Public Art

From Kim: 

Dear Artists, The nonprofit that has granted money for the support of Montana artists, Leveraging Investments in Creativity [LINC] is holding a design contest. Leading “ARTISTS SPACES” will be selected from across the country to receive unrestricted awards ranging from $10,000 -$50,000. Individual artists, Nonprofit organizations, public agencies, or a combination of the three designing space for artists will be eligible.

To learn more about the awards, including the guidelines for how to apply, please visit http://www.lincnet.net

For additional questions, or to request application materials in alternate form, you can contact Rise Wilson, Program Manager at

646-731-3275

Helpful links:

http://www.lincnet.net/artist-space/innovative-space-awards

http://www.lincnet.net/artist-space

p.s. Recently, an artist pointed out that I seem to send out opportunities that are for large-scale projects for outdoor and indoor spaces. I thought about this for a while and my reasoning has been, that I want to make sure Montanans are eligible and that the money involved is worth the travel and shipping, etc. The truth is that there are a multitude of public art opportunities out there that I do not forward, or that I don’t receive automatically.
Other ideas: you can check out the Public Art Network and decide about engaging in the listserv and seeing more opportunities and you can go out on the Internet and locate the public art programs in nearby states, bookmark their Public Art page into your Favorites and check these on a regular basis. For example: For Utah- I “googled” Utah Arts Council, which takes me to: http://arts.utah.gov and under Areas of Interest – http://arts.utah.gov/area_interest/public_arts/index.html

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Public Art

Positive Sharing

Check this out.

I originally found the website when my sister was trying to make her office a happier and more productive space. She sent me this article.*

Now, my office is pretty sweet. I have a window. And it opens. That’s a big deal in state government. I have pale green walls, an ergonomic workspace and a Ted Waddell print on my wall. (If I could just get some Larry Pirnie and an LA Huffman I’d be all set.)

When we moved offices several years ago, our Executive Director decided we should have an office that showed our spirit a little bit. She also realized happy employees are created from happy surroundings. So we have a nice rocker on our porch (perfect for reviewing grants) and an ice maker in our freezer (I keep saying it would be perfect for margaritas but no one listens to me). So I can’t really say my workspace needs a lot of improving… but I did love the article.

The rest of the site has some nifty articles as well.

*I’m happy to report she has filed her piles, hung some shelves and is getting a plant, a humidifier and a betta fish.

Positive Sharing

Artists 2-24-10

Artists,
Below you will find several items of general interest: MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards, Ways to Use Mobile Apps in the Arts, a list of artist job boards, and Green Papers from the Americans for the Arts. There are two opportunities for visual artists at the end of the email.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter  is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck Mcaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092
OPEN CALL FOR ENTRIES: 2010 METLIFE FOUNDATION INNOVATIVE SPACE AWARDS
Leveraging Investments in Creativity, in collaboration with MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and supported by a funding partnership of the MetLife Foundation and the Ford Foundation, announces an open call for entries to the 2010 MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards,  a grant-making program of Space for Change: Building Community through Innovative Spaces.
ABOUT THE AWARDS
Launched in 2009, the MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards is a competitive national funding program that recognizes outstanding efforts in the design and development of affordable space for artists. The program emphasizes the benefits artist spaces yield for both artists and their communities. In the Awards’ concluding round of grantmaking leading artist spaces will be selected from across the country to receive unrestricted awards ranging from $10,000 – $50,000 along with access to technical assistance and a learning community of peer institutions.
HOW TO APPLY
To learn more about the Awards, including the guidelines for how to apply, please visit www.lincnet.net/artist-space/space-for-change. All application materials must be received by April 23, 2010 at 5pm EST.  
ELIGIBILITY
Applications may be submitted by non-profit organizations, individual artists, public agencies, or a combination of the three, for artist space projects that:
  • Provide affordable space for artists to work, or to live and work
  • Are designed for multi-use or share space with a variety of tenants
  • Have been in place for a minimum of one year
  • Demonstrate a positive contribution (social, economic, cultural) to the community in which it exists
  • Promote ownership or significantly favorable lease terms for artists
From NASAA Notes (Assembly of State Arts Agencies)

