Hype, Anxiety, and Hope (HAH!): How To Do Social Media Wrong (and How To Do It Right)

I do love this guy….

By Michael C. Gilbert

I’m teaching about Blog Networks and other social media this week and I’ve realized a blunt truth:
There is a wrong way and a right way to approach social media. The wrong way results in anxiety, blind risk, expense, low-value list building, and empty lessons. The right way results in clarity, methodical growth, managed risk, network effects, husbanding of resources, high-value organizing of influencers, and ongoing learning.

The Wrong Way: HAH!
Almost every organization is pursuing social media the wrong way. It’s easy to understand why this is the case. We have been playing catch up for years with new communication technology. New words and brands come flying at us every time we turn around. Vendors and others who are themselves anxious about the wagons to which they have hitched themselves keep telling us that we’ll “fall behind”. (That destructive pattern has been going on for almost twenty years!) We are insecure about our ability to make decisions in a field that seems dominated by the language of “experts”.
What that means is that our “strategic” approach for social media is basically a combination of Hype, Anxiety, and Hope. You can remember this by its abbreviation: HAH! (You’re right. I don’t think much of this approach. There is just too much at stake.) The symptoms of this approach are widespread. I’ll describe three.
The first key symptom of HAH! is found…

Hype, Anxiety, and Hope (HAH!): How To Do Social Media Wrong (and How To Do It Right)

Arts Educators 3-24-10

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information on VSA’s call for teaching artists with disabilities, Art21 two new videos, DOE Blueprint for ESEA reauthorization, National Arts and Disability Center website, and the Bozeman Sculpture Park Board is looking for members.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092
VSA Call for Teaching Artists with Disabilities
Fellowships for Teaching Artists with Disabilities in the Visual and Performing Arts
Application Deadline: April 23, 2010
Art21  Exclusive Videos: Paul McCarthy and Jessica Stockholder
How do you know when an artwork is finished? What makes something uncanny, something beautiful? Our most recent Exclusive videos highlight two artists who, while working from different sculptural traditions, share an open-ended creative process that’s responsive to an artwork’s form.
Paul McCarthy: Lifecasting
Episode #095: Surrounded by various figurative sculptures in progress in his Los Angeles studio, including an over-sized bust of President George W. Bush, artist Paul McCarthy discusses the process of casting from life and the resulting perfections and imperfections.
Jessica Stockholder: Form
Episode #096: From her home in New Haven, Connecticut, Jessica Stockholder discusses the strength of form and the difficulty in articulating the meaning behind abstract shapes.
U.S Department of Education Releases Blueprint for ESEA Reauthorization
The U.S Department of Education has released A Blueprint for Reform: The Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This publication constitutes a major policy document, outlining the President’s vision for the next generation of ESEA (formerly known as the No Child Left Behind Act). Among its recommendations are emphases on college and career readiness, training great teachers and leaders, providing equity and opportunity, and fostering innovation and improvement. The Blueprint is available at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/blueprint/index.html.
The National Arts and Disability Center’s (NADC)  mission is to promote the full inclusion of audiences and artists with disabilities into all facets of the arts community. The NADC is a leading consultant in the arts and disability community, and the only center of its kind. Our information is aimed at artists with disabilities, arts organizations, museums, arts administrators, disability organizations and agencies, performing arts organizations, art centers, universities, arts educators, and students. The NADC is a project of the University of California, at Los Angeles, Tarjan Center. The NADC web site offers free resource directories, and annotated bibliographies on a wide array of subjects. http://nadc.ucla.edu/
SECRITARY AND BOARD MEMBER POSITIONS AVAILABLE WITH THE BOZEMAN SCULPTURE PARK BOARD
     The Bozeman Sculpture Park is envisioned as a premier venue for large, outdoor sculptures located adjacent to the Bozeman Public Library in downtown Bozeman. 
     Board Member responsibilities include, but are not limited to, attending monthly board meetings, voting, researching, planning, designing, marketing, promoting, contributing, and fundraising for the park.
     The Secretaries responsibilities include those listed above as well as transcribing the correspondence of each monthly board meeting.  Good writing and listening skills are a plus! 
     Please email a short letter to collinletts@yahoo.com stating why you are interested in the position and how you think your qualifications might contribute to the Bozeman Sculpture Park mission.
     Please not that this is an unpaid, volunteer position, which requires a one to two year commitment. For more information please contact Collin at 406-579-1709. 

