Public Art Opportunity in Butte


Applications are now being taken for the latest Percent for Art Program project

Natural Resources Building

(MBMG-Petroleum Engineering)
Montana Tech of The University of Montana
Butte, Montana
Montana Arts Council
Percent for Art Program

Eligibility: The call for artists is open to all Montana residents
Budget: Up to $43,200

http://art.mt.gov/artists/artists_percent_Butte.asp

Contact: Kim Baraby Hurtle, Program Manager

khurtle@mt.gov
406-444-6639

The online application process will close 11:59 p.m. MST on July 18th, 2010.

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Public Art Opportunity in Butte

Green Papers of Note….

Leigh Patton (from Tennessee) sent out an email today….

I am happy to announce that two Green Papers* have been posted by our peers on the Americans for the Arts’ ARTSblog. Maryo Gard Ewell adapted her monograph “Effective Community Arts Development: Fifty Years, Fifty Tips” to address the future of community development, and George Tzougros wrote a paper titled “State Arts Agencies 2.0.”
AFTA identified some folks to facilitate online conversation about the green papers, and Joanna Chin of Animating Democracy is the ambassador for Maryo’s paper. I have the pleasure of acting as ambassador for George’s paper. Furthermore, our colleague in Illinois, Jennifer Armstrong, is serving as ambassador for a paper submitted by AFTA’s Emerging Leaders Council, “The Future of Leadership.”
I hope you all will take a few minutes to read the papers and join the discussion. At the end of the year, the authors will synthesize the themes of the online discussions into new perspectives.**
Click this link for Maryo’s paper: http://blog.artsusa.org/category/community-development/

Click this link for George’s paper: http://blog.artsusa.org/category/state-arts-agencies/

Click this link for the Future of Leadership paper: http://blog.artsusa.org/category/leadership-greenpapers/

If you are competitive by nature, please note that each paper is ranked according to its “popularity,” which I think might be based on number of views or comments. Let’s make our topics the most popular of the blog – comment early and often!
*Green Papers are short, easy to read, visions of the future meant to inspire a nationwide dialogue on the future of the arts. As a way to celebrate the successes of the past 50 years in the arts field, Americans for the Arts has collected Green Papers from a variety of national arts service organizations and peer groups representing different perspectives and disciplines.
**Green Papers are a chance for anyone who cares about the arts to talk about a particular discipline or interest area in a facilitated, open forum. Ambassadors will continue this dialogue throughout the year–capturing and synthesizing the ideas, changes, and themes that arise from online discussions. At the end of the year, new Green Papers will emerge that will reflect the overarching changes and ideas proposed through this democratic forum process.

Green Papers of Note….