Ways to Use Mobile Apps in the Arts
Over the past year, Technology in the Arts (TITA), a service of the Center for Arts Management and Technology (CAMT), http://camt.artsnet.org/Home.aspx  has been documenting the emergence of mobile technologies in the performing arts. In particular, there has been a lot of dis­cussion about mobile applications or “apps.” Recent articles on the TITA blog have examined the disagreement between artistic and administrative staff on the role of phones in the audience  http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1119  and new ways organizations are promoting arts through appshttp://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1226
The latest article from TITA, Mobile Apps and the Arts: Where We Are and Where We’re Going, http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1241  features an interview with Ron Evans, the founder of Groupofminds, that looks at how audiences and artists are using mobile tech­nology and what is on the horizon. In the interview, Ron discusses features that patrons may want in cell phone applications, the usefulness of mobile applica­tions to the organization, and what organizations might benefit from developing a mobile application.
Watch this 11-minute video  http://www.technologyinthearts.org/?p=1232  featuring Evans showing examples of current apps that performing arts orga­nizations have developed. (worth the 11 min if you aren’t familiar with these apps – Beck)
For more information about the application of mobile technology for arts orga­nizations, visit Technology in the Arts. The TITA blog  http://www.technologyinthearts.org/

Because of the current economic climate, we decided to compile a list of 85 artist job boards on Guide to Art Schools, http://www.guidetoartschools.com/tips-and-tools/job-boards-for-artists. The list of job boards will be very helpful to the artists in your state by increasing the number of positions they can apply for.
To celebrate the successes of the past 50 years in the arts field, Americans for the Arts has partnered with more than 20 national arts service organizations and peer groups representing different disciplines to collect Green Papers. These Green Papers are short, evolving vision statements of the future meant to inspire a nationwide dialogue on the arts. Over the course of 2010, anyone with a vested interest in the future of the arts is invited to comment, suggest changes, and offer alternative visions in this dynamic virtual exchange of ideas through the Green Paper section of ARTSblog.
VISUAL ART
Call to Artist

Bike Inspired Art : all mediums ( examples not limited to but encouraged sculpture from bike parts and found object, photography taken from a rider’s perspective, video installation, printmaking with bike parts)

Deadline March 31, 2010
Exhibition date April 23 – May 29, 2010
New Art Please Never Exhibited
Please send:
1.      .jpg of work to exhibit to info@c-emersonfinearts.com
2.      brief bio
3.      description of work , medium and date of creation
4.      Website to review previous experience and or work

Heroworship : A Graphic Tale of Epic Proportions
Deadline May 1, 2010
Exhibition Date Summer 2010
Illustration and alternative drawing show with a strong emphasis on positive influences, comics and what we value in this pop culture. Books and video installation as well are welcomed.
New Art Please Never Exhibited
Please send:

1.      .jpg of work to exhibit to info@c-emersonfinearts.com
2.      brief bio
3.      description of work , medium and date of creation
4.      Website to review previous experience and work

C.Emerson Fine Arts
St. Petersburg, FL 33731
727-898-6068
727-743-2033
http://www.c-emersonfinearts.com/