Arts Educators 3-24-10

Arts Organizations 3-24-2010

Arts Organizations,

Below you will find information on the Save America’s Treasures grant, grants that support glazing applications for preservation, “Come as You Are: Informal Arts Participation in Urban and Rural Communities,”  Using Flickr to Help Arts Organizations Tell Their Story, 2010 Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits, What Is Artistic Vibrancy?, Native Artists Study, Innovative Space Awards Call for Entries, National Arts and Disability Center website, two items from the Artful Manager blog, Board Café: Who is Responsible for the Board Doing a Good Job?, and two job openings.

Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092
Save America’s Treasures (SAT) is now accepting grant applications for 2010.  Grants are awarded for preservation and/or conservation work on nationally significant intellectual and cultural artifacts and nationally significant historic structures and sites. Grant amounts range from $25,000 to $700,000 to conserve collections and from $125,000 to $700,000 for historic property and sites projects. All the awards must be matched 1:1. Complete guidelines, applications and information, as well as a database of previous Save America Treasure’s awardees, can be found at the National Park Service. Deadline for applications is 21 May 2010. All applicants must register on Grants.gov to apply to this program. 
FAIC Announces May 1 Deadline for Tru Vue® Optium® Conservation Grant
Tru Vue® Inc. has partnered with the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) to offer grants to support projects in glazing applications for preservation of museum and library collections.  Funds are to help defray direct project costs, including supplies and publicity.  Projects must be supported by a conservator and demonstrate conservation goals.
Up to four awards will be made each year.  Each award includes a cash amount of up to $4,000 and donated Tru Vue® Optium® acrylic glazing materials.
Past recipients of the grant include The Walters Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Mariners’ Museum of Newport News, Virginia, the Newark Museum of New Jersey, the New York Historical Society, and the Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design.
To be eligible,
·        The applicant must be a not-for-profit collecting institution (museum or library) with active exhibition programs and located in one of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, or U.S. territories.
·        The institution must have at least one full-time conservator on staff, or a conservator who will be on contract for the project.
·        Projects should be completed within 12 months of the award date.
The deadline for receipt of all materials is May 1 and November 1 of each year.  Electronic submissions are encouraged but not required. 
Guidelines and forms are available on both the AIC/FAIC website, www.conservation-us.org/grants  and Tru Vue, www.tru-vue.com/museums/grants, or by calling the FAIC office at 202-452-9545.
National Endowment for the Arts Announces Research on Informal Arts Participation in Rural and Urban Areas 
Any serious reckoning of how Americans participate in arts and cultural activities must account for demographic and geographic diversity. Prior National Endowment for the Arts publications, including the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts, already have examined the age, race/ethnicity, gender, and education and income status of arts-goers. Another way to understand arts participation is by asking where it takes place. Come as You Are: Informal Arts Participation in Urban and Rural Communities is the NEA’s first research publication in several years to examine the “informal arts”—such as playing a musical instrument, attending an art event at a place of worship, or visiting a craft fair. The publication provides an analysis of arts participation in rural and urban areas.
Come as You Are: Informal Arts Participation in Urban and Rural Communities is available in print and pdf on the website. http://www.arts.gov/research/ResearchNotes_chrono.html
National Association of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) News
Using Flickr to Help Arts Organizations Tell Their Story
In the post “Why Flickr? Using Photos to Tell Your Story,”  http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1273  the Technology in the Arts blog, a service of the Center for Arts and Technology, highlighted examples of arts organizations that are effectively using Flickr. The article also highlights some on-line photo-sharing practices that organizations should avoid.
2010 Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits
Idealware, a nonprofit that provides candid software reviews and articles for other nonprofits, has published its first book. The Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1273 provides an overview of 35 different types of software that nonprofits might need, including donor management systems, social networking sites, on-line surveying platforms, and e-mail discussion lists. Written in accessible, nontechnical language, the guide is appropriate for nonprofit managers at all levels of software expertise.
What Is Artistic Vibrancy?
A new series of reports, Defining Artistic Vibrancy, http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/research/music/reports_and_publications/defining_artistic_vibrancy   from the Australia Council on the Arts http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/  looks at what it means for an organization to be artistically vibrant, including artistic quality and excellence, audience engagement, preservation and develop­ment of the discipline, artist development and community relevance. In addition to the main report, the Australia Council has also published several case studies, a self-reflection tool and a literature review of relevant research.
Native Artists Study
Native Artists: Livelihoods, Resources, Space, Gifts, http://www.hhh.umn.edu/projects/prie/pdf/NativeArtistsLivelihoodsResourcesSpaceGifts1209.pdf   from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, explores the challenges facing Native artists. Interviews conducted with 50 Ojibwe artists shed light on the employment, assets, career evolution, resource needs and barriers faced by North American Woodland Indian artists.
Innovative Space Awards Call for Entries
Leveraging Investments in Creativity (LINC), in collaboration with MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and supported by a funding partnership of the MetLife Foundation and the Ford Foundation, announces an open call for entries to the 2010 MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards, http://www.lincnet.net/artist-space/innovative-space-awards  a grant-making program of Space for Change: Building Community through Innovative Spaces. The awards recognize outstanding efforts in the design and development of affordable space for artists, emphasizing the benefits artist spaces yield for both artists and their communities. All application materials must be received by 5:00 p.m. Eastern on April 23, 2010. Visit LINC to learn more about the award guidelines.
The National Arts and Disability Center’s (NADC)  mission is to promote the full inclusion of audiences and artists with disabilities into all facets of the arts community. The NADC is a leading consultant in the arts and disability community, and the only center of its kind. Our information is aimed at artists with disabilities, arts organizations, museums, arts administrators, disability organizations and agencies, performing arts organizations, art centers, universities, arts educators, and students. The NADC is a project of the University of California, at Los Angeles, Tarjan Center. The NADC web site offers free resource directories, and annotated bibliographies on a wide array of subjects. http://nadc.ucla.edu/
THE ARTFUL MANAGER | WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
GENEROSITY AND CURIOSITY…
Yet more compelling and inspiring words from Ben Cameron of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation during his recent talk at TEDxYCC in Calgary. Well worth a watching.
Posted: Monday, March  8, 2010 (I haven’t had a chance to watch this but Ben Cameron is a great speaker so sending it on – Beck)
IS NEW TECHNOLOGY A COMPLEMENT OR SUPPLEMENT TO REAL-WORLD INTERACTION?…
Many take it as a given that new technologies distract us from real-world social interaction and encourage our cocooning into digitally-connected isolation. But recent research from Pew suggests otherwise.
Posted: Thursday, March 11, 2010

