Checking Back in Again with THE BIG READ

As a part of the Lewis & Clark Library’s, THE BIG READ Under the Big Sky, the twelve of us, from the Quarry Hill Book Club, met this past week for our group discussion on The Maltese Falcon. As promised, there were liverwurst sandwiches and coffee. It turned out that these sandwiches were from a crack o’dawn scene between Sam Spade and his pretty client Brigid O’Shaughnessy. It’s a scene, in Spade’s kitchen, where readers see a softer side of this hard-boiled private detective.

Gene Allen provided our group with a biographical background on the author, Dashiell Hammett, and some publishing history on his novels. As a avid book collector and reader, Gene offered some more food for thought, and showed us some original Dell paperback editions with their stunning artwork. A bit of a historical perspective was thrown into the discussion, and such events as the world at the brink of war, and mob activities in Chicago— including the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre—were considered. The book was published in 1929, by Alfred A. Knopf, but had also been serialized in The Black Mask, a popular magazine.

Hammett’s connections with Montana enlivened the conversation. The history museum curator among us brought up her reading of Red Harvest (1929). This is Hammett’s fictional story of a town reminiscent of Butte in the 1920’s. In real life, Hammett had worked as a detective for the Pinkerton’s, and he’d been sent to Butte to handle a few matters between union organizers and the mines. This discussion thread made me consider the possibility of looking into the bridges between fact and fiction, and how this could be another avenue of activity for any of us participating in THE BIG READ.

I wouldn’t say the group came to a consensus on the reasons this particular book had been chosen for 2010, or whether it was great literature. Some ideas included: it’s a short book; and for encouraging reading, among those who might be leery that reading could be as much fun as say: paintball, this is an action-packed novel; it’s a novel with enough plot twists, innuendo, and history mixed into framework of plot, character, and setting to satisfy a range of readers. I wouldn’t say that everyone enjoyed the book. My thoughts on the book changed as soon as Hammett rolled out the history of the statue for our consideration. Most agreed that Hammett crafted more than a few sentences with humor and insight, and one of our favorites was found on page 64: “His second wife didn’t look like the first, but they were more alike than they were different. You know, the kind of women that play fair games of golf and bridge and like new salad recipes.”

My conclusions about the book altered drastically in the last few pages. I will stick with my theory that Sam Spade is an anti-hero in a story where there isn’t much black and white, but instead multiple shades of gray and plenty of shadows. Look to the loyal secretary, Effie Perrine, and consider her feminine intuition. She’ll be the one with the look of surprise on her face at the end.

Julie Saylor, our fearless organizer, researched and found this site for discussion topics. http://www.wab.org/events/bigread07/discussion.shtml
It might be useful to your own gatherings.

I did look up about two dozen terms and slang words from The Maltese Falcon that had stumped me. I found references for most, and these definitions, along with their cultural context, broadened and deepened my understanding of the book, and the research made feel a bit like a detective, which only added to the experience of reading the novel. I did not, however, find a definition, or color swatch, for the word: Artoise – page 54: “She’d put on a satin gown of the blue shade called Artoise that season.” I await feedback from our readers . . . Oxford Dictionary owners? French-speaking readers, or costume history buffs?

For information about participating communities, featured books, and more, visit http://www.neabigread.org/ or e-mail thebigread@artsmidwest.org.

KBH

Checking Back in Again with THE BIG READ

Artists 10-5-2010

Artists,
Below is one item of interest – the Kennedy Center’s Inspirational Teacher Awards.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
The Kennedy Center/Stephen Sondheim Inspirational Teacher Awards

Created in honor of Stephen Sondheim’s 80th birthday through the generous support of Freddie and Myrna Gershon, the Inspirational Teacher Awards publicly recognize the contributions of specific teachers and reward them for their dedication and service. By spotlighting the extraordinary impact teachers have on the lives of their students, the Awards celebrate the teaching profession, the important role of teachers in society, and seek to inspire others to pursue this noble profession. Along with the Award, the selected teachers will be showcased on the Kennedy Center website and will receive $10,000 in appreciation for their inspiration in the field of teaching.

People from all over the United States can nominate a teacher who affected their lives and motivated them to great achievements. Nominees must be living, legal residents of the United States who currently teach or have taught in a K-12 school, college, or university in the United States. Teachers of all grade levels and subject areas are eligible. To nominate a teacher, you must be at least 18 years of age and must have been the Nominee’s student.

Nominations can be a written, audio, or video story and content and quality of the story are more important than the format you choose.