Artists 4-22-10

Artists,
Below you will find information on the Cultural Trust Grant – applications now available, new online resources from the National Endowment for the Arts, two new videos from Art 21, three opportunities for visual artists and one for theatre.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Give Mother Nature a high-five today,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
CULTURAL TRUST GRANT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
Applications for the Cultural and Aesthetic Project grants are now available from the Montana Arts Council at http://art.mt.gov/. Applications must be for cultural and aesthetic projects, including but not limited to the visual, performing, literary and media arts, history, archaeology, folklore, archives, collections, research, historic preservation and the construction or renovation of cultural facilities. These grants are made every two years through funding from Montana’s Cultural Trust.  The grant period runs from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 and online application deadline is July 30, 2010
Applications are divided into one of the three categories below:
— Special Projects – For events of limited duration, planned expansions of organizations, or projects that generate new sources of revenue.
— Operational Support – available to organizations who meet specific criteria.
— Capital Expenditures – For construction or renovation of cultural facilities, historic preservation or the purchase of art or artifacts.
A 16-member citizen’s advisory committee will review proposed projects and make funding recommendations to the 2011 Montana Legislature, which makes the final decisions on all Cultural and Aesthetic Project grants.
This is the first year that the Montana Arts Council will be using an entirely online process for this application.  Guidelines and a link to the online application are available on the Montana Arts Council website: http://art.mt.gov/
From the National Endowment for the Arts:
The NEA is now on Twitter: www.twitter.com/NEAarts
We’re in the podcast business at last! A free podcast will be posted each Thursday in the Audio section, featuring one-on-one interviews with everyone from NEA Jazz Masters to leading arts experts to National Medal of Arts winners and more. To see the most recent, including yesterday’s interview with U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan, go to http://www.arts.gov/av/index_a.html  (We will begin to post our podcasts in iTunes U later this year. Until then, please bookmark this page or subscribe to the Art Works blog for updates.)
The 2010 the Poetry Out Loud National Finals are coming up on April 26 and 27 – for more information, including a link to the list of the 53 state champions, see the release at http://www.arts.gov/news/news10/poetry-out-loud-2010-finals.html
Rounding out this week’s contributions to National Poetry Month, we’ve added work by the recipients of 2009 Literature Fellowships in Poetry to the Writers Corner at http://www.arts.gov/features/writers/index.html (Montana’s Loren Graham is featured here – Beck)
Art21 News:
 Exclusive Videos: Susan Rothenberg and William Kentridge
Our most recent Exclusive videos explore ways that artists transform difficult personal experiences and traumatic events into moving works of art.
Susan Rothenberg: Emotions
Episode #099: Filmed at her home and studio in New Mexico, artist Susan Rothenberg explains how she transforms personal experiences and feelings into works that can become an “emotional moment” for the viewer. While discussing the loss of her dog, Rothenberg describes the process of recovering a memory of her pet through the act of painting.
William Kentridge: Pain & Sympathy
Episode #100: With his video History of the Main Complaint (1996) serving as a backdrop, William Kentridge discusses how artists draw upon tragedy as subject matter for their work and how drawing itself can be a compassionate act.
VISUAL ARTS
 
New American Paintings CALL FOR ARTISTS : West Region
Artists living in: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Wyoming!

Juror: Toby Kamps, Senior Curator, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston
Online Submission Deadline: April 30, 2010
To Apply online you will need to prepare four jpegs of your work (no larger than 1200 pixels at their greatest dimension) and a credit card for the entry fee of $40.
Click here to register and submit your entries to the West competition:
www.newamericanpaintings.net/submission/

For more information, please visit
http://www.newamericanpaintings.com/competitions.html

Candidates are being sought for the full-time Executive Director position at the Custer County Art & Heritage Center, Miles City, Montana. The E.D. supervises a small staff and reports to and is responsible to the Board of Directors of this tax-exempt, public-service organization that has provided art exhibitions and education programs for this rural, southeastern Montana region since 1977.
APPLICATION: Visit the web site at < http://www.ccac.milescity.org/ > to view the facility overview, job responsibilities and access an application form. Or, you may request an application form by submitting a letter of interest to Custer County Art & Heritage Center, PO Box 1284, Miles City, MT 59301.
Applications will be accepted until June 15, 2010.
56thJuried Exhibition at The Haggin Museum
2010 National Art Competition Sponsored by the Stockton Art League
Call for Entries
Exhibition at The Haggin Museum September 2 to October 31, 2010
This is an open juried art competition and exhibition. The original competition was conceived to recognize, promote and reward excellence in Northern California art. It has grown to include artists from throughout the United States.
Over $5,000 in total cash awards will be presented.
CATEGORIES: 1. Acrylics and Oils 2. Water Media 3. Mixed Media & Graphics 4. Sculpture 5. Pastel
DEADLINE: All entries must be postmarked by July 7, 2010.
THEATRE
Theatre Communications Group (TCG) now accepting applications for Fox Foundation Resident Actor Fellowships, Round 5
Online registration and application postmark deadline: June 11, 2010
See attached PDF for more information
Artists 4-22-10