Who is Responsible for the Board Doing a Good Job?

Despite the importance of the nonprofit board, there’s strikingly little clarity about who is responsible for its performance. The answer in this Board Cafe article might surprise you:
Who is responsible for the board’s doing its job? And a related question: who’s responsible for improving a board that’s asleep, weak, or gone amok? One answer might be: the board is responsible for the board! Or possibly, it’s the board chair who is responsible for the board. Or sometimes: it’s both.
We agree with Peter Drucker: The responsibility for the board’s effective work — both governance and support — is ultimately the responsibility of the executive director.
This can sound paradoxical (or even depressing) at first, but veteran successful executives know the truth of this statement. Executives take on their shoulders the responsibility for the success or failure of the organization — every part of it. If there were any other part of the organization that was under-performing, no executive would shrug, do nothing, and blame the program director or the administrative director. The executive would act to improve performance.
In a similar way, if the board is doing its job under its own leadership, the executive director can simply support that leadership. Let’s look at the possible combinations of strong/weak boards and CEOs. (To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/node/504 )
JOB OPENINGS
The North Valley Arts Council of Grand Forks is seeking an Executive Director to oversee the operations of the arts council.  A complete job description can be found on the website at http://www.novac.org/.  Interested persons should e-mail resumes to Julie Rygg, President, at julie@visitgrandforks.com applications will be accepted until April 9, 2010.
SECRITARY AND BOARD MEMBER POSITIONS AVAILABLE WITH THE BOZEMAN SCULPTURE PARK BOARD
     The Bozeman Sculpture Park is envisioned as a premier venue for large, outdoor sculptures located adjacent to the Bozeman Public Library in downtown Bozeman. 
     Board Member responsibilities include, but are not limited to, attending monthly board meetings, voting, researching, planning, designing, marketing, promoting, contributing, and fundraising for the park.
     The Secretaries responsibilities include those listed above as well as transcribing the correspondence of each monthly board meeting.  Good writing and listening skills are a plus! 
     Please email a short letter to collinletts@yahoo.com stating why you are interested in the position and how you think your qualifications might contribute to the Bozeman Sculpture Park mission.
     Please not that this is an unpaid, volunteer position, which requires a one to two year commitment. For more information please contact Collin at 406-579-1709. 
Arts Organizations 3-24-2010

Arts Organizations 3-24-2010

Arts Organizations,

Below you will find information on the Save America’s Treasures grant, grants that support glazing applications for preservation, “Come as You Are: Informal Arts Participation in Urban and Rural Communities,” Using Flickr to Help Arts Organizations Tell Their Story, 2010 Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits, What Is Artistic Vibrancy?, Native Artists Study, Innovative Space Awards Call for Entries, National Arts and Disability Center website, two items from the Artful Manager blog, Board Café: Who is Responsible for the Board Doing a Good Job?, and two job openings.

Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.

Regards,

Beck

Beck McLaughlin

Education & Web Services Director

Montana Arts Council

PO Box 202201

Helena, MT 59620-2201

406-444-6522

Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092

Save America’s Treasures (SAT) is now accepting grant applications for 2010. Grants are awarded for preservation and/or conservation work on nationally significant intellectual and cultural artifacts and nationally significant historic structures and sites. Grant amounts range from $25,000 to $700,000 to conserve collections and from $125,000 to $700,000 for historic property and sites projects. All the awards must be matched 1:1. Complete guidelines, applications and information, as well as a database of previous Save America Treasure’s awardees, can be found at the National Park Service. Deadline for applications is 21 May 2010. All applicants must register on Grants.gov to apply to this program.

FAIC Announces May 1 Deadline for Tru Vue® Optium® Conservation Grant

Tru Vue® Inc. has partnered with the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC) to offer grants to support projects in glazing applications for preservation of museum and library collections. Funds are to help defray direct project costs, including supplies and publicity. Projects must be supported by a conservator and demonstrate conservation goals.

Up to four awards will be made each year. Each award includes a cash amount of up to $4,000 and donated Tru Vue® Optium® acrylic glazing materials.

Past recipients of the grant include The Walters Art Museum, Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Mariners’ Museum of Newport News, Virginia, the Newark Museum of New Jersey, the New York Historical Society, and the Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design.

To be eligible,

• The applicant must be a not-for-profit collecting institution (museum or library) with active exhibition programs and located in one of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, or U.S. territories.

• The institution must have at least one full-time conservator on staff, or a conservator who will be on contract for the project.

• Projects should be completed within 12 months of the award date.

The deadline for receipt of all materials is May 1 and November 1 of each year. Electronic submissions are encouraged but not required.

Guidelines and forms are available on both the AIC/FAIC website, http://www.conservation-us.org/grants and Tru Vue, http://www.tru-vue.com/museums/grants, or by calling the FAIC office at 202-452-9545.

National Endowment for the Arts Announces Research on Informal Arts Participation in Rural and Urban Areas

Any serious reckoning of how Americans participate in arts and cultural activities must account for demographic and geographic diversity. Prior National Endowment for the Arts publications, including the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts, already have examined the age, race/ethnicity, gender, and education and income status of arts-goers. Another way to understand arts participation is by asking where it takes place. Come as You Are: Informal Arts Participation in Urban and Rural Communities is the NEA’s first research publication in several years to examine the “informal arts”—such as playing a musical instrument, attending an art event at a place of worship, or visiting a craft fair. The publication provides an analysis of arts participation in rural and urban areas.

Come as You Are: Informal Arts Participation in Urban and Rural Communities is available in print and pdf on the website. http://www.arts.gov/research/ResearchNotes_chrono.html

National Association of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) News

Using Flickr to Help Arts Organizations Tell Their Story

In the post “Why Flickr? Using Photos to Tell Your Story,” http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1273 the Technology in the Arts blog, a service of the Center for Arts and Technology, highlighted examples of arts organizations that are effectively using Flickr. The article also highlights some on-line photo-sharing practices that organizations should avoid.

2010 Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits

Idealware, a nonprofit that provides candid software reviews and articles for other nonprofits, has published its first book. The Field Guide to Software for Nonprofits http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1273 provides an overview of 35 different types of software that nonprofits might need, including donor management systems, social networking sites, on-line surveying platforms, and e-mail discussion lists. Written in accessible, nontechnical language, the guide is appropriate for nonprofit managers at all levels of software expertise.

What Is Artistic Vibrancy?

A new series of reports, Defining Artistic Vibrancy, http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/research/music/reports_and_publications/defining_artistic_vibrancy from the Australia Council on the Arts http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/ looks at what it means for an organization to be artistically vibrant, including artistic quality and excellence, audience engagement, preservation and develop¬ment of the discipline, artist development and community relevance. In addition to the main report, the Australia Council has also published several case studies, a self-reflection tool and a literature review of relevant research.