All required materials must be submitted online or postmarked by the deadline, Wednesday, December 15, 2010. For more information, official rules, and nomination information, please visit the website: http://ccsso.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=3222734d2cafa7abd15e2c1b2&id=d5b2f76a4b&e=fa55d9595e

Artists 10-5-2010

Arts Organizations 10-20-2010

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find an interview with co-chairs of President’s Committee (on the arts) and four items from the Artful Manager blog that I think you might be interested in.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Barry’s Blog
(“Well I think that we’re interested in the notion of the Artist’s Corps (along the lines of the Peace Corps); developing that concept, but doing the research that is necessary first, to analyze the need and the manner in which we can meet those needs to have more artists working, particularly in schools.”)
THE ARTFUL MANAGER | WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
POWER (THROUGH PLASTIC) TO THE PEOPLE
Anyone interested in sales for small arts organizations or independent artists should be watching Square, the device and service that turns your iPhone, iPad, or Android phone into a credit card processor. It makes a formerly cumbersome process brainlessly easy. And that changes the game.
Posted: Thursday, October 7, 2010
VIRTUAL AND VIRAL, NEW APPROACHES TO PUBLIC ART…
The Arts Management newsletter offers a fabulous overview of city and civic art initiatives currently underway around the world. Here are three particularly cool projects.
Posted: Monday, October 11, 2010
PRESERVATION V. PROTECTION…
Copyright law has always walked the tightrope between monopoly and community. A new report commissioned by the Library of Congress suggests that it’s officially gone too far in one particular direction. In essence, any organization or individual passionate about preserving recorded sound has to break the law to do so…including nonprofits.
Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010
COST AND CREATIVITY…
KCRW’s “The Business” radio show/podcast offers a great interview with film director Stephen Frears on his experiences in independent and major studio filmmaking. Frears shows refreshing self-awareness about how money, time, and risk shape his ability to do his preferred creative work.
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010

Arts Organizations 10-20-2010

Arts Educators 10-20-2010

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information on a survey for your thoughts and online teaching and evaluation materials from Big Thought, Art21’s latest film – shows Oct 24 4pm MT PBS, the online collections database at the Phillips Collection, an interview with co-chairs of President’s Committee (on the arts) and TransCultural Exchange Announces its 2011 Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Big Thought Launches Needs Assessment Survey for New Online Teaching and Evaluation Materials 

The Wallace Foundation is partnering with Big Thought, a Dallas, Texas based nonprofit, to provide cost-free, online access to Big Thought’s innovative yet practical work in assessing and improving the quality of teaching and learning. This virtual resource library and online training will provide cities, organizations and individuals with tools, materials and step-by-step guidance on how to develop a shared understanding of quality, assess current strengths and weaknesses in instruction, and use those insights to develop a plan to improve teaching and learning. These offerings synthesize the work of national education and arts-based learning experts with best practices observed over a four-year citywide initiative in Dallas. The resources are equally relevant to learning during both in and out-of-school time.

As the Big Thought project team develops these online materials, it would like to learn more about the needs and online preferences of those it seeks to serve. The project team would appreciate your assistance by completing a brief online survey. It should take between five and ten minutes to complete. The survey is available at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/AEP. It is open until October 22, 2010.

Broadcast Premiere on PBS This Week
Warm up your televisions and set your DVRs: Art21’s latest film, William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible, premieres on PBS this week. The national broadcast premiere is scheduled for October 21 at 10:00 p.m., though broadcast times vary by region (for example, the New York broadcast time is Wednesday, October 20, at 10:00 p.m.). Please remember to check your local listings to find out when the program will air on your local PBS station. (
Sunday, October 24  —  4:00pm MT PBS – Beck)
Screenings Across the Country
Preview screenings of William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible continue this week and throughout October at select venues across the country. Screening hosts represent a broad range of organizations and institutions. Visit the film site to find a preview screening near you.
MONTANA (Missoula Art Museum showed the film last weekend- Oct 16-17)
Helena, MT
Holter Museum of Art
12 E Lawrence, Helena, MT 59601
October 26th, 7 p.m.
Educators’ Guide and Screening Companion
A free 26-page educators’ guide and screening companion has been produced to accompany the film. The guide is designed for use in a wide range of cultural and educational institutions, and will be available for download from the film site later this week.
The Phillips Collection Receives IMLS Grant to Complete Digitization of Permanent Collection

The Phillips Collection has received a grant of $65,390 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to complete its online collections digitization project. The project involves photographing the museum’s permanent collection of impressionist and modern American and European art and producing high-resolution digital scans to be used on its website.