Arts Educators 4-22-10

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information on the Cultural Trust grant applications – now available, an article “Education creative thinkers is good for the economy,” Doing Well and Doing Good by Doing Art:, several new resources online from the National Endowment for the Arts, two new videos from Art 21 News, links to Secretary Duncan and Chairman Landesman’s remarks at the Arts Education Partnership forum, Advocacy on the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and 10 Tactics for Turning Information into Action.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Give Mother Nature a high-five today,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
There are some new posts on my blog:  http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/

CULTURAL TRUST GRANT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE

Applications for the Cultural and Aesthetic Project grants are now available from the Montana Arts Council at http://art.mt.gov/. Applications must be for cultural and aesthetic projects, including but not limited to the visual, performing, literary and media arts, history, archaeology, folklore, archives, collections, research, historic preservation and the construction or renovation of cultural facilities. These grants are made every two years through funding from Montana’s Cultural Trust.  The grant period runs from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 and online application deadline is July 30, 2010
Applications are divided into one of the three categories below:
— Special Projects – For events of limited duration, planned expansions of organizations, or projects that generate new sources of revenue.
— Operational Support – available to organizations who meet specific criteria.
— Capital Expenditures – For construction or renovation of cultural facilities, historic preservation or the purchase of art or artifacts.
A 16-member citizen’s advisory committee will review proposed projects and make funding recommendations to the 2011 Montana Legislature, which makes the final decisions on all Cultural and Aesthetic Project grants.
This is the first year that the Montana Arts Council will be using an entirely online process for this application.  Guidelines and a link to the online application are available on the Montana Arts Council website: http://art.mt.gov/
A recent guest column in The Seattle Times, Educating creative thinkers is good for the economy, illuminates the ties between our economy, innovation, and the importance of K-12 arts education in Washington schools. Co-signed by Susan Coliton, vice president of The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and Patricia A. Wasley, dean of the College of Education at the University of Washington, the column highlights the Washington State Arts Commission’s recently completed report on arts education, K — 12 Arts Education: Every Student, Every School, Every Year, and calls for an increased investment in arts education for all Washington students.
Doing Well and Doing Good by Doing Art
A new AEP Wire http://www.aep-arts.org/files/AEPWireDoingWell.pdf   from the Arts Education Partnership was recently released on James Catterall’s new book, Doing Well and Doing Good by Doing Art: The Effects of Education in the Visual and Performing Arts on the Achievements and Values of Young Adults. The book discusses a longitudinal study spanning 10 years and 12,000 students that examines low income students and how their engagement in the arts affects their future. The Wire summarizes the significance of the study, potential limitations and recommendations for future research.
From the National Endowment for the Arts:
The NEA is now on Twitter: www.twitter.com/NEAarts
We’re in the podcast business at last! A free podcast will be posted each Thursday in the Audio section, featuring one-on-one interviews with everyone from NEA Jazz Masters to leading arts experts to National Medal of Arts winners and more. To see the most recent, including yesterday’s interview with U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan, go to http://www.arts.gov/av/index_a.html  (We will begin to post our podcasts in iTunes U later this year. Until then, please bookmark this page or subscribe to the Art Works blog for updates.)
The 2010 the Poetry Out Loud National Finals are coming up on April 26 and 27 – for more information, including a link to the list of the 53 state champions, see the release at http://www.arts.gov/news/news10/poetry-out-loud-2010-finals.html
Rounding out this week’s contributions to National Poetry Month, we’ve added work by the recipients of 2009 Literature Fellowships in Poetry to the Writers Corner at http://www.arts.gov/features/writers/index.html (Montana’s Loren Graham is featured here – Beck)
Art21 News:
 Exclusive Videos: Susan Rothenberg and William Kentridge
Our most recent Exclusive videos explore ways that artists transform difficult personal experiences and traumatic events into moving works of art.
Susan Rothenberg: Emotions
Episode #099: Filmed at her home and studio in New Mexico, artist Susan Rothenberg explains how she transforms personal experiences and feelings into works that can become an “emotional moment” for the viewer. While discussing the loss of her dog, Rothenberg describes the process of recovering a memory of her pet through the act of painting.
William Kentridge: Pain & Sympathy
Episode #100: With his video History of the Main Complaint (1996) serving as a backdrop, William Kentridge discusses how artists draw upon tragedy as subject matter for their work and how drawing itself can be a compassionate act.
Secretary of Education Duncan and NEA Chairman Landesman Confirm Role of Arts in Complete Education