Native Artists Study

Native Artists: Livelihoods, Resources, Space, Gifts, http://www.hhh.umn.edu/projects/prie/pdf/NativeArtistsLivelihoodsResourcesSpaceGifts1209.pdf from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, explores the challenges facing Native artists. Interviews conducted with 50 Ojibwe artists shed light on the employment, assets, career evolution, resource needs and barriers faced by North American Woodland Indian artists.

Innovative Space Awards Call for Entries

Leveraging Investments in Creativity (LINC), in collaboration with MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and supported by a funding partnership of the MetLife Foundation and the Ford Foundation, announces an open call for entries to the 2010 MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards, http://www.lincnet.net/artist-space/innovative-space-awards a grant-making program of Space for Change: Building Community through Innovative Spaces. The awards recognize outstanding efforts in the design and development of affordable space for artists, emphasizing the benefits artist spaces yield for both artists and their communities. All application materials must be received by 5:00 p.m. Eastern on April 23, 2010. Visit LINC to learn more about the award guidelines.

The National Arts and Disability Center’s (NADC) mission is to promote the full inclusion of audiences and artists with disabilities into all facets of the arts community. The NADC is a leading consultant in the arts and disability community, and the only center of its kind. Our information is aimed at artists with disabilities, arts organizations, museums, arts administrators, disability organizations and agencies, performing arts organizations, art centers, universities, arts educators, and students. The NADC is a project of the University of California, at Los Angeles, Tarjan Center. The NADC web site offers free resource directories, and annotated bibliographies on a wide array of subjects. http://nadc.ucla.edu/

THE ARTFUL MANAGER
WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com

GENEROSITY AND CURIOSITY…

Yet more compelling and inspiring words from Ben Cameron of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation during his recent talk at TEDxYCC in Calgary. Well worth a watching.

http://www.artsjournal.com/artfulmanager/main/generosity-and-curiosity.php

Posted: Monday, March 8, 2010 (I haven’t had a chance to watch this but Ben Cameron is a great speaker so sending it on – Beck)

IS NEW TECHNOLOGY A COMPLEMENT OR SUPPLEMENT TO REAL-WORLD INTERACTION?…

Many take it as a given that new technologies distract us from real-world social interaction and encourage our cocooning into digitally-connected isolation. But recent research from Pew suggests otherwise.

http://www.artsjournal.com/artfulmanager/main/is-new-technology-a-complement.php

Posted: Thursday, March 11, 2010

Who is Responsible for the Board Doing a Good Job?

Board Cafe • By Jan Masaoka •

Despite the importance of the nonprofit board, there’s strikingly little clarity about who is responsible for its performance. The answer in this Board Cafe article might surprise you:

Who is responsible for the board’s doing its job? And a related question: who’s responsible for improving a board that’s asleep, weak, or gone amok? One answer might be: the board is responsible for the board! Or possibly, it’s the board chair who is responsible for the board. Or sometimes: it’s both.

We agree with Peter Drucker: The responsibility for the board’s effective work — both governance and support — is ultimately the responsibility of the executive director.

This can sound paradoxical (or even depressing) at first, but veteran successful executives know the truth of this statement. Executives take on their shoulders the responsibility for the success or failure of the organization — every part of it. If there were any other part of the organization that was under-performing, no executive would shrug, do nothing, and blame the program director or the administrative director. The executive would act to improve performance.

In a similar way, if the board is doing its job under its own leadership, the executive director can simply support that leadership. Let’s look at the possible combinations of strong/weak boards and CEOs. (To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/node/504 )

JOB OPENINGS

The North Valley Arts Council of Grand Forks is seeking an Executive Director to oversee the operations of the arts council. A complete job description can be found on the website at http://www.novac.org/. Interested persons should e-mail resumes to Julie Rygg, President, at julie@visitgrandforks.com applications will be accepted until April 9, 2010.

SECRITARY AND BOARD MEMBER POSITIONS AVAILABLE WITH THE BOZEMAN SCULPTURE PARK BOARD

The Bozeman Sculpture Park is envisioned as a premier venue for large, outdoor sculptures located adjacent to the Bozeman Public Library in downtown Bozeman.

Board Member responsibilities include, but are not limited to, attending monthly board meetings, voting, researching, planning, designing, marketing, promoting, contributing, and fundraising for the park.

The Secretaries responsibilities include those listed above as well as transcribing the correspondence of each monthly board meeting. Good writing and listening skills are a plus!