Artists 2-24-10

Arts Educators 2-24-10

Arts Educators,
Below you will find information about the Global Learning Studio symposium in London this summer, two new videos from Art21, Ways to Use Mobile Apps in the Arts, and Green Papers from the Americans for the Arts.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter  is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092
Summer Arts Learning Symposium – London
The Global Learning Studio is a professional development symposium to be held at The American School in London from Monday, 21 June to Friday, 25 June 2010.  Participation is open to classroom teachers in all grades and disciplines, curriculum leaders, teaching artists and administrators.  The content of the symposium will be rooted in the Teaching for Understanding (TfU) framework, with a focus on thinking and learning in the arts.  The symposium will be awarding graduate credit from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design, the oldest public arts college in the U.S., and is sponsored by The American School in London, the first only non-profit American school in England.  The Global Learning Studio is offered by Gateways to Understanding.
During five days in London the symposium will use arts based instruction to address how we can develop thinking and understanding in arts and non-arts disciplines.  Using cultural landmarks such as the Tate Modern, The British Museum, and the Museum of London, participants will explore integrative approaches to   the design and delivery of arts based learning experiences, disciplinary understanding, and effective tools for assessing student learning.
Art21 News: February 11, 2010
Our most recent Exclusive videos peer into the studios of two artists with African roots: South African artist William Kentridge (whose retrospective opens at this month at MoMA) and Ethiopian-born painter Julie Mehretu (whose exhibition of recent works opens at the Guggenheim in May).
William Kentridge | Breathe
Shot in his Johannesburg studio, William Kentridge reveals the process behind the video work Breathe–a component of the larger project (REPEAT) from the beginning / Da Capo (2008) that debuted at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice and at the nearby Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa in San Barnaba, Italy.
 Julie Mehretu | Workday
Filmed in her Berlin studio, Julie Mehretu discusses the ups and downs of her daily studio practice. Mehretu is shown working on the painting Middle Grey (2007-2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.
From NASAA Notes (Assembly of State Arts Agencies)
Ways to Use Mobile Apps in the Arts
Over the past year, Technology in the Arts (TITA), a service of the Center for Arts Management and Technology (CAMT), has been documenting the emergence of mobile technologies in the performing arts. In particular, there has been a lot of dis­cussion about mobile applications or “apps.” Recent articles on the TITA blog have examined the disagreement between artistic and administrative staff on the role of phones in the audience and new ways organizations are promoting arts through apps.
The latest article from TITA, Mobile Apps and the Arts: Where We Are and Where We’re Going, features an interview with Ron Evans, the founder of Groupofminds, that looks at how audiences and artists are using mobile tech­nology and what is on the horizon. In the interview, Ron discusses features that patrons may want in cell phone applications, the usefulness of mobile applica­tions to the organization, and what organizations might benefit from developing a mobile application.
Watch this 11-minute video featuring Evans showing examples of current apps that performing arts orga­nizations have developed. (worth the 11 min if you aren’t familiar with these apps – Beck)
For more information about the application of mobile technology for arts orga­nizations, visit Technology in the Arts. The TITA blog
To celebrate the successes of the past 50 years in the arts field, Americans for the Arts has partnered with more than 20 national arts service organizations and peer groups representing different disciplines to collect Green Papers. These Green Papers are short, evolving vision statements of the future meant to inspire a nationwide dialogue on the arts. Over the course of 2010, anyone with a vested interest in the future of the arts is invited to comment, suggest changes, and offer alternative visions in this dynamic virtual exchange of ideas through the Green Paper section of ARTSblog.
Arts Educators 2-24-10