Appearing together in a unique joint session at the AEP (Arts Education Partnership) Forum last week, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Rocco Landesman confirmed their support for a complete education that includes the arts. The addresses were part of the plenary session, “A Well-Rounded Education in the 21st Century,” at the Partnership’s National Forum on April 9 in Washington, DC. The meeting was the first public appearance of the two agency heads. The two leaders’ remarks, while differing in details, expressed similar ideas: Secretary Duncan cited the power of arts learning to boost student achievement and improve college graduation, and noted, “arts education is essential to stimulating the creativity and innovation that will prove critical to young Americans competing in a global economy.”  Chairman Landesman also portrayed the arts as crucial to student success: “The arts provide us with new ways of thinking, new ways to draw connections…and they help maintain our competitive edge by engendering innovation and creativity.” The texts of the two speeches are available online (Secretary Duncan; Chairman Landesman). The remarks of the two leaders were also the focus of an April 9 EdWeek blog posting found here

Advocacy on ESEA

Advocates for arts education have learned a great deal from the recent debate over health care reform, which was revised due to a very public legislative process and controversial public opinion-claims. To increase federal commitment behind arts education, arts stakeholders have been in debate and discussions with Congress to get a clear and shared understanding about what education is and what are the ultimate goals for the children of our nation. Leading organizations have offered specific recommendations and are seeking changes to the Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to strengthen provisions for increased funding, research and reporting in arts education, as well as recognition of the arts as a core academic subject.

Nonprofit Online News: http://news.gilbert.org/
+ 10 Tactics for Turning Information into Action (This is for rights activists but I think it has something for the arts education community too – Beck)
   I have lost count of the number of activists I’ve met whose basic strategy for social or political change is premised on the notion of “if only they knew the facts”. Sadly, facts and opinion have a confusing relationship in people’s minds, at best. (I recently read some research that showed that, all other things being equal, hearing that scientists are skeptical about ESP actually increased many people’s belief.) Because we care about certain issues, we tend to think that the information about that issue will be transparently motivating. But it’s not.
   The Tactical Technology Collective has put out a website (with videos and training cards) on 10 Tactics for Turning Information into Action. Although they are not going to change human nature, they can sure help us be a little smarter about how we use the information we care about. In summary, the ten tactics are: mobilise people, witness & record, visualize your message, amplify personal stories, just add humor, manage your contacts, use complex data, use collective intelligence, let people ask the questions, and investigate & expose. For each of these there are video stories, case studies, suggestions for use, featured tools, and tips.
Arts Educators 4-22-10

Arts Organizations 4-22-2010

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on Save America’s Treasures grants, Cultural Trust grant applications are available, Service Despite Stress: Museum Attendance and Funding in a Year of Recession report, several items from the Artful Manager blog – student loan forgiveness for the arts is one, new online resources from the National Endowment for the Arts, 10 Tactics for Turning Information into Action, Adventures in Email Fundraising, Social Networking Strategies and Tactics Seminar, Board Café: Nonprofit Business Model Statements, and two job openings – one is the E.D. position at Custer Co. Art and Heritage Center.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Give Mother Nature a high-five today,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092 http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
Save America’s Treasures Accepting Applications
Save America’s Treasures http://www.preservationnation.org/travel-and-sites/save-americas-treasures/   is now accepting grant applications for 2010. Grants are awarded for preservation and/or conservation work on nationally significant intellectual and cultural artifacts and nationally significant historic structures and sites. Grant amounts range from $25,000 to $700,000 to conserve collections and from $125,000 to $700,000 for historic property and sites projects. All the awards must be matched 1:1. Complete guidelines, applications and information, as well as a database of previous Save America’s Treasures awardees, can be found at the National Park Service.  http://www.preservationnation.org/travel-and-sites/save-americas-treasures/  Deadline for applications is May 21, 2010. All applicants must register on Grants.gov to apply to this program.