Please email a short letter to collinletts@yahoo.com stating why you are interested in the position and how you think your qualifications might contribute to the Bozeman Sculpture Park mission.

Please not that this is an unpaid, volunteer position, which requires a one to two year commitment. For more information please contact Collin at 406-579-1709.

Arts Organizations 3-24-2010

Artists 3-24-2010

Artists,

Below you will find information on a native artists study, 3 resources for visual artists and the Bozeman Sculpture Park is looking for new Board members.

Regards,
Beck
BeckMcLaughlin
Education & Web Services Director
Montana Arts Council
PO Box 202201
Helena, MT 59620-2201
406-444-6522
Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092

From National Assembly of State Arts Agencies News

Native Artists Study
Native Artists: Livelihoods, Resources, Space, Gifts, http://www.hhh.umn.edu/projects/prie/pdf/NativeArtistsLivelihoodsResourcesSpaceGifts1209.pdf
 from the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, explores the challenges facing Native artists. Interviews conducted with 50 Ojibwe artists shed light on the employment, assets, career evolution, resource needs and barriers faced by North American Woodland Indian artists.

VISUAL ART

Watermedia 2010
Montana Watercolor Society’s 28th Annual National Juried Exhibition
October 1-30 2010
Bigfork Museum of Art & History
Deadline May 1, 2010 – see attached for more information

ArtPerk helps Artists find opportunities to display their art in juried shows & competitions, online shows, art festivals, gallery shows, and other types of shows. Artists can also find residencies, fellowships, and grants, as well as jobs, internships and apprenticeships. ArtPerk is always FREE for Artists! http://www.artperk.com// (I get these notices on a regular basis. I’d appreciate feedback as to the usefulness of this site – or not. Beck)

Art21 Exclusive Videos: Paul McCarthy and Jessica Stockholder
How do you know when an artwork is finished? What makes something uncanny, something beautiful? Our most recent Exclusive videos highlight two artists who, while working from different sculptural traditions, share an open-ended creative process that’s responsive to an artwork’s form.
Paul McCarthy: Lifecasting
Episode #095: Surrounded by various figurative sculptures in progress in his Los Angeles studio, including an over-sized bust of President George W. Bush, artist Paul McCarthy discusses the process of casting from life and the resulting perfections and imperfections.
http://blog.art21.org/2010/02/26/paul-mccarthy-lifecasting/?
utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Art21_News

Jessica Stockholder: Form
Episode #096: From her home in New Haven, Connecticut, Jessica Stockholder discusses the strength of form and the difficulty in articulating the meaning behind abstract shapes.
http://blog.art21.org/2010/03/05/jessica-stockholder-form/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Art21_News

BOARD POSITION

SECRITARY AND BOARD MEMBER POSITIONS AVAILABLE WITH THE BOZEMAN SCULPTURE PARK BOARD
The Bozeman Sculpture Park is envisioned as a premier venue for large, outdoor sculptures located adjacent to the Bozeman Public Library in downtown Bozeman.
Board Member responsibilities include, but are not limited to, attending monthly board meetings, voting, researching, planning, designing, marketing, promoting, contributing, and fundraising for the park.
The Secretaries responsibilities include those listed above as well as transcribing the correspondence of each monthly board meeting. Good writing and listening skills are a plus!
Please email a short letter to collinletts@yahoo.com stating why you are interested in the position and how you think your qualifications might contribute to the Bozeman Sculpture Park mission.
Please not that this is an unpaid, volunteer position, which requires a one to two year commitment. For more information please contact Collin at 406-579-1709.

Artists 3-24-2010

Bringing a Whole New Meaning to the Term: Down on the Ranch

Italian-born artist and sculptor Benini, along with his wife Lorraine have taken a 147-acre ranch in Johnson City, Texas and offered over the landscape to art. A recent episode of Jeopardy, where a contestant named Benini, a baroque contemporary artist as his favorite sculptor made me jot the artist and the art term down on a grocery list. When an article in this week’s newspaper insert American Profile featured him and offered photos, I couldn’t ignore the coincidence and went out to investigate. At these various websites, readers will discover not only Benini’s work, but the work of many other sculptors. Take a moment to see some very interesting large-scale works of art with plenty of blue sky gallery space for viewing.

http://www.sculptureranch.com/

http://www.benini.com/

http://newyorkpanorama.com/2009/11/30/benini-sculpture-ranch-in-johnson-city-tx/

Hat tip to Kim for providing this info.

Bringing a Whole New Meaning to the Term: Down on the Ranch