The online collections database project is part of a larger initiative to make the museum’s permanent collection and library holdings accessible to a worldwide audience. To date, the museum has digitized more than half of its collection.

Barry’s Blog
(“Well I think that we’re interested in the notion of the Artist’s Corps (along the lines of the Peace Corps); developing that concept, but doing the research that is necessary first, to analyze the need and the manner in which we can meet those needs to have more artists working, particularly in schools.”)
TransCultural Exchange Announces its 2011 Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts: The Interconnected World April 7 – April 10, 2011

Registration is now open for TransCultural Exchange’s 3rd biennial Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts: The Interconnected World. Don’t miss out on this rare opportunity to meet more than 70 speakers from around the world to learn about long- and short-term residencies, funding, exchange programs and other international platforms for launching your work. It all takes place April 7-10, 2011, when Boston is transformed into the hub of the global arts community.

http://www.transculturalexchange.org/conference_2011/overview.htm

The 2011 Conference will be TransCultural Exchange’s largest yet, offering time to hear, discuss and share your work at the more than 50 sessions, workshops, portfolio reviews, networking events, screenings, gallery receptions and new exhibitors’ hall.

Experience Boston’s cultural offerings with tours of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Boston Center for the Arts, MIT’s Art and Architecture Program and the Boston Public Library. Attend events, concerts, readings, exhibits and talks by leading artists, critics and researchers at such institutions as MIT, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Northeastern University and Boston University.

Be sure to register early to get the portfolio review of your choice; and don’t miss out on additional opportunities to participate as either an artist, writer, exhibitor, sponsor or academic institution.

Registration:
Early Registration is $275, due midnight EST, December 15, 2010.Registration is $345 after December 15, 2010; and $425 after April 1.
Student discount registration is $115, due midnight EST, December 15, 2010.
Applications for scholarships are due November 15, 2010.
About TransCultural Exchange:
TransCultural Exchange is a 501c3 non-profit organization, whose mission is to bridge cultural, geographic, political and linguistic divides by bringing people together through the arts in order to foster a greater understanding of world cultures.

Arts Educators 10-20-2010

Artists 10-20-2010

Artists,
Below you will find information about Art21’s latest film – shows Oct 24 4pm MT PBS, an interview with co-chairs of President’s Committee (on the arts), three items from the Artful Manager blog that I think you might be interested in, TransCultural Exchange Announces its 2011 Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts, and two opportunities and a resource for visual artists.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Broadcast Premiere on PBS This Week
Warm up your televisions and set your DVRs: Art21’s latest film, William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible, premieres on PBS this week. The national broadcast premiere is scheduled for October 21 at 10:00 p.m., though broadcast times vary by region (for example, the New York broadcast time is Wednesday, October 20, at 10:00 p.m.). Please remember to check your local listings to find out when the program will air on your local PBS station. (
Sunday, October 24  —  4:00pm MT PBS – Beck)
Screenings Across the Country
Preview screenings of William Kentridge: Anything Is Possible continue this week and throughout October at select venues across the country. Screening hosts represent a broad range of organizations and institutions. Visit the film site to find a preview screening near you.
MONTANA (Missoula Art Museum showed the film last weekend- Oct 16-17)
Helena, MT
Holter Museum of Art
12 E Lawrence, Helena, MT 59601
October 26th, 7 p.m.
Educators’ Guide and Screening Companion
A free 26-page educators’ guide and screening companion has been produced to accompany the film. The guide is designed for use in a wide range of cultural and educational institutions, and will be available for download from the film site later this week.
Barry’s Blog
(“Well I think that we’re interested in the notion of the Artist’s Corps (along the lines of the Peace Corps); developing that concept, but doing the research that is necessary first, to analyze the need and the manner in which we can meet those needs to have more artists working, particularly in schools.”)
THE ARTFUL MANAGER | WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
POWER (THROUGH PLASTIC) TO THE PEOPLE
Anyone interested in sales for small arts organizations or independent artists should be watching Square, the device and service that turns your iPhone, iPad, or Android phone into a credit card processor. It makes a formerly cumbersome process brainlessly easy. And that changes the game.
Posted: Thursday, October 7, 2010
PRESERVATION V. PROTECTION…
Copyright law has always walked the tightrope between monopoly and community. A new report commissioned by the Library of Congress suggests that it’s officially gone too far in one particular direction. In essence, any organization or individual passionate about preserving recorded sound has to break the law to do so…including nonprofits.
Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010
COST AND CREATIVITY…
KCRW’s “The Business” radio show/podcast offers a great interview with film director Stephen Frears on his experiences in independent and major studio filmmaking. Frears shows refreshing self-awareness about how money, time, and risk shape his ability to do his preferred creative work.
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2010
TransCultural Exchange Announces its 2011 Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts: The Interconnected World April 7 – April 10, 2011