Arts Organizations 2-24-10

Arts Organizations,
Below you will find information on corporate marketing sponsorships for nonprofits, Michael Kaiser will be in Billings March 29th, MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards, League of American Orchestrasnew Audience Demographic Research Review, Impact of the Recession on Nonprofits, Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination grants, Technology Donations for Nonprofit Arts Organizations, Ways to Use Mobile Apps in the Arts, 5 Tips for Creating Non-Profit Online Communities, Cheap, Fast, and Good. Can Nonprofits have them All?, two items from the Artful Manager blog, Board Café: What to Do When You Really, Really Disagree with a Board Decision, and Green Papers from the Americans for the Arts.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter  is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092
This month, Consultant’s Corner features an MNA (MT Nonprofit Association) interview with Barbara Harrington. Along with her business partner, Barbara has been helping nonprofits raise funds from corporate marketing budgets for 20 years. We asked her recently to share her knowledge about the basics of marketing sponsorships and the essentials of how a nonprofit should prepare to solicit funds from corporate marketing budgets. Barbara will be presenting the Creative Partnerships: Building Your Bottom Line With Innovative Corporate Sponsors webinar for MNA on Feb 25 (see the end of the blog article for details). 
MNA: What are corporate marketing sponsorship funds and why should nonprofits consider seeking them?
BH: Diversifying funding is a necessity for most nonprofits, yet many of us are unfamiliar with the revenue “marketing sponsorships” can bring. Corporate marketing or sponsorship budgets are different from corporate philanthropy dollars. Corporations spend a tremendous amount on marketing and getting their products in front of their target consumers. Traditional advertising is costly and not as effective, hence the growing popularity of marketing sponsorships with nonprofits. Some may think there isn’t a corporate structure in Montana…think again! Every product you see in every store is backed by considerable marketing dollars, and proven strategies exist for tapping into those funds for your organization. To be successful, nonprofits need to understand how corporations spend their marketing dollars and how toaccess these funds by setting values, clarifying benefits and ultimately documenting a return-on-investment for the sponsor.      
…Read the entire article on the MNA Blog http://www.mtnonprofit.org/blog.aspx (scroll down – Beck)
Community Conversation with Michael Kaiser
As President of the Kennedy Center and author of The Art of the Turnaround: Creating and Maintaining Healthy Arts Organizations, Michael Kaiser will speak to the Montana arts and cultural community about maintaining artistic creativity and integrity during these challenging economic times on Monday, March 29 at the Albert Bair Theaterin Billings. The event is Kaiser’s only stop in Montana as part of his national Arts in Crisis: A Kennedy Center Initiative tour of all 50 states. Register here.
OPEN CALL FOR ENTRIES: 2010 METLIFE FOUNDATION INNOVATIVE SPACE AWARDS
Leveraging Investments in Creativity, in collaboration with MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, and supported by a funding partnership of the MetLife Foundation and the Ford Foundation, announces an open call for entries to the 2010 MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards,  a grant-making program of Space for Change: Building Community through Innovative Spaces.
ABOUT THE AWARDS
Launched in 2009, the MetLife Foundation Innovative Space Awards is a competitive national funding program that recognizes outstanding efforts in the design and development of affordable space for artists. The program emphasizes the benefits artist spaces yield for both artists and their communities. In the Awards’ concluding round of grantmaking leading artist spaces will be selected from across the country to receive unrestricted awards ranging from $10,000 – $50,000 along with access to technical assistance and a learning community of peer institutions.
HOW TO APPLY
To learn more about the Awards, including the guidelines for how to apply, please visit www.lincnet.net/artist-space/space-for-change. All application materials must be received by April 23, 2010 at 5pm EST.  
ELIGIBILITY
Applications may be submitted by non-profit organizations, individual artists, public agencies, or a combination of the three, for artist space projects that:
  • Provide affordable space for artists to work, or to live and work
  • Are designed for multi-use or share space with a variety of tenants
  • Have been in place for a minimum of one year
  • Demonstrate a positive contribution (social, economic, cultural) to the community in which it exists
  • Promote ownership or significantly favorable lease terms for artists
From NASAA Notes (Assembly of State Arts Agencies)
In early 2009, the League of American Orchestras asked McKinsey & Company to collect and analyze existing orchestra audience participation data to understand the impact of demographic trends on orchestras now and in the future. The League’s new Audience Demographic Research Review contains their report. This report, released concurrently with the NEA’s Survey of Public Participation in the Arts findings, provides additional details about the behavior of orchestra audiences within and across generations.
Impact of the Recession on Nonprofits
The Johns Hopkins Listening Post Project, a part of the Center for Civil Society Studies, has recently released the results of their survey of nonprofit organizations. The survey sample includes nonprofits in children and family services, elderly hous­ing and services, education, community and economic development, and the arts. Findings indicate that the vast majority of nonprofits experienced fiscal stress during late 2008 and early 2009 and that arts organizations were particularly hard hit.
Federal Arts in Education Grant Program
The U.S. Department of Education is accepting applications for its Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination grants. This program supports the enhancement, expansion, documentation, evaluation, and dissemination of inno­vative, cohesive models that are based on research and have demonstrated that they effectively integrate standards based arts education into the core elementary and middle school curriculum; strengthen standards based arts instruction in these grades; and improve students’ academic performance, including their skills in cre­ating, performing, and responding to the arts. The application deadline is March 16.