CULTURAL TRUST GRANT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE

Applications for the Cultural and Aesthetic Project grants are now available from the Montana Arts Council at http://art.mt.gov/. Applications must be for cultural and aesthetic projects, including but not limited to the visual, performing, literary and media arts, history, archaeology, folklore, archives, collections, research, historic preservation and the construction or renovation of cultural facilities. These grants are made every two years through funding from Montana’s Cultural Trust.  The grant period runs from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 and online application deadline is July 30, 2010
Applications are divided into one of the three categories below:
— Special Projects – For events of limited duration, planned expansions of organizations, or projects that generate new sources of revenue.
— Operational Support – available to organizations who meet specific criteria.
— Capital Expenditures – For construction or renovation of cultural facilities, historic preservation or the purchase of art or artifacts.
A 16-member citizen’s advisory committee will review proposed projects and make funding recommendations to the 2011 Montana Legislature, which makes the final decisions on all Cultural and Aesthetic Project grants.
This is the first year that the Montana Arts Council will be using an entirely online process for this application.  Guidelines and a link to the online application are available on the Montana Arts Council website: http://art.mt.gov/
Museum Attendance and Funding in a Year of Recession
The American Association of Museums (AAM) surveyed its members in January 2010 to better understand how museums have fared during the recession. A major­ity of museums reported at least moderate financial stress in 2009. A majority of museums also reported an increase in attendance, observed across museum type, budget size, and geography. For additional findings, please see the AAM report Service Despite Stress: Museum Attendance and Funding in a Year of Recession.   http://www.aam-us.org/upload/Service-Despite-Stress.pdf
THE ARTFUL MANAGER | WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
THE RISE OF THE API…
You may not be aware of it, but you’re likely highly dependent on APIs, or ”application programming interfaces.” Why should you care?
Because, in part, your audiences, artists, and supporters are increasingly dependent, as well.
Posted: Monday, April  5, 2010
STUDENT LOAN FORGIVENESS FOR THE ARTS…
If you’re working in the nonprofit or public arts, or plan to be, and you’re carrying Federal student loans, it’s a good time to be sure your record-keeping is in order.
Posted: Friday, April  9, 2010
MORE METRICS FOR ARTISTIC SUCCESS…
A cluster of theater service organizations in the UK offer an alternative measurement of theatrical success, which they hope counters the current methods of headcounts and box office receipts.
Posted: Monday, April 12, 2010
NET PRESENT JOY (NPJ)…
In the business world, Net Present Value (NPV) has long been an essential calculation when making investment and program decisions. I humbly suggest a new decision-support formula for arts and culture, not based on economic value, but based on a different utility: joy.
Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010
BILL IVEY ON ARTS POLICY, THE OBAMA TRANSITION, AND EXPRESSIVE LIFE…
Video of the public talk in Madison last fall by Bill Ivey, director of the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Pubic Policy at Vanderbilt University, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts.
Worth a watch!
Posted: Wednesday, April 14, 2010
From the National Endowment for the Arts:
The NEA is now on Twitter: www.twitter.com/NEAarts
We’re in the podcast business at last! A free podcast will be posted each Thursday in the Audio section, featuring one-on-one interviews with everyone from NEA Jazz Masters to leading arts experts to National Medal of Arts winners and more. To see the most recent, including yesterday’s interview with U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan, go to http://www.arts.gov/av/index_a.html  (We will begin to post our podcasts in iTunes U later this year. Until then, please bookmark this page or subscribe to the Art Works blog for updates.)
The 2010 the Poetry Out Loud National Finals are coming up on April 26 and 27 – for more information, including a link to the list of the 53 state champions, see the release at http://www.arts.gov/news/news10/poetry-out-loud-2010-finals.html