Registration is now open for TransCultural Exchange’s 3rd biennial Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts: The Interconnected World. Don’t miss out on this rare opportunity to meet more than 70 speakers from around the world to learn about long- and short-term residencies, funding, exchange programs and other international platforms for launching your work. It all takes place April 7-10, 2011, when Boston is transformed into the hub of the global arts community.

http://www.transculturalexchange.org/conference_2011/overview.htm

The 2011 Conference will be TransCultural Exchange’s largest yet, offering time to hear, discuss and share your work at the more than 50 sessions, workshops, portfolio reviews, networking events, screenings, gallery receptions and new exhibitors’ hall.

Experience Boston’s cultural offerings with tours of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Boston Center for the Arts, MIT’s Art and Architecture Program and the Boston Public Library. Attend events, concerts, readings, exhibits and talks by leading artists, critics and researchers at such institutions as MIT, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Northeastern University and Boston University.

Be sure to register early to get the portfolio review of your choice; and don’t miss out on additional opportunities to participate as either an artist, writer, exhibitor, sponsor or academic institution.

Registration:
Early Registration is $275, due midnight EST, December 15, 2010.Registration is $345 after December 15, 2010; and $425 after April 1.
Student discount registration is $115, due midnight EST, December 15, 2010.
Applications for scholarships are due November 15, 2010.
About TransCultural Exchange:
TransCultural Exchange is a 501c3 non-profit organization, whose mission is to bridge cultural, geographic, political and linguistic divides by bringing people together through the arts in order to foster a greater understanding of world cultures.

VISUAL ARTS
Request for Proposals
Application for Exhibits at The Coconino Center for the Arts in 2011 and Beyond –
MAIN GALLERY
Postmark Deadline: January 14th, 2011 See attached 2010_Main_Gallery_Application_CCA.pdf for more information
Request for Proposals
Application for Exhibits in the Jewel Gallery at The Coconino Center for the Arts in 2011 & 2012
(See Application for Specific Dates)
JEWEL GALLERY
Postmark Deadline: January 14th, 2011 See attached 2010_Jewell_Gallery_Application.pdf
The Phillips Collection Receives IMLS Grant to Complete Digitization of Permanent Collection

The Phillips Collection has received a grant of $65,390 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to complete its online collections digitization project. The project involves photographing the museum’s permanent collection of impressionist and modern American and European art and producing high-resolution digital scans to be used on its website.

The online collections database project is part of a larger initiative to make the museum’s permanent collection and library holdings accessible to a worldwide audience. To date, the museum has digitized more than half of its collection.

Artists 10-20-2010

Montana’s Talented Youth


A friend called today to say she’d been to see the Student Art Exhibit in the State Capitol Rotunda, which we’d helped Lt. Governor Bohlinger arrange for National Arts and Humanities Month.

She mentioned one poem in particular that had struck her, and how she’ll remember it for a long time to come. I thought I should share it.

Bringing Summer to an End

The moon’s gate swings wide.
A woman steps between the open doors,
leaves falling, orange and red, at her bare feet.
Hair white as rabbit’s fur wraps her.
She reaches toward the Earth,
fingertips swirling the clouds below.
here breath chills the ground as the sky
fills with icy flakes, each a crafted star,
a gift from the moon.
Her lips, blue and frozen,
kiss the lakes and ponds.
Frost crawls across the waters.
Snow covers the mountains.

James Keller
Big Sky High School, Missoula, Grade 12

I realize I can’t share all of the poetry and the artwork
from: Signatures From the Big Sky 2010,

or the amazing array of work from local Helena schools, but I hope this small representative collection of the talent of Montana’s youth will inspire each of you to visit the rotunda before the end of October.

I offer a big thanks to all the students, teachers, parents, and schools that participated in arts and literature projects over the past year. I’d also like to thank Pearl Pallister for her artistic hand in the exhibit, Brian and Stefanie Flynn for the design and construction of the portable display units, and General Services Administration for the loan of easels and some heavy-lifting.
KBH
Montana’s Talented Youth