Technology Donations for Nonprofit Arts Organizations in Your State
TechSoup is a not-for-profit organization that makes donated technology available to nonprofits. Forty major technology providers donate hardware and software, which TechSoup makes available to nonprofits for an administrative fee of as little as 5% of retail cost. In addition, TechSoup’s Refurbished Computer Initiative offers nonprofits low-cost, high-quality computers.
Ways to Use Mobile Apps in the Arts
Over the past year, Technology in the Arts (TITA), a service of the Center for Arts Management and Technology (CAMT), has been documenting the emergence of mobile technologies in the performing arts. In particular, there has been a lot of dis­cussion about mobile applications or “apps.” Recent articles on the TITA blog have examined the disagreement between artistic and administrative staff on the role of phones in the audience and new ways organizations are promoting arts through apps.
The latest article from TITA, Mobile Apps and the Arts: Where We Are and Where We’re Going, features an interview with Ron Evans, the founder of Groupofminds, that looks at how audiences and artists are using mobile tech­nology and what is on the horizon. In the interview, Ron discusses features that patrons may want in cell phone applications, the usefulness of mobile applica­tions to the organization, and what organizations might benefit from developing a mobile application.
Watch this 11-minute video featuring Evans showing examples of current apps that performing arts orga­nizations have developed. (worth the 11 min if you aren’t familiar with these apps – Beck)
For more information about the application of mobile technology for arts orga­nizations, visit Technology in the Arts. The TITA blog
Nonprofit Online News: http://news.gilbert.org/
 + 5 Tips for Creating Non-Profit Online Communities
   I am pleased to see that, more and more, listening is becoming a critical early step and key ongoing practice in recommended communication strategies of all kinds. As little as a year or two ago, it was more of an off-handed acknowledgement, quickly passed over in favor of discussions of tools and how to turn social media into broadcast media. Geoff Livingston’s 5 Tips for Creating Non-Profit Online Communities is a great example of this new strategic commitment. He gets it right from the start with tip #1: The Cause is the Purpose. Too often nonprofits will make the organization itself the purpose. Big mistake. Tip #2 is listening and he explicitly identifies the need for ongoing systems for paying attention to stakeholders. Read on for more detail about these two, along with his other three tips. This is inspiring stuff.
+ Cheap, Fast, and Good. Can Nonprofits have them All?
   There is occasionally a culture of exceptionalism in the nonprofit sector: We think our audiences are different and thus they will read our email newsletter, sent out as a 20 page PDF attachment. We think we shouldn’t have to look at efficient workflows because we can always squeeze more time out of our staff. We think we shouldn’t have to pay for expert advice because, well, we’re a nonprofit. You’re probably familiar with some of these. I’ll admit that I’ve caught myself on both sides of these dynamics.
   There is a saying among techies: “You want the project done cheap? You want it fast? You want it good? Pick two.” Michelle Murrain tackles the question of whether nonprofits are the exception to this rule: Cheap, Fast, and Good. Can Nonprofits have them All?
THE ARTFUL MANAGER | WEEKLY SUMMARY a weblog on the business of arts & culture by Andrew Taylor, ataylor@artsjournal.com
KINDA LIKE NETFLIX, ONLY FOR LIVE THEATER…
An increasing range of entertainment these days is available through a monthly all-access payment rather than a per-use or per-unit cost. Now Seattle’s ACT Theater is playing with the same idea for live theater, and it seems to be catching on.
Posted: Tuesday, February 16, 2010
BLENDING PROFESSIONAL AND AMATEUR…
I’ve had this Baltimore Symphony story simmering on the back burner for a few weeks, and continue to come back to it. The symphony hosted a special concert/performance event to allow amateur musicians to sit in with their professional counterparts.
Posted: Friday, February 19, 2010
What to Do When You Really, Really Disagree with a Board Decision
Board Cafe • By Jan Masaoka • February 22, 2010 •
Most of the time, nonprofit boards work through consensus. But what if you think a serious mistake is being made? Sometimes knowing what to do in advance if such a situation arises can help you understand the situation more clearly as it unfolds:
Have you ever been in a situation where the board has made a decision that you think is very wrong and will have severe negative consequences for the organization? Or where you think an important decision has been railroaded through?
As a board member myself and something of a contrarian, I’ve found myself in these circumstances from time to time over the years. For example, on the board of an organization with a sizable financial deficit, I found myself and one other board member losing a seventeen-to-two vote to take funds from the organization’s endowment for current operating expenses. As a member of CompassPoint consulting group for many years, I saw more serious cases, too, such as ones where board members suspected illegal activity or a takeover of the organization by a few very aggressive (and often new) board members.
It’s important to remember that reasonable people can disagree in good faith on important issues. The following situations may give you some food for thought if a case that goes beyond reasonable disagreement were to arise for you. To read more: http://www.blueavocado.org/content/what-do-when-you-really-really-disagree-board-decision
To celebrate the successes of the past 50 years in the arts field, Americans for the Arts has partnered with more than 20 national arts service organizations and peer groups representing different disciplines to collect Green Papers. These Green Papers are short, evolving vision statements of the future meant to inspire a nationwide dialogue on the arts. Over the course of 2010, anyone with a vested interest in the future of the arts is invited to comment, suggest changes, and offer alternative visions in this dynamic virtual exchange of ideas through the Green Paper section of ARTSblog.
Arts Organizations 2-24-10

