paul McCarthy: Black & White TapesEpisode #128: Interviewed in his Los Angeles studio, Paul McCarthy discusses the genesis of his Black and White Tapes (1970-75), a suite of 13 videos begun while he was a student at the University of Southern California (USC). Also featuring excerpts from the video Ma Bell (1971) and works in the exhibition Central Symmetrical Rotation Movement–Three Installations, Two Films (2008) at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

Random Acts of Culture Surprise People in Eight Communities

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is rethinking cultural classics this season as it kicks of its new initiative, Random Acts of Culture (RAC). It’s bringing short, spontaneous bursts of classical music, theater, dance and opera to the streets in its eight operating communities: Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Philadelphia, San Jose, St. Paul and Miami. Think Mozart at the mall and La Traviata in the market. Knight Arts, the arts and culture program of the Knight Foundation, is planning to do 1,000 RACs in the next three years. The first occurred May 14, 2010 in Miami and the most recent—the largest to date—occurred Saturday, October 30, 2010–when 650 singers surprised shoppers at a Philadelphia Macy’s department store by bursting into Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus. For videos and feedback of all RACs that have taken place so far, check out http://ccsso.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=3222734d2cafa7abd15e2c1b2&id=b4e1d088a2&e=fa55d9595e. Be on the lookout, and have your cell phones ready!

Artists 11-17-2010

Disability.gov Accessibility Update: 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design Available to Online Viewers Nationwide

The Justice Department (DOJ) has made available online the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design. These standards were adopted as part of the revised regulations for Title II and Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. When the standards go into effect on March 15, 2012, they will set minimum requirements – both scoping and technical – for new construction and alterations of the facilities of more than 80,000 state and local governments and over seven million businesses. DOJ has also posted on the website important guidance about the standards compiled from material in the Title II and Title III regulations.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/civil_rights/accessibility_guidelines_%26_standards

Disability.gov Accessibility Update: 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design Available to Online Viewers Nationwide