Rounding out this week’s contributions to National Poetry Month, we’ve added work by the recipients of 2009 Literature Fellowships in Poetry to the Writers Corner at http://www.arts.gov/features/writers/index.html (Montana’s Loren Graham is featured here – Beck)
Nonprofit Online News: http://news.gilbert.org/
+ 10 Tactics for Turning Information into Action (This is for rights activists but I think it has something for the arts community too – Beck)
   I have lost count of the number of activists I’ve met whose basic strategy for social or political change is premised on the notion of “if only they knew the facts”. Sadly, facts and opinion have a confusing relationship in people’s minds, at best. (I recently read some research that showed that, all other things being equal, hearing that scientists are skeptical about ESP actually increased many people’s belief.) Because we care about certain issues, we tend to think that the information about that issue will be transparently motivating. But it’s not.
   The Tactical Technology Collective has put out a website (with videos and training cards) on 10 Tactics for Turning Information into Action. Although they are not going to change human nature, they can sure help us be a little smarter about how we use the information we care about. In summary, the ten tactics are: mobilise people, witness & record, visualize your message, amplify personal stories, just add humor, manage your contacts, use complex data, use collective intelligence, let people ask the questions, and investigate & expose. For each of these there are video stories, case studies, suggestions for use, featured tools, and tips.
+ Adventures in Email Fundraising
   Writing for Idealware, Andrea Berry has profiled two Adventures in Email Fundraising: what she calls the “basic email fundraising” of the White Mountain School in New Hampshire and the “social media extravaganza” of the United Way of Western Connecticut. Although I have my misgivings about the use of case studies, I have to remember that there are plenty of organizations for whom email still plays little or no role in fundraising. It’s good to see what people are doing.
+ Social Networking Strategies and Tactics Seminar on May 26, 2010
   Despite the fact that we all know that anecdotes are not data, often all we have to go on when making decisions about new online tools is stories. How in the world do we make decisions about investments in social networking when stories are all we have to go on? The key is to learn to ask the right questions. And the right questions aren’t about this tool or that — they are about your strategies and your stakeholders. That’s what our seminar on Social Networking Strategies and Tactics emphasizes. Now that word is spreading about some organizations’ disappointment in these tools, you need a solid model for deciding on investments and assessing whether they are actually working. That way, when it comes to knowing how you’re doing, you and your organization won’t be just telling stories.

Nonprofit Business Model Statements

Although every nonprofit has a mission statement that defines the organization’s core purpose and work, many are unaware of its useful companion, the business model statement: a brief summary that spells out the organization’s economic drivers. Like a mission statement, a business model statement acts as a touchstone: a reminder and a guide for the organization’s focus and strategies.
Nonprofit executives and board members usually have a good sense of the various types of funding that support the organization, but they may have a harder time explaining the organization’s business model. To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/node/505
JOB OPENINGS
Candidates are being sought for the full-time Executive Director position at the Custer County Art & Heritage Center, Miles City, Montana. The E.D. supervises a small staff and reports to and is responsible to the Board of Directors of this tax-exempt, public-service organization that has provided art exhibitions and education programs for this rural, southeastern Montana region since 1977.
APPLICATION: Visit the web site at < http://www.ccac.milescity.org/ > to view the facility overview, job responsibilities and access an application form. Or, you may request an application form by submitting a letter of interest to Custer County Art & Heritage Center, PO Box 1284, Miles City, MT 59301.
Applications will be accepted until June 15, 2010.
Arts Consulting Group requests your interest or candidate recommendations for the Director of Development position at Long Beach Opera in Long Beach, California. See attached for more information
Arts Organizations 4-22-2010