Arts Educators 2-10-10

Arts Educators,
Below you will find resources from Art 21, some new resources posted on the arts counterbalance blog, and one job opening.
Information about unsubscribing to this email newsletter is at the end of the email.
Regards,
Beck
Beck McLaughlin Education & Web Services Director Montana Arts Council PO Box 202201 Helena, MT 59620-2201 406-444-6522 Arts in Education Hotline 800-282-3092
Art21 News
Art21 is launching the second year of
Art21 Educators, an intensive, year-long professional development initiative designed to cultivate and support K-12 art educators interested in bringing contemporary art, artists, and themes into their classrooms.

This program provides a unique professional development opportunity for educators to: spend an intensive year working with Art21 and a network of peers which kicks off with a 6-day institute in New York City; share innovative ideas, resources, and strategies with educators from across the country; and use video and other media to document and reflect on your teaching practice.

This round of Art21 Educators will be accepting applications from K-12 art and media teachers from across the United States. Emphasis will be placed on creating a diverse group of participants who reflect urban, rural, and suburban communities as well as distinct student populations.

Join a national group of educators to explore, design, and implement curriculum utilizing the visual art of our time. For more information and an application form, please visit art21.org.

Applications must be received by the Art21 Education Staff by Monday, February 26, 2010.
Questions? Check out our FAQs or if you’re still stumped, email education [at] art21.org

Exclusive Videos:
 Paul McCarthy | Animatronic Designer Jon Dawe
Animatronic Designer Jon Dawe reveals the process behind the robotic creature effects in artist Paul McCarthy’s sculpture Bush and Pig. Dawes previous work, as part of Stan Winston Studio and Tatopoulos Studios, includes special effects and mechanical designs for the popular films Jurassic Park, Hellboy, Underworld, and Fantastic Four, among others.
Allan McCollum | Shapes Copper Cookie Cutters
Larry Little, co-founder of Aunt Holly’s Copper Cookie Cutters with his wife Holly, describes his experiences working with artist Allan McCollum on Shapes from Maine (2009). Little describes the origins of his home business in Trescott, Maine, the process he developed for making cookie cutters by hand, and his working relationship with McCollum.
Teaching the Arts blog: arts counterbalance has some new resources posted: http://artscounterbalance.wordpress.com/
JOB OPENING
aRTS & HUMANITIES ASSOCIATE Main Arts Commision
CODE:  0822  PAY GRADE:  24 
Salary: $37,544.00-$50,876.80 annually
OPENING DATE:  January 21, 2010                                CLOSING DATE:  February 26, 2010
JOB DESCRIPTION:
This is professional services work providing leadership and oversight in the planning, development, coordination, administration and evaluation of the Maine Arts Commission’s Arts in Education program. The position works at the state level to implement Arts in Education programs and projects statewide, provide professional development opportunities and technical assistance to arts educators, teaching artists, arts organizations and others, and collaborates with state and national arts organizations and agencies to promote best practice and exemplary programming in visual art, music, theater and dance. An ability to intuitively engage in cross sector advocacy and the ability to make a case for arts in education and increase funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, Legislative appropriations and private sources. (see attached for full announcement – Beck)
Arts Educators 2